PipeChat Digest #1151 - Sunday, November 7, 1999
 
Re: choral vs. congregational settings, low vs. high-church, etc., Anglic
  by "Bud/Burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
the Hammond that DID die...
  by "Bud/Burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: the Hammond that DID die...
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: A quick question about bananas and performance anxiety
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: the Hammond that DID die...
  by "Bud/Burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: choral vs. congregational settings, low vs. high-church, etc., Anglican laundry day From: "Bud/Burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 6 Nov 1999 15:44:42 -0800   I think we're overlooking some things here, which I think can be documented from the OHS reprints of turn-of-the-century (and later) music magazines, commentaries, etc. ... I can't cite chapter and verse, but I remember being somewhat startled when I read the articles:   (1) There were MORE full-time positions and MORE professional choirs in the Episcopal church around the turn of the century than there are NOW. That's particularly startling, given the rapid growth of the Episcopal church in the period immediately before "The Troubles."   In the low churches, which celebrated the Eucharist once a month or once a QUARTER (the old colonial dioceses up and down the east coast), it's highly unlikey that the congregation would have LEARNED a setting, given the infrequent celebrations, AND the general prejudice against singing the Communion Service. I remember at an RSCM workshop in Princeton as late as the '60s, there was some difficulty in agreeing on a Setting that everyone knew, since there were more choir-boys from low churches than there were from high churches ... I think we settled on Merbecke and the Scottish Gloria.   Also, the teens and the twenties of this century were the high-water-mark of the Anglo-Catholic Movement. THEY certainly followed contemporary Roman Catholic practice, to a fault ... which included NO congregational participation WHATSOEVER, at least at High Masses. St. Mary-the-Virgin (NYC) in Father Taber's time didn't give a general Communion at the High Mass, and that is within my lifetime and memory. A couple of hymns were sung, but the choir sang the rest. I remember having to stay for the noon Low Mass in order to receive Communion.   BTW, Fr. Taber had an ENORMOUS effect on whole generations of seminarians who went through General Seminary during that time ... he was confessor and spiritual director to most of them. And, according to my Rector in high school, he wasn't above pulling back the curtain, looking over his glasses, and inquiring why the penitent hadn't shown up to serve his 7 a.m. Mass that week (grin).   There were DEFINITELY more Anglo-Catholic churches back then than there are now, even if you only count up to the period immediately BEFORE "The Troubles".   There was a succession of Presiding Bishops in the '40s and '50s who instituted nothing less than a "reign of terror" against the Anglo-Catholics ... I remember the name of one: Henry Knox (!) Sherrill, because he was still the PB when I was growing up. He wasn't above using blackmail against vestries and priests to get them to stop their "romish" ways. I've forgotten the details now at the distance of nearly fifty years, but I DO remember the Episcopal Diocese of Northern Ohio (Cleveland) being littered with altar-screens and gradines that still showed the marks of where the Tabernacles were ripped out at his insistence. And saintly Bishop Conklin was forced out of the Diocese of Chicago under threat of "public scandal" ... he was interim Rector of St. David's, Lakeland when I was organist there, Bishop Louttit having given him shelter.   Having come of age in a solidly Anglo-Catholic parish (St. Paul's, Winter Haven) in a solidly Anglo-Catholic diocese (South Florida), I was taught to be charitable (if somewhat amused) at low-church foibles. But when I went to college in Northern Ohio, I ran smack-dab into the real HATRED of all things Anglo-Catholic that still existed in the Church at that time. In fact, I was probably prevented from getting an Episcopal organ job in those days because it was generally known (or if it wasn't, they ASKED) that I was a communicant of St. James on 55th Street (now an Anglican Catholic parish).   The first time the Bishop of Northern Ohio set FOOT in St. James was at Canon Peterson's funeral ... and he wasn't invited (!). I guess he figured he was finally gonna get control of the parish, which he didn't. They bought their property back from the Diocese eventually and joined the ACC.   It's really no wonder that the Church flew apart at the seams when "The Troubles" started. Anglo-Catholics were the source of much scorn and amusement, even in the House of Bishops ... but by then it wasn't the orthodox Evangelicals vs. the orthodox Catholics (they had formerly had a gentlemen's agreement) ... it was the broad-church vs. EVERYBODY else. And, obviously, the broad-church won. As many low-church parishes in Virginia left as did Anglo-Catholic parishes across the Biretta Belt (the Midwest). The REAL issue was theology, not liturgy.   Alas, poor ceremonies ...   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: the Hammond that DID die... From: "Bud/Burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 6 Nov 1999 16:15:59 -0800   This one had some truly WEIRD problems: off-and-on cyphers, which I'd NEVER experienced on a Hammond; a pedal-board with a mind of its own (some notes played, some didn't) ... the Pedal Solo Unit was dead, of course ... they ALWAYS die first, and most people just simply won't be bothered to work on them. But the biggest problem was the speakers ... the cabinet was way up in the peak of the roof ... the desert heat had baked them to a fare-thee-well, and the Rector and I weren't ABOUT to buy new speakers for the beast ... he wanted rid of it as badly as I did. We had borrowed a Leslie from a parishioner in the interim, until a new organ could be gotten. In fact, the speakers crumbled to dust when they took the old organ out. We had already replaced the Vibrato Scanner, of course, but several repair people just couldn't find the cyphers or fix the pedal-board.   And, as I pointed out, it was difficult enough for a small parish like that to find an organist, without confronting them with an elderly Hammond. And indeed they've been able to attract a competent one as a result of the new organ.   Cheers,   Bud     >At 12:16 PM 11/6/1999 -0800, you wrote: >> >>I managed to get them to buy a PLAYABLE organ (they had a moribund >>Hammond Concert Model), and I bulldozed together a small choir.<snip> > >A tonewheel Hammond?? Moribund?? Impossible! > >hehehehe! > > > >    
(back) Subject: Re: the Hammond that DID die... From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 06 Nov 1999 18:44:59   At 04:15 PM 11/6/1999 -0800, you wrote: >This one had some truly WEIRD problems: off-and-on cyphers, >which I'd NEVER experienced on a Hammond; a pedal-board with >a mind of its own (some notes played, some didn't) ... the >Pedal Solo Unit was dead, of course ... they ALWAYS die >first, and most people just simply won't be bothered to work >on them.<snip>   Shame...they're really easy to fix, too. Pedal cyphers/dead notes can usually be blamed on carpeting under the organ. The console will sink, = due to its considerable heft, but the pedalboard usually sinks in at a forward angle, making predictable contact by the keying "fingers" a crap shoot at best. As far as manual cyphers, I'd agree that this is truly weird. Some can be traced to cadmium "hair" growth inside the manual chassis...also a big problem in the scanner switch cover.   >But the biggest problem was the speakers ... the >cabinet was way up in the peak of the roof ... the desert >heat had baked them to a fare-thee-well, and the Rector and >I weren't ABOUT to buy new speakers for the beast<snip>   Hmmm...this wouldn't have been in Lancaster, would it have been? "Edge of desert" does sound more like Banning/Beaumont, though.   >And, as I pointed out, it was difficult enough for a small >parish like that to find an organist, without confronting >them with an elderly Hammond. And indeed they've been able >to attract a competent one as a result of the new organ.   Yes, that's very true! The few of us that know Hammonds well, AND that = can play a decent liturgy are now getting fewer and further between. I can remember playing in 5 RC churches in the "Inland Empire", all of which had RT models, and, interestingly, all of which switched to Rodgers. But, a Hammond is as foreign to most pipe players as a Mighty WurliTzer must have been to E. Power Biggs!   LOL   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: A quick question about bananas and performance anxiety From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sat, 06 Nov 1999 22:57:50 -0600   Glenda wrote: > > Let's see - I soaked the bananas in vodka and orange juice (peeling half = the > bunch and leaving the peel on the other half), then froze them.   The way I like to do them is to cut them up into pieces, cover them with a sprinkling of brown sugar, then pour rum on them, and let them sit a while before consuming them. Delicious!   John.  
(back) Subject: Re: the Hammond that DID die... From: "Bud/Burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 6 Nov 1999 21:08:05 -0800   >Shame...they're really easy to fix, too. Pedal cyphers/dead notes can >usually be blamed on carpeting under the organ. The console will sink, due >to its considerable heft, but the pedalboard usually sinks in at a forward >angle, making predictable contact by the keying "fingers" a crap shoot at >best.   Nope, I knew to check that ... shimming the front of the console, pedal-board, etc. didn't do any good ... it was an electrical problem, evidently.   As far as manual cyphers, I'd agree that this is truly weird. Some >can be traced to cadmium "hair" growth inside the manual chassis...also a >big problem in the scanner switch cover. > >>But the biggest problem was the speakers ... the >>cabinet was way up in the peak of the roof ... the desert >>heat had baked them to a fare-thee-well, and the Rector and >>I weren't ABOUT to buy new speakers for the beast<snip> > >Hmmm...this wouldn't have been in Lancaster, would it have been? "Edge of >desert" does sound more like Banning/Beaumont, though.   St. Stephen's Episcopal in Beaumont ... > >>And, as I pointed out, it was difficult enough for a small >>parish like that to find an organist, without confronting >>them with an elderly Hammond. And indeed they've been able >>to attract a competent one as a result of the new organ. > >Yes, that's very true! The few of us that know Hammonds well, AND that can >play a decent liturgy are now getting fewer and further between   I have no problem playing a Hammond if it WORKS ... I'd almost prefer a tonewheeler to the hybrid Hammond/Suzuki beast I've got now (which also doesn't work). I had never played a Hammond regularly until fairly recently, but I'm always curious as to what makes an organ tick, and how to get the most out of it, so I learned the drawbars and how to change the presets, etc. on tonewheelers ... AND how to OIL them ... probably the MOST important thing (grin).   >Hammond is as foreign to most pipe players as a Mighty WurliTzer must have >been to E. Power Biggs! > >LOL > >DeserTBoB   That's the point I've been trying to make in the present situation ... if you think a tonewheeler is foreign to pipe players, THIS thing is TOTALLY incomprehensible ... half programming, half playing ... and when it crashes, you have to reset all the parameters in the little LED hatch.   When I called the AGO sub list and everybody turned me down because of the organ, I tried to explain to the Rector that it wasn't JUST snobbery (there certainly is THAT), but also that 99% of today's organists have NO idea what to do with drawbars, etc. They just flat-out don't know how to PLAY a Hammond of ANY description.   Sigh ...   Bud