PipeChat Digest #1156 - Friday, November 12, 1999
 
Re: Music, Church, Sport, Amateurism, Professionalism.
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net>
Michel Colin American Debut Recital (X posted)
  by <WAYNE_BURCHAM@rsausa.com>
Carnegie Hall organ?
  by "Adrianne Schutt" <maybe@pipcom.com>
Re: Carnegie Hall organ?
  by "bud" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: Carnegie Hall organ?
  by "Stanley E Yoder" <syoder+@andrew.cmu.edu>
RE: Glenda's Recital
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
congregational settings of Mag & Nunc (1662/1928 BCP) (X-posted)
  by "bud" <budchris@earthlink.net>
A practice organ needed...
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: A practice organ needed...
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Carnegie Hall organ?
  by <Mark85inCT@aol.com>
Re: Carnegie Hall organ?
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
Re: Carnegie Hall organ?
  by <OrganMD@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Music, Church, Sport, Amateurism, Professionalism. From: Alan Freed <afreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 11 Nov 1999 12:14:06 -0500   > From: "Mark Checkley" <xcs53@dial.pipex.com> > > Am I perhaps learning that amateurism is NOT THE AMERICAN WAY ? > > Might it be that people do what they are paid to do, but otherwise don't = do > it ? > > Could the same differences apply in music / culture as seem to apply > on the sports' field ? > Mark (if I may butt into your query to Bud):   I think that there is much truth to what you say. But I don't think it's = by any means the whole picture.   I never saw my father throw a baseball or any other kind; with rare exceptions the parents of my neighborhood pals didn't do any such stuff either. But they did other things that were productive in their own ways: They raised chickens, or hoed in the garden, or tended the trees in the orchard, or built a new garage, or did volunteer work at the church, at a hospital, at an aged neighbor's yard, or whatever.   "Sports" for us adults is a spectator thing, not a participatory thing (unless you're helping run your kids' sports program). And I grant you = that that makes our culture the poorer.   In my own life (as differentiated from that of my parents' generation), = it's the same. My friends and I engage in no sports. We'd be better off if we did. But we'd also be poorer by the loss of doing the things that we do instead of sports. Sports, just for the fun of it, is for the wealthy, = who have the leisure time to go sailing, play polo, play cricket, etc. (all of which are done here in the New York City area), because they can hire gardeners to tend to the garden, repair the stone wall of the garden, etc.   Yes, this applies also to music. But not as much as you may think. = Perhaps we're more sedentery than we are. Among friends in this parish, I know several (all under 25) who enjoy playing a little softball now and then, = but I know quite a few who'll get together to sing, to play an instrument in a brass quartet, or to volunteer at the old folks' home a block away, all without pay, but just because it's pleasant.   Alan                  
(back) Subject: Michel Colin American Debut Recital (X posted) From: WAYNE_BURCHAM@rsausa.com Date: Thu, 11 Nov 1999 15:18:08 -0500       Hi List,   I had the pleasure of attending a recital last Fri. 11/05/99, the American debut, by the French organist Michel Colin at Grace Episcopal Church, Middletown, NY (about 1 hour north of NYC). I was not familiar with this = artist before, so I'll reprint the following bio from the program: "Michel Colin was born in 1964. His first studies were on the piano; he = won a prize for excellence in performance at the 1983 Musica competition in = Rheims, France. One of his first organ teachers was Andre Fleury. In 1986, = Michel Colin won a gold medal in the class of Francoise Renet at the Marcel Dupre School in Meudon. In 1988, he again won a gold medal in the class of = Odile Pierre at the Paris regional campus of the National Conservatory of = France. After appointments as organist at the Paris churches of Saint Denis and = the Redemption, he was named organist at the French cathedral of Meaux. Subsequently, after having chosen to settle in Provence, he was appointed titular organist of the great organ at the church of Notre-Dame de la = Victoire in Saint Raphael, where he is also Professor at the Municipal School of = Music. He is in constant demand as a recitalist throughout Europe. He has = recorded for France Musique USA and on the EMA label."   The program: Concerto in D Major Claude Balbastre Prelude Allegro Gavotte Noel XI Louis-Claude Daquin Fantaisie et Fugue in B Flat Major Alexandre-Pierre-Francois Boely Andante con moto Boely Verset sur Judex Crederis Boely Intermission Suite Algerienne Camille Saint-Saens Reverie du soir (Bildah) Suite Gothique Leon Boellmann Introduction-Chorale Menuet Gothique Priere a Notre-Dame Toccata Improvisation Michel Colin   This was a very interesting concert by the French organist Michel Colin. = It was also nice to see people of all ages attending. It was sponsored = free-of-charge by the Central Hudson Valley Chapter of the A.G. O., Pat Maimone, Dean. = The Austin organ at Grace Church performed well in spite of the very dry = acoustics. I used my imagination to "hear" the music rolling around in 8 seconds of reverberation as it was intended to be heard. The Balbastre and Boely = works performed were new to this listener and worth exposure. At the time for improvisation, two envelopes were presented to Messieur Colin that = contained the hymn tunes: "Leoni" (The God of Abrah'm Praise) Hebrew Melody and = "Jerusalem" (O Day of Peace) C. H. H. Parry. M. Colin quipped in an Academy Awards style = as he pulled out the hymn tunes, "And the winner is." He then improvised a ca. = 15 minute one movement multi sectional work incorporating the tunes in = various and delightful ways. This was very inspired improvising and not just the = usual "formulas" one sometimes hears. (My only disappointment, which in no way detracted from my enjoyment of the concert, was that there were no works = other than the Improv from the last 100 years - no Widor, Vierne, Dupre, = Langlais, Alain, Durufle, Messiaen, et al.) I hope that we will be hearing more = from this gifted performer. The reception following, with Michel in attendance, was = very elegant. Do Episcopalians know how to throw a party or what! If you get = a chance to hear Michel Colin, by all means go. You won't be disappointed.   (I've been holding off posting this while I am waiting for snail mail to = deliver the Austin specification which I hoped to include. So I'll post now and = send specs later when the U. S. Snail arrives.)   Regards,   Wayne NYC & Milford, PA            
(back) Subject: Carnegie Hall organ? From: Adrianne Schutt <maybe@pipcom.com> Date: Thu, 11 Nov 1999 15:44:58 -0800   I was asked this afternoon what kind of organ is in Carnegie Hall, and altavista.com isn't exactly leaping forth to land a spec sheet on my monitor. :)   http://www.rodgerscorp.com/products/series/751.html says that Carnegie Hall has a Rodgers, but doesn't say what model. http://www.hof.org/companies/rodgers/rodgersbios.html says something about a 5m Rodgers going from Carnegie Hall to some theatre in Portland.   Anyone happen to know what's there at the moment? Thanks!   Have fun! Adrianne ;->    
(back) Subject: Re: Carnegie Hall organ? From: bud <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 11 Nov 1999 13:20:44 -0800   A Flentrop was ordered for Carnegie Hall some years ago, but the powers = that were had concerns that it would alter the fabulous acoustics. Legend has it = that Oberlin's Flentrop was the instrument originally intended for Carnegie = Hall, but I think that's unlikely, since Oberlin has a Rueckpositiv. The Rodgers was = next, but it did indeed go to the Great Northwet ... I have seen parts of it = advertised for sale in the various classifieds. I THINK there's no permanent instrument = in the hall currently, beyond a positive (perhaps).   BTW ... there WAS an Aeolian-Skinner in the new Metropolitan Opera House, = but I haven't heard it or seen any reference to it in forever ... does IT still = exist?   Cheers,   Bud   Adrianne Schutt wrote:   > I was asked this afternoon what kind of organ is in Carnegie = Hall, and > altavista.com isn't exactly leaping forth to land a spec sheet on my > monitor. :) > > http://www.rodgerscorp.com/products/series/751.html says that = Carnegie > Hall has a Rodgers, but doesn't say what > model. http://www.hof.org/companies/rodgers/rodgersbios.html says > something about a 5m Rodgers going from Carnegie Hall to some theatre in > Portland. > > Anyone happen to know what's there at the moment? Thanks! > > Have fun! > Adrianne ;-> > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Carnegie Hall organ? From: Stanley E Yoder <syoder+@andrew.cmu.edu> Date: Thu, 11 Nov 1999 16:33:53 -0500 (EST)   Excerpts from mail: 11-Nov-99 Re: Carnegie Hall organ? by = bud@earthlink.net > Legend has it that > Oberlin's Flentrop was the instrument originally intended for Carnegie Hall, but > I think that's unlikely, since Oberlin has a Rueckpositiv. The Rodgers was next [snip]   Wasn't there a Saville electronic in there before the Rodgers?   Stan Yoder Pittsburgh  
(back) Subject: RE: Glenda's Recital From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Thu, 11 Nov 1999 16:36:32 -0600   Glenda:   I was delighted to hear that Steve is coming your way. He and I were discussing a Florida gig (at Trinity Cathedral, Miami) when I lived there, but we didn't bring it off. Maybe I'll come down and join the festivities in January. (Don't worry, I'll bring my own gin....)   Just returned from as glorious week in Seattle visitng several of the = organs that will be featured at the July AGO convention. I insist that you go if you can.   Cheers,   Peter    
(back) Subject: congregational settings of Mag & Nunc (1662/1928 BCP) (X-posted) From: bud <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 11 Nov 1999 16:35:05 -0800   Does anyone know of through-composed settings of the Mag and Nunc for UNISON CONGREGATION? I've about run thru the Anglican chants and plainsong tunes ... I have Bairstow in E Flat and Vaughn Williams in d minor, but the former is too complicated and the latter takes a choir as well. I'm looking for things a (fairly savvy) congregation could learn to sing in unison WITHOUT a choir. I suppose settings for unison trebles could be transposed down, if they're not TOO complicated ...   N.B. - MUST be the OLD (1662/1928) BCP text.   Thanks!   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: A practice organ needed... From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Thu, 11 Nov 1999 19:53:24 -0500 (EST)   I have a student who is looking for a small pipe organ for practice. He prefers tracker action but will consider an alternative. Does anyone know of a two to five rank instrument, hopefully but not necessarily, in a fairly close proximity to Florida. It's okay if it needs some work, but they would prefer readily playable after re-assembly. Thanks for your help...   bruce cornely ~:~:~ rohrschok8@webtv.net gainesville, florida    
(back) Subject: Re: A practice organ needed... From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Thu, 11 Nov 1999 19:17:09   At 07:53 PM 11/11/1999 -0500, you wrote: >I have a student who is looking for a small pipe organ for practice. He >prefers tracker action but will consider an alternative. Does anyone >know of a two to five rank instrument, hopefully but not necessarily, in >a fairly close proximity to Florida. It's okay if it needs some work, >but they would prefer readily playable after re-assembly. Thanks for >your help...<snip>   WHY saddle this poor student with all that hassle and expense of a pipe organ? I'm SURE you have one of your Bawldwin Schpinettes in your collection you'd LUV to donate!   BWAAAAAAAHAHAHAHAHAHA! > >bruce cornely ~:~:~ rohrschok8@webtv.net gainesville, florida > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > >  
(back) Subject: Re: Carnegie Hall organ? From: Mark85inCT@aol.com Date: Thu, 11 Nov 1999 21:46:47 EST   Just for the record, Oberlin's Flentrop was not conceived for Carnegie = Hall. It was designed and built for Warner Concert Hall at the Conservatory.  
(back) Subject: Re: Carnegie Hall organ? From: ManderUSA@aol.com Date: Thu, 11 Nov 1999 22:07:07 EST   In a message dated 11/11/99 9:48:26 PM Eastern Standard Time, Mark85inCT@aol.com writes:   << Just for the record, Oberlin's Flentrop was not conceived for Carnegie Hall. It was designed and built for Warner Concert Hall at the Conservatory. >>   The Flentrop conceived for Carnegie Hall, given by the Simon Family, was refused by Isaac Stern, who had become president of Carnegie Hall (which = he played a huge role in saving) between the time of the gift and the = completion of the organ. The instrument ended up at the State University of New York, =   where Anthony Newman was teaching at the time. I gather the organ, a hovercraft (really), is still there, but rarely used, if at all. Stern was =   convinced that the presence of the organ would ruin the famous acoustic of =   the hall. I was not joking about the hovercraft. With the big fan turned = on, the organ rises, and rides where you tell it on a cushion of air, and = settles gently when the air is turned off. I am told the thing makes a terrible = great noise.   A five manual Rodgers was installed in the hall, with speakers all over = the place - I can't recall the year, but am quite sure the Pierre Cochereau played a dedication recital. I played it once for a concert opera = performance - it was really not a wonderful thing. All of that was removed at the renovation of the hall, and I believe a Renta-Rodgers is brought in when needed now.   There was a reasonably complete thread about this on PipOrg-L quite some = time ago, and that should be available from the archives.   Someone asked about the Metropolitan Opera House. There is a 1963 = Two-Manual AEolian-Skinner organ backstage, still in use, I believe, of a somewhat special design for operatic requirements, with no thought of it ever = needing to play the organ repertoire. There was a highly informative thread about this on PipOrg-L some time ago, and again, that should be easy to find in = the list archives.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Carnegie Hall organ? From: OrganMD@aol.com Date: Fri, 12 Nov 1999 00:54:04 EST   To all that care: Unless I am mistaken, the present Carnegie instrument is a custom = speakered Rodgers 965.   Bill