PipeChat Digest #1157 - Friday, November 12, 1999
 
60's Reuter, can I monkey?
  by "Charles E. Peery" <cpeery19@idt.net>
AMADEUS
  by "Robert  Eversman" <highnote@mhtc.net>
RE: AMADEUS
  by "Tim Byram-Wigfield" <t_byram-wigfield@jesus.cam.ac.uk>
RE: AMADEUS
  by "Mark Harris" <M.Harris@Admin.lon.ac.uk>
Re: AMADEUS
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: A practice organ needed...
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: 60's Reuter, can I monkey?
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: AMADEUS
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: congregational settings of Mag & Nunc (1662/1928 BCP) (X-posted)
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Metropolitan Opera House
  by "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org>
Frank, Howells, Telemann and Peeters
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: Metropolitan Opera House
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Frank, Howells, Telemann and Peeters
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Metropolitan Opera House
  by "ray ahrens" <ray_ahrens@hotmail.com>
Re: Frank, Howells, Telemann and Peeters
  by "Evelyn Rowe" <efrowe@mindspring.com>
Re: Music, Church, Sport, Amateurism, Professionalism.
  by "Karl E. Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersv.edu>
Re: Metropolitan Opera House
  by "Maynard Cuppy" <cuppy.maynard@mcleodusa.net>
Re: Metropolitan Opera House
  by "Phil Stimmel" <pca@sover.net>
Re: Metropolitan Opera House
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
 


(back) Subject: 60's Reuter, can I monkey? From: "Charles E. Peery" <cpeery19@idt.net> Date: Fri, 12 Nov 1999 06:06:47 -0400   Dear Listers,   I've just taken a job at a church with a 60's vintage Reuter 2 manual = which is, in a word, unreliable. For example, last night at choir rehearsal, = the g above middle C on all the swell flutes (16,8,4,2) and the solo trumpet just STUCK on. Not ALWAYS on, put if you put down the stop tabs on any of those stops, you get that g sounding that you can't get rid of. The tuner was just here a week ago, so it isn't as if the organ is in bad repair or ill-maintained. In fact, he probably visits this organ more than some others, because of such quirks. He's a good guy, I've got a call into = him and think he'll be there before Sunday, but this got me thinking:   Is this stuff I can monkey with when it goes wrong? I mean, what if this happens during warm-up on a Sunday morning? I am not trained in organ maintenance, nor in electronics. But something tells me I better become a little more familiar with what I might be able to do under such circumstances. The choir laughed and said "this happens all the time".... oh boy....   Another wrinkle is that they've formed a committee to fund a new instrument/rebuild/extension/who knows what. Guess who's at the top of = their list? Reuter, 'cause that's what they've got. I know of some similar vintage instruments that don't have this gremlinish tendency, I wonder if it's just an age thing or peculiar to the builder in some way.   Can anyone advise me? Either in the short term (how to climb up there and STOP THIS G!) or in the long term (good builders to steer them toward).   Chuck Peery Cincinnati   cpeery19@idt.net  
(back) Subject: AMADEUS From: "Robert Eversman" <highnote@mhtc.net> Date: Fri, 12 Nov 1999 06:11:46 -0600   Hi all: I currently use Finale and from the beginning we have had a love hate relationship (mostly hate <G>). I would like to buy Sibelius but just can't swing the $600. AN advertisement for a program called Amadeus = looks pretty good. Most of what I need to write is fairly simple and I don't = plan to use a keyboard with my pc. My main reason for wanting to work on the computer is because I have terrible music writing ability (degree notwithstanding...my poor teachers !) I need something very very easy to work with and have no immediate plans to write a cycle of symphonies so I am thinking a lower priced software package might work. If I am all washed up just tell me, I can take it :)   Does anyone have any opinion or experience with the program AMADEUS = ($100) ? Or other suggestions? If anyone does have Amadeus will it handle more than one stanza of lyrics? Pros and cons would be much appreciated.   Thanks in advance.   Robert Eversman Mineral Point WI   highnote@mhtc.net  
(back) Subject: RE: AMADEUS From: "Tim Byram-Wigfield" <t_byram-wigfield@jesus.cam.ac.uk> Date: Fri, 12 Nov 1999 12:34:39 -0000   I'm surprised Sibelius is so expensive in the States. The basic package here in the U.K. is =A3325 (possibly +VAT)...   > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of > Robert Eversman > Sent: 12 November 1999 12:12 > To: PipeChat . > Subject: AMADEUS > > > Hi all: I currently use Finale and from the beginning we have had a = love > hate relationship (mostly hate <G>). I would like to buy Sibelius but = just > can't swing the $600. AN advertisement for a program called > Amadeus looks > pretty good. Most of what I need to write is fairly simple and I > don't plan > to use a keyboard with my pc. My main reason for wanting to work on the > computer is because I have terrible music writing ability (degree > notwithstanding...my poor teachers !) I need something very very easy to > work with and > have no immediate plans to write a cycle of symphonies so I am thinking = a > lower priced software package might work. If I am all washed up just = tell > me, I can take it :) > > Does anyone have any opinion or experience with the program > AMADEUS ($100) > ? Or > other suggestions? If anyone does have Amadeus will it handle more than > one stanza of lyrics? Pros and cons would be much appreciated. > > Thanks in advance. > > Robert Eversman > Mineral Point WI > > highnote@mhtc.net > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: RE: AMADEUS From: "Mark Harris" <M.Harris@Admin.lon.ac.uk> Date: Fri, 12 Nov 1999 12:46:31 GMT   Tim Byram-Wigfield wrote:     > I'm surprised Sibelius is so expensive in the States. The basic > package here in the U.K. is =A3325 (possibly +VAT)...   On those figures, the prices seem broadly comparable: =A3325 + VAT converts to almost US$620 at the current rate of US$1.62 to =A31.   Mark Harris =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D  
(back) Subject: Re: AMADEUS From: David Scribner <david@blackiris.com> Date: Fri, 12 Nov 1999 07:25:18 -0600   Robert   If I am not mistaken there is an educational price on Sibelius that includes those who are church musicians. You might want to check that out.   David  
(back) Subject: Re: A practice organ needed... From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Fri, 12 Nov 1999 09:30:33 -0500 (EST)   grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr   ;-)   bruce cornely ~:~:~ rohrschok8@webtv.net gainesville, florida    
(back) Subject: Re: 60's Reuter, can I monkey? From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Fri, 12 Nov 1999 09:40:22 -0500 (EST)     > the g above middle C on all the swell flutes > (16,8,4,2) and the solo trumpet just STUCK > on. Not ALWAYS on, put if you put down the > stop tabs on any of those stops, you get that > g sounding that you can't get rid of. This sounds like a fairly simple electrical problem (which one does not have on trackers, heh heh hink hink wink wink nudge nudge)!! Get the service guy over to look at it and stay with him so he can show you what the problem is and how to fix it.   >I mean, what if this happens during warm-up > on a Sunday morning? Is there a piano close by?? Or, after you've learned how to fix it, simply (on Sunday when the nave is full!), fix the problem, make alot of serious noise, un-fix the problem, make alot of serious noise, fix the problem, ad nauseum until there is enough money in the organ fun for that new organ!   >Another wrinkle is that they've formed a > committee to fund a new > instrument/rebuild/extension/who knows what. > Guess who's at the top of their list? Reuter, > 'cause that's what they've got. Not a terribly bad wrinkle, but there are so many excellent builders around today. Investigate, remembering that companies change over the years. You want to see what kind of work they are doing TODAY and how their recent instruments are holding up. Go visit other builder's new organs. They may find something they like better. However, you will need to be open-minded and objective until a decision needs to be made at the end of the project. Don't waste your breath until then!         bruce cornely ~:~:~ rohrschok8@webtv.net gainesville, florida    
(back) Subject: Re: AMADEUS From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Fri, 12 Nov 1999 09:43:29 -0500 (EST)   Robert, Sibelius has an institutional discount which is almost half price. If your using it for/with your church job or school it could save you some money. I really, however, do not understand why they think individuals have more money to spend than institutions. In actuality, it really gripes me when companies do this (pant pant, gasp), but that is another soapbox!! ;-)   I really like Sibelius!   bruce cornely ~:~:~ rohrschok8@webtv.net gainesville, florida    
(back) Subject: Re: congregational settings of Mag & Nunc (1662/1928 BCP) (X-posted) From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Fri, 12 Nov 1999 09:35:05 -0600   bud wrote: > > Does anyone know of through-composed settings of the Mag and Nunc for > UNISON CONGREGATION? I've about run thru the Anglican chants and > plainsong tunes ... I have Bairstow in E Flat and Vaughn Williams in d > minor, but the former is too complicated and the latter takes a choir > as well. I'm looking for things a (fairly savvy) congregation could > learn to sing in unison WITHOUT a choir. I suppose settings for unison > trebles could be transposed down, if they're not TOO complicated ... > > N.B. - MUST be the OLD (1662/1928) BCP text.   The Bairstow E flat is certainly a good one to use. The Vaughan Williams setting for unison singing is the one in C major, not D minor. This does go into two and four parts in places, but is designed by the composer so that it can be sung in unison throughout if desired. It is published by Curwen. There is also a very nice unison setting in C minor by George Dyson, published by Oxford University Press. I'm not sure how well a congregation would get on with any of these, but they certainly work very nicely with a small choir where part-singing is not practicable.   John Speller  
(back) Subject: Metropolitan Opera House From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> Date: Fri, 12 Nov 1999 13:01:12 -0500   I had the good fortune in 1993 while between jobs to take a temp position = as assistant archivist at Lincoln Center Archives. With quite a bit of time = on my hands I was able to catalog material on both the organ in Alice Tully Hall and the Metropolitan Opera House. I did some personal research and found lots of stuff on the Organs at Lincoln Center. As was discussed in another message the Carnegie Hall Organ was cancelled again-- and I say again because there have been many attempts to get one in there over the life of the Hall--but, again, due to what those in power fear that the "fabulous" acoustics can be ruined. There is even an organ chamber or possible two which sit hollow. I'm not sure but I think they were in the original architectural plan and were actually there when the Hall was = built. But back to Lincoln Center and what little I remember there are some wonderful photos of the installation of the (can't remember the builder-shame on me) organ in Alice Tully Hall and Alice is among the = pipes and chests and all. She was fabulous. She fought to get the organ in there and insisted there be one. The pages of material also contain much on the selection of the organ committee and the selection of the organ builder. = (I am so embarrassed that I cannot remember the builder.) But nonetheless = there are lots of interesting pages on the matter and on the Organ that was to = go into what was then called Philharmonic Hall (now Avery Fischer). In fact, = an organ had been placed in Philharmonic and moved again due to acoustics and = I believe that may be the Aeolian Skinner that's at the Met--but don't bet = on that part. As for the Met organ, I do not have the stop list but it was included in the Archival records. It, in fact, it a three manual and is quite sufficient to handle a vast repertoire of organ literature. The Met = is huge and required a powerful organ, considering both the size of the hall and the location of the instrument, out of the way back stage. You may = know the name of who was the Met's full-time organist until his death in early-mid eights? John Grady who was also organist and choir director of = St. Patrick's Cathedral. I studied Gregorian Chant with him. I had asked him about the Met position and what it was like. He said he was required to be there for any opera that had an organ part and he was there faithfully. = The only operas I can think of off hand are Tosca and Faust but when I asked him, he of course, knew them all and I was quite surprised at the number = of operas that require organ. Anyway if anyone is interested the material is = at the Lincoln Center Archives and there is quire an extensive amount. The battles over the choice for ATH, the fights to keep the organ out of AFH = are worth the reading alone.   Robert Colasacco   Someone asked about the Metropolitan Opera House. There is a 1963 = Two-Manual   Aeolian-Skinner organ backstage, still in use, I believe, of a somewhat special design for operatic requirements, with no thought of it ever = needing   to play the organ repertoire. There was a highly informative thread about this on Piper-L some time ago, and again, that should be easy to find in = the   list archives.  
(back) Subject: Frank, Howells, Telemann and Peeters From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Fri, 12 Nov 1999 13:15:21 -0600   Am looking for small preludes/pieces to serve as incidental music or "filler" at various places in the service. Can anyone advise me as to whether any of the following are worthwhile music, i.e., having some = beauty and poignancy?   Telemann - 12 easy chorale preludes Franck - L'Organiste Howells' - Miniatures for Organ (I think originally piano pieces) Peeters - 60 short pieces   I am sure they have some merit, but am interested in opinions as to usability in an Episcopal service. I guess I am looking for more than = empty music - I want something I myself would find interesting and worth = listening to.   I thank 'ee.   Glenda Sutton        
(back) Subject: Re: Metropolitan Opera House From: Alan Freed <afreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 12 Nov 1999 14:36:15 -0500   Kuhn, of Zurich.   Alan Freed   > From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> > > installation of the (can't remember the > builder-shame on me) organ in Alice Tully Hall    
(back) Subject: Re: Frank, Howells, Telemann and Peeters From: Randolph Runyon <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Fri, 12 Nov 1999 14:53:01 -0500 (EST)   Glenda wrote:   >Am looking for small preludes/pieces to serve as incidental music or >"filler" at various places in the service. Can anyone advise me as to >whether any of the following are worthwhile music, i.e., having some = beauty >and poignancy? > >Telemann - 12 easy chorale preludes >Franck - L'Organiste >Howells' - Miniatures for Organ (I think originally piano pieces) >Peeters - 60 short pieces > >I am sure they have some merit, but am interested in opinions as to >usability in an Episcopal service. I guess I am looking for more than = empty >music - I want something I myself would find interesting and worth = listening >to.   HI, Glenda. Glad your recital went so well. Congratulations!   Some (about 20%, in my opinion) of the Franck are good. I have several volumes of Peeters chorale preludes, but I'm assuming this is something different. Of his chorale preludes, which tend to be 2-3 minutes, some = are very nice. Don't know the Howells or Telemann. But I love a little-known collection by Andre' Fleury, 24 Pieces, I think they're called. = Originally for harmonium, like Vierne's, and some are stunningly beautiful. The Rheinberger Trios, of course. Are you looking for one-minutes pieces, though, as opposed to two-minute ones?   Randy Runyon organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Cincinnati, Ohio      
(back) Subject: Re: Metropolitan Opera House From: "ray ahrens" <ray_ahrens@hotmail.com> Date: Fri, 12 Nov 1999 12:11:53 PST   There was an article in the TAO not that long ago(within the past year) about organs in opera. It also listed the Met specification: a surprisingly smallish 2man. Pedal had no independant ranks, all manual extensions. Germanic-looking great, Frenchified swell.       >As for the Met organ, I do not have the stop list but it was >included in the Archival records. It, in fact, it a three manual and is >quite sufficient to handle a vast repertoire of organ literature. The Met =   >is >huge and required a powerful organ, considering both the size of the hall >and the location of the instrument, out of the way back stage. You may = know >the name of who was the Met's full-time organist until his death in >early-mid eights? John Grady who was also organist and choir director of >St. >Patrick's Cathedral. I studied Gregorian Chant with him. I had asked him >about the Met position and what it was like. He said he was required to = be >there for any opera that had an organ part and he was there faithfully. = The >only operas I can think of off hand are Tosca and Faust but when I asked >him, he of course, knew them all and I was quite surprised at the number = of >operas that require organ. Anyway if anyone is interested the material is =   >at >the Lincoln Center Archives and there is quire an extensive amount. The >battles over the choice for ATH, the fights to keep the organ out of AFH >are >worth the reading alone. > >Robert Colasacco > >Someone asked about the Metropolitan Opera House. There is a 1963 >Two-Manual > >Aeolian-Skinner organ backstage, still in use, I believe, of a somewhat >special design for operatic requirements, with no thought of it ever >needing > >to play the organ repertoire. There was a highly informative thread about >this on Piper-L some time ago, and again, that should be easy to find in >the > >list archives. > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >   ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Frank, Howells, Telemann and Peeters From: Evelyn Rowe <efrowe@mindspring.com> Date: Fri, 12 Nov 1999 16:36:34 -0500   Can't tell you about the others, but the Franck book is *boring* -- not up to his usual standard at all.   At 01:15 PM 11/12/1999 -0600, Glenda wrote: >Am looking for small preludes/pieces to serve as incidental music or >"filler" at various places in the service. Can anyone advise me as to >whether any of the following are worthwhile music, i.e., having some = beauty >and poignancy? > >Telemann - 12 easy chorale preludes >Franck - L'Organiste >Howells' - Miniatures for Organ (I think originally piano pieces) >Peeters - 60 short pieces > >I am sure they have some merit, but am interested in opinions as to >usability in an Episcopal service. I guess I am looking for more than = empty >music - I want something I myself would find interesting and worth = listening >to. > >I thank 'ee. > >Glenda Sutton > > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Music, Church, Sport, Amateurism, Professionalism. From: "Karl E. Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersv.edu> Date: Fri, 12 Nov 1999 18:05:11 -0500 (EST)     I "resonate" greatly with this topic in several regards. Several points:   1. Let's start with the sports topic: Alan Freed states so well regarding participating in sports," we'd be better off if we did." Yes! Now in retirement years, I continue a very low-key program of recreational lifting and of somewhat more fervent distance running. I'm thankful to have knees that have withstood over 30 years of running over and beyond my schooling and Army years. My personal physician and his nursing staff make all sorts of happy faces and comments when they take my blood pressure or pulse rate and listen to my lungs, and with a momentary running-induced injury currently under physical therapy, my physician is crystal clear that he wants to solve the problem itself, as opposed to taking me off the road. (I'm a road runner.) Said he last week, "If I take you off the road, I'll age you ten years in one year's worth of time." (!!!) Love the guy for this attitude toward me. I can't wait to get back into my Nikes!   2. amateurism: Too often we Americans carry on a subtle, likely sub- conscious pride trip in the form of claiming to be critical of what others do, whether in music, drama, sports, etc., etc, and then priding ourselves that we're not satisfied except with the "best." Far too many Lancaster PA music-lovers don't attend opera and symphonic performances by the local groups because "they just don't sound like the Philadelphia Orchestra," and I'd rather go to Philadelphia to hear "the best." Quite candidly, local amateur musical groups like the amateur opera company and the per- service community symphony orchestra do quite creditable performances of fine music, admittedly not at the level of refinement one hears from fully professioanl forces but nonetheless very adequate performances.   It's a subtle but far too real "pride trip" to convince both ourselves and others that these local performances are not good enough for us. The same logic would find organists insisting on hearing only Thomas Murray or John Weaver or Gerre Hancock or David Craighead or Marilyn Keiser or Alan Morrison or Ken Cowan or "you name them" in recitals. What wrong with hearing Bach or Widor et al played by a local organist giving it his best shot on an organ perhaps marginally competent to the program but hearing the music itself in its essence? I'll never play like any of those, but I'd like to think that I've brought the composers and their music to life for those who went out of their way to hear me in recital.   Sure, I do go out of my way to see/hear Mike Mussina, Alan Morrison, Curt Schilling, John Weaver, the A-Rod, David Craighead, Derek Jeter, Thomas Murray--and MOST ESPECIALLY JAMIE MOYER--let's hear it for Jamie Moyer and the Mariners!!!!--on occasion, but it's perhaps more exciting to watch the Reading (PA) Phils, a AA farm team, or to hear relatively local organists who love their art and, like double-A baseball players, give it all they've got with hopes of doing their very best. That's why I enjoy hearing high school bands/choruses/orchestras with teachers/conductors who lead them beyond the Joyce Eilers junk level of repertoire and do really fine stuff in serious attempts at good quality, whether a good concert march, a renaissance motet, the overture to _Der Meistersinger_, etc. That is at once an experience in good art and in controling and improving the human condition.   Take this to the level of a parish choir, so often an amateur group, though hopefully with a choirmaster of real taste and capability. I worked carefully last night at Edward Elgar's "Ave Maria," Op. 2, No. 2, with my choir, some of whom can hardly read music but who have learned the piece and are gradually and steadily learning music reading as well. Permit me to claim that these amateurs DO make lovely music which can inspire increased devotion when we sing it in church soon. I'll even claim that my singers' own spirituality and quality of life have deepened because of that piece and dozens others like it. Amateurism in sports, in music, in Christian education teaching, etc., etc., should be highly regarded, and we do well to spend less time watching others doing it and more time pursuing such worthy things ourselves. Sure, I enjoy watching Jamie Moyer pitch to the Red Sox and have gone far out of my way to see him do it. But after a while, if it's a choice of watching Jamie pitch or of the present Moyer guy going for a five or seven mile run, I'll go running, and Jamie can throw to Nomar Garciaparra et al just fine without me watching him. I don't think that's undue selfishness; I think it's responsible care and stewardship of the body and health the good Lord has given me.   We do well to cast off the idea that amateurs are not good enough for us who too often tend to hold our noses too high in the air.   Is this disdain for amateurs one of the reasons why fewer people are willing to become organists and serve in relatively amateur status, even though salaried? GO JAMIE! Cordially,   Dr. Karl E. Moyer alias, "Jamie, Jr." Lancaster PA    
(back) Subject: Re: Metropolitan Opera House From: Maynard Cuppy <cuppy.maynard@mcleodusa.net> Date: Fri, 12 Nov 1999 17:37:51 -0600       COLASACCO, ROBERT wrote:   > I > believe that may be the Aeolian Skinner that's at the Met-   I think that is the organ that is now in the Crystal Cathedral.   > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: Metropolitan Opera House From: "Phil Stimmel" <pca@sover.net> Date: Fri, 12 Nov 1999 18:44:16 -0500   When I was at Union Seminary's School of Sacred Music in the mid 60's, I recall Robert Baker discussing the organ at the Metropolitan Opera. He stated that it was designed specifically for those operas which called for an organ part (hence, it's rather strange disposition of stops). I = believe he also indicated that he been involved with its design, along with = several others. I believe he was also involved with the design of the organ for Lincoln Center's Philharmonic Hall (along with Claire Coci and Searle Wright)   Phil Stimmel   -----Original Message----- From: Maynard Cuppy <cuppy.maynard@mcleodusa.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Friday, November 12, 1999 6:40 PM Subject: Re: Metropolitan Opera House     > > >COLASACCO, ROBERT wrote: > >> I >> believe that may be the Aeolian Skinner that's at the Met- > >I think that is the organ that is now in the Crystal Cathedral. > >> "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >> PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >> HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >> List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >> Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >> Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Metropolitan Opera House From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Fri, 12 Nov 1999 17:50:01   At 05:37 PM 11/12/1999 -0600, you wrote:   >> I >> believe that may be the Aeolian Skinner that's at the Met- > >I think that is the organ that is now in the Crystal Cathedral.   Yes, the =C6-S is at the Glass of Crass...after being slathered with marinar= a sauce. A tragic fate for a great later-era =C6-S work, IMHO.   dB