PipeChat Digest #1158 - Saturday, November 13, 1999
 
Re: Metropolitan Opera House
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersv.edu>
Franck L'Organiste Revisited
  by "bud" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: Music, Church, Sport, Amateurism, Professionalism.
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Music, Church, Sport, Amateurism, Professionalism.
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Frank, Howells, Telemann and Peeters
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Xpost: Recital Lecture/Demonstration
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Music, Church, Amateurism, Professionalism.
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Metropolitan Opera House From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersv.edu> Date: Fri, 12 Nov 1999 20:30:46 -0400   Charlie Callahan's second book on the Aeolian-Skinner firm includes = the stoplist of the Met Opera organ. Cordially,   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA   ---------- >From: "ray ahrens" <ray_ahrens@hotmail.com> >To: pipechat@pipechat.org >Subject: Re: Metropolitan Opera House >Date: Fri, Nov 12, 1999, 4:11 PM >   > There was an article in the TAO not that long ago(within the past year) > about organs in opera. It also listed the Met specification: a > surprisingly smallish 2man. Pedal had no independant ranks, all manual > extensions. Germanic-looking great, Frenchified swell. > > > >>As for the Met organ, I do not have the stop list but it was >>included in the Archival records. It, in fact, it a three manual and is >>quite sufficient to handle a vast repertoire of organ literature. The = Met >>is >>huge and required a powerful organ, considering both the size of the = hall >>and the location of the instrument, out of the way back stage. You may = know >>the name of who was the Met's full-time organist until his death in >>early-mid eights? John Grady who was also organist and choir director of >>St. >>Patrick's Cathedral. I studied Gregorian Chant with him. I had asked him >>about the Met position and what it was like. He said he was required to = be >>there for any opera that had an organ part and he was there faithfully. = The >>only operas I can think of off hand are Tosca and Faust but when I asked >>him, he of course, knew them all and I was quite surprised at the number = of >>operas that require organ. Anyway if anyone is interested the material = is >>at >>the Lincoln Center Archives and there is quire an extensive amount. The >>battles over the choice for ATH, the fights to keep the organ out of AFH >>are >>worth the reading alone. >> >>Robert Colasacco >> >>Someone asked about the Metropolitan Opera House. There is a 1963 >>Two-Manual >> >>Aeolian-Skinner organ backstage, still in use, I believe, of a somewhat >>special design for operatic requirements, with no thought of it ever >>needing >> >>to play the organ repertoire. There was a highly informative thread = about >>this on Piper-L some time ago, and again, that should be easy to find in >>the >> >>list archives. >> >> >>"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >>PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >>HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >>List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >>Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >>Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >> > > ______________________________________________________ > Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >  
(back) Subject: Franck L'Organiste Revisited From: bud <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 12 Nov 1999 18:16:26 -0800     Here's the problem with the Franck, at least the original edition (Kalmus reprint): you have to transcribe the pitch designations from the French = Harmonium to the pipe organ ... I've lost my copy of the later Tournemire edition, = which added some spurious stuff not in the original, but I think he either = rewrote the pieces at the actual pitches, or indicated what the pitches were supposed = to be. You CAN'T play them as written from the original edition without referring = to the table of French Harmonium registrations in the front of the original = edition, or they ARE boring at best, and truly weird in some places.   Franck was a genius at exploiting the divided stops of a one-manual = harmonium to achieve effects normally only possible on a two-manual organ ... when he = calls for a 4' stop in the left hand and writes in the bottom of the keyboard = and a 16' stop in the right hand and writes in the top of the keyboard, what = actually happens is that both hands are playing at the same actual pitch, one over = top of the other, as they would on a two-manual pipe organ.   There's more to L'Organiste than meets the eye (grin).   Cheers,   Bud   Evelyn Rowe wrote:   > Can't tell you about the others, but the Franck book is *boring* -- not = up > to his usual standard at all. >    
(back) Subject: Re: Music, Church, Sport, Amateurism, Professionalism. From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Fri, 12 Nov 1999 20:06:17   At 06:05 PM 11/12/1999 -0500, you wrote:   >2Far too many Lancaster PA music-lovers don't attend opera and symphonic >performances by the local groups because "they just don't sound like the >Philadelphia Orchestra," and I'd rather go to Philadelphia to hear "the >best."<snip>   So what? If I were in the Pennsy Lancaster, and had the Philadelphia = close enough at hand, especially back in the Ormandy days, I would have done the same thing! They were, and are, "the best". Why fool around?   I grew up in Riverside, CA, which had a volunteer symphony of long standing. I did attend many concerts, being especially entertained by the histrionics of their longtime conductor, a rather Wagnerian fellow named Guthrie. Then, to hear what it was probably REALLY supposed to sound = like, I'd venture west to Los Angeles to hear the Philharmonic at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. It's always "best" to hear the best...even if the "best" in this case was simply "better"!   DeserTBoB Lancaster, >>CA<<   ....which has NO musical facilities other than what can be had on FM = radio, or in my copious collection of Ormandy recordings on Columbia.      
(back) Subject: Re: Music, Church, Sport, Amateurism, Professionalism. From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Fri, 12 Nov 1999 20:11:06   At 06:05 PM 11/12/1999 -0500, you wrote:   >Far too many Lancaster PA music-lovers don't attend opera and symphonic >performances by the local groups because "they just don't sound like the >Philadelphia Orchestra," and I'd rather go to Philadelphia to hear "the >best."<snip>   So what? If I were in the Pennsy Lancaster, and had the Philadelphia = close enough at hand, especially back in the Ormandy days, I would have done the same thing! They were, and are, "the best". Why fool around?   I grew up in Riverside, CA, which had a volunteer symphony of long standing. I did attend many concerts, being especially entertained by the histrionics of their longtime conductor, a rather Wagnerian fellow named Guthrie. Then, to hear what it was probably REALLY supposed to sound = like, I'd venture west to Los Angeles to hear the Philharmonic at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. It's always "best" to hear the best...even if the "best" in this case was simply "better"!   DeserTBoB Lancaster, >>CA<<   ....which has NO musical facilities other than what can be had on FM = radio, or in my copious collection of Ormandy recordings on Columbia.      
(back) Subject: Re: Frank, Howells, Telemann and Peeters From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sat, 13 Nov 1999 00:01:50 -0500 (EST)   Brenda, I would like to recommend 29 Short Preludes, opus 59, by Carl Nielsen. When he says "short" he means it. They are generally about 16 measures or so and vary in form from contemplative to processional type music. They can be grouped into "suites" by relative keys and are all unique and contemporary sounding (although from 1929) without being unpleasant to the average ear. They also offer numerous registration possibilities.   Other excellent collections include 12 Fughettas (opus 123a and b), and Ten Trios (opus 49) by Josef Rheinberger. They are short, but very well crafted pieces, and are very interesting to play and hear.   bruce cornely ~:~:~ rohrschok8@webtv.net gainesville, florida    
(back) Subject: Xpost: Recital Lecture/Demonstration From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sat, 13 Nov 1999 00:32:54 -0500 (EST)   12 November 99 --- Holy Faith Catholic Church, Gainesville FL   The recital was presented for the Gainesville AGO Chapter as a demonstration of the tonal finishing recently completed on the 1982 Moller by George Bozeman.   Program   Prelude in A-major -- J S Bach : Pastorale -- Alec Rowley a) Gt: Waldflote 2 (played 1 and 2 octaves lower); Sw: Viole de Gambe 8, Flachflote 4; Ped: sw/pd b) Sw: VdG 8, Fflote 4 c) Rohrflote 8, tremulant (solo 8va on Rfl), chorale + Fl 4; d) as in "a" : Folktune -- Charles Callahan Sw: Trompette, Trem (+Flachflote 4 in 3rd phrase); Gr: Principal; Pd; Subbass 16, Offenflote 8 : Meditation -- Nicholas Choveaux Gr: Bourdon (solo); Sw: Rohrflote (+ VdG & Flachflote 4); Pd: Subass 16, sw/pd (A - Gr & Sw; B - Sw; A' - Gr; B' - Gr/Sw) : Festival Procession -- Richard Strauss Gr: Principal 8, Octave 4; Sw: Rohrflote, VdG 8, Flachflote 4, Trompette; Pd: Principal 16, Subbass 16, Offenflote 8, Choral Bass 4 (at beginning, increasing throughout) : Prelude in "suite" form -- Carl Nielsen Taken from the collection, 29 Short Preludes, opus 59 (1929), preludes 3, 23 and 5 are arranged into a "suite." This collection offers the ability to mix and match at will, and is an excellent study in improvisation and composition. They are scored for manuals alone; pedal may be added ad lib. a - # 3 Gr: Principal 8, Octave 2, Waldflote 2, sw/gr 16; Sw: Rohrflote, VdG 8, Flachflote 4, Principal 2, Quintflote 1-1/3 b - #23 Gr: Principal 8, sw/gr; Sw: Trompette 8 c - # 5 Sw: Viole de Gambe 8, Tremulant d - # 3 Gr: - as in "a" + Fagot 16, sw/gr 8 (-16); Sw: as in "a" + Trompette i : Trio and Fugue -- Josef Rheinberger Trio (from 10 Trios, opus 49) - Gr: Bourdon 8; Sw: Flachflote 2, 1-1/3, tremulant (16va) Fugue (from 12 Fughettas, opus 123b) Gr: Principal 8, Octave, sw/gr; Sw: Principal 2, Quintflote 1-1/3; Pd: Principal 16, Offenflote 8, Choral Bass 4 : Aquarelle -- Frederick Delius Sw: Viole de Gambe, Celeste 8; Gr: Bourdon 8, sw/gr; Pd: sw/gr (+ & -) Subbass 16 : Suite Gothique, opus 25 -- Leon Boellmann Introduction-Chorale, Menuet Gothique, Priere a Notre-Dame, Toccata   ---------Specification - MP Moller '82 --Great: Principal 8 (new) Bourdon 8 Octave 4 Waldflote 2 Mixture III-IV (reconfigured) Fagotto 16 (duplexed from Pedal) Trompette-en-Chamade (West End)   --Swell: Rohrflote 8 Viole de Gambe 8 Viole Celeste 8 tc Flachflote 4 Principal 2 Quintflote 1-1/3 Tremulant Trompette-en-Chamade   --Pedal: Principal 16 (beards removed, softened) Subbass 16 Octave 8 (extension 16) Offenflote 8 Choral Bass 4 Fagotto 16 Fagotto 4 (extension 16)   --Couplers: Swell to Great 16 8 4 Swell to Swell 16 U 4 Great to Pedal 8 Swell to Pedal 8 4   The organ is installed in a loft at the front of the Nave; the Trompette-en-Chamade is placed over the West Door. The organ's console is located tot he right of the Chancel/Sanctuary.   bruce cornely ~:~:~ rohrschok8@webtv.net gainesville, florida    
(back) Subject: Music, Church, Amateurism, Professionalism. From: ManderUSA@aol.com Date: Sat, 13 Nov 1999 02:38:59 EST   In a message dated 11/12/99 6:05:38 PM Eastern Standard Time, kmoyer@marauder.millersv.edu writes:   << Far too many Lancaster PA music-lovers don't attend opera and symphonic performances by the = local groups because "they just don't sound like the Philadelphia Orchestra," and I'd rather go to Philadelphia to hear "the best." Quite candidly, local amateur musical groups like the amateur opera company and the per- service community symphony orchestra do quite creditable performances of fine music, admittedly not at the level of refinement one hears from fully professional forces but nonetheless very adequate performances. >>   I feel strongly about supporting the home team. If my totally volunteer = and amateur church choir presents something publically, it is the result of = hard work over a long period of time, and it will be at as high a standard as possible, limited only by the quality of my training, and the abilities of =   the singers, not by any lack of willingness on their parts to reach for as =   close to perfection as possible. Whether the result is a joy or an embarrassment is also partly up to whatever integrity, and will (and ears) = I possess. If, knowing the personnel, I suspect that only embarrassment is a =   possible outcome, then I need to allow the choir to focus only on the considerable task of presenting well the music for Sunday mornings. If we = do enter the public arena, we hope the community will support and enjoy our work, without reference to the fact that 35 miles to the southwest lies = all that New York City has to offer.   And for rather a strange reversal of all that has been said above, there = is the "Stamford Symphony Orchestra!" It is made up of a fairly stable group = of New York's best free lance players, all of whom I have seen and heard in = New York in their various guises. They rehearse only in New York, arrive on = the bus shortly before each concert, and leave quickly thereafter. They are = good, the programs are interesting, in a good hall, and they sell out here, at = half the cost of hearing something similar in New York, with ample parking and = no travel. It obviously works financially, and it does musically as well. = Hardly the "home team" in any sense. There is no genuine home team, and it is doubtful that such would be possible. A couple of decades ago, there was a =   "somewhat" local orchestra, conducted by none other than Skitch Henderson. = A handful of players were enthusiastic local people, but 3/4 of the = orchestra was brought in from The City to fill all the gaps, and the result was what =   you might expect. I don't know when the local people faded out, or were = faded out.   For whatever this might be worth,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com