PipeChat Digest #1161 - Tuesday, November 16, 1999
 
Re: How can the organist help in teaching Hymn-singing?
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Re: How can the organist help in teaching Hymn-singing (from     	Chorali
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
UPdates (fwd)
  by "R A Campbell" <rcampbel@U.Arizona.EDU>
All things bright and beatutiful
  by <Cantuar@aol.com>
Tom Murray @ CUBE, Japan w/RealAudio (X-post)
  by "Toku Ohbayashi" <t@orgel.com>
Re: Noisy prelude
  by "Jason D. Comet" <bombarde8@juno.com>
RE: How can the organist help in teaching Hymn-singing (from Choralist)?
  by "Karl E. Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersv.edu>
PipeDreams in Iowa
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
RE: PipeDreams in Iowa
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: Fw: Royce Hall SKinner (X-posted)
  by "Maynard Cuppy" <cuppy.maynard@mcleodusa.net>
Re: PipeDreams in Iowa
  by "Greg Corbett" <corbettg@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Tom Murray @ CUBE, Japan w/RealAudio (X-post)
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
RE: PipeDreams in Iowa
  by "Tim Byram-Wigfield" <t_byram-wigfield@jesus.cam.ac.uk>
 


(back) Subject: Re: How can the organist help in teaching Hymn-singing? From: Myosotis51@aol.com Date: Mon, 15 Nov 1999 08:20:43 EST   In a message dated 11/14/1999 9:38:44 PM Eastern Standard Time, budchris@earthlink.net writes:   << One could do worse than read John Wesley's directions for hymn-singing = to the congregation ... I don't have a Methodist Hymnal at hand, but I think they still print them in the front ... the Methodist equivalent of Father Rossini's "Don't scoop, slide, hum or growl" (grin). >>   Here they are:   I. Learn these tunes before you learn any others; afterwards learn as = many as you please.   II. Sing them exactly as they are printed here, without altering or = mending them at all; and if you have learned to sing them otherwise, unlearn it as =   soon as you can.   III. Sing all. See that you join with the congregation as frequently as = you can. Let not a slight degree of weakness or weariness hinder you. If it = is a cross to you, take it up, and you will find it a blessing.   IV. Sing lustily and with good courage. Beware of singing as if you were half dead, or half asleep; but lift up your voice with strength. Be no = more afraid of your voice now, nor more ashamed of its being heard, than when = you sung the songs of Satan.   V. Sing modestly. Do not bawl, so as to be heard above or distinct from = the rest of the congregation, that you may not destroy the harmony; but strive = to unite your voices together, so as to make one clear melodious sound.   VI. Sing in time. Whatever time is sung be sure to keep with it. Do not = run before nor stay behind it; but attend close to the leading voices, and = move therewith as exactly as you can; and take care not to sing too slow. This =   drawling way naturally steals on all who are lazy; and it is high time to drive it out from us, and sing all our tunes just as quick as we did at = first.   VII. Above all sing spiritually. Have an eye to God in every word you sing. Aim at pleasing him more than yourself, or any other creature. In order to do this attend strictly to the sense of what you sing, and see = that your heart is not carried away with the sound, but offered to God continually; so shall your singing be such as the Lord will aprove here, = and reward you when he cometh in the clouds of heaven.   From John Wesley's SELECT HYMNS, 1761.     Vicki Ceruti, Organist Center Moriches Methodist Church, NY  
(back) Subject: Re: How can the organist help in teaching Hymn-singing (=?ISO-8859-1?Q?from=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0?= Choralist)? From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 15 Nov 1999 10:52:35 -0500 (EST)   >Do you have any ideas for this Choralist > member on how the Organist can teach the > Art Hymn Singing? I think this is a two-pronged fork! There is the art of hymn playing, which is coupled with teaching the congregation how to follow the player. There is also the art of singing which can be be passed along to a congregation if they wish to learn.   When I was at Holy Faith RC, preservice time was often used to teach new hymns. This is a difficult time, because many of the congregation have not yet arrived and others who have come early did not do so to "go to school" as one lady so kindly put it. Overall, however, the congregation seemed to enjoy the learning experience, judging from afterservice comments.   One of the things I did was to "line" the hymn, with the congregation singing the phrase back to me. Sometimes at the conclusion of the phrase I would have them hold the last note and increase the volume until the sound was rich and full. We also did this with each section of the congregation (the room was divided into four sets of pews) holding a different note. The sound was incredible (no carpet!!) and the congregation was almost always surprised at the result. The main thing to teach is the art of projection and singing with strength. Many congregations simply sing leisurely, which does not produce a robust sound. I recall the first funeral I played after going to First UMC. When I started playing the prelude there were two people in the nave. The nave cannot be seen from the console, so when the minister announced the first hymn I had no idea how many people were there. I began the hymn with GPS flutes 8 and 4 and the Great Principal 8. The singing was mildly strong, so on the next stanza I added Octave 4 and flute 2... the singing volume increased. By the final stanza the Swell reeds were on (box closed) and the room was ringing with sound. When the sermon time came, I moved from the console to a chair behind the lectern from which I could see the congregation. There were only about 50 people in the nave.   I think the best way to teach a congregation "the art of singing" is to work with them without accompaniment, beginning in unison. After unison singing is strong, the next group to work with is the low voices, teaching them the basic formula for either following or creating a bass line. This is basically where the men want to sing. I am firmly against the present trend to forcing everyone to the melody; people (even nonsingers) know that there is more to music than the melody.   >I remember that I myself always had certain > difficulties in bringing new hymns to the > congregation's notice. In my present UM church, we do a hymn-anthem each week at the offering, using a mixture of familiar hymns and the occasional new one that we want to introduce. We also using hymns sung by the choir as preludes occasionally. When we sang "Helmsley" two weeks ago, I played the hymn through as an introduction with the melody on the Trompette. The first stanza was in unison, and played in octaves on the organ, the second stanza again solo'd to melody, and the third and fourth stanzas were played in 4-parts. The congregation did fine. We will sing it again in a few weeks, and then again in a month. Congregations are not nearly as slow as Vatican-II would have us believe, especially those who have a tradition of hymnsinging. The main problem in congregations with strong hymnsinging traditions is too many new hymns and not enough of the golden oldies such as "When Morning Gilds the Skies", "O Worship the King", "Joyful, Joyful," etc, etc. There are pockets of the Episcopal church where the American gospel hymns are included in this category.     bruce cornely ~:~:~ rohrschok8@webtv.net gainesville, florida    
(back) Subject: UPdates (fwd) From: R A Campbell <rcampbel@U.Arizona.EDU> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 1999 09:03:25 -0700 (MST)   Subject: UPdates   AcoustiCDigest News - http://acousticdigest.com   We have added a few more classical composers to our database.   Chamber Music magazine has chosen http://acoustiCDigest.com as one of their top 50 music websites for an article that will appear in their JAN/FEB issue. We thank them.     ______________________________________________________________________ To unsubscribe, write to AcoustiCDigest-unsubscribe@listbot.com Start Your Own FREE Email List at http://www.listbot.com/      
(back) Subject: All things bright and beatutiful From: Cantuar@aol.com Date: Mon, 15 Nov 1999 13:06:05 EST       "All Things Dull And Ugly" from Monty Python's Contractual Obligations = Album All things dull and ug-ly, All creatures, short and squat, All things rude and na-sty, The Lord God made the lot. Each little snake that poisons, Each little wasp that stings, He made their prudish venom, He made their horrid wings. All things sick and cancerous, All evil great and small, All things foul and dangerous, The Lord God made them all. Each nasty little hornet, Each beastly little squid, Who made the spiky urchin? Who made the sharks? He did! All things scant and ulcerous, All pox both great and small, Putrid, foul and gangrenous, The Lord God made them all. Amen.        
(back) Subject: Tom Murray @ CUBE, Japan w/RealAudio (X-post) From: Toku Ohbayashi <t@orgel.com> Date: Tue, 16 Nov 1999 04:54:54 +0900   Dear List,   I have updated my website with an hour's RealAudio music performed by Tom Murray. They were recorded live at the CUBE concert hall, Shiroishi, Japan, earlier this year. The programme:   Grieg: Peer Gynt Suite #1 (complete) Hollins: A Song of Sunshine Durufle: Suite (complete) Debussy: Arabesque #1   Go directly to: http://www.orgel.com/cube/music-e.html   .... hope you enjoy the music!   Yours,   Toku Ohbayashi "Pipe Organs and Music" http://www.orgel.com/    
(back) Subject: Re: Noisy prelude From: "Jason D. Comet" <bombarde8@juno.com> Date: Tue, 2 Nov 1999 03:46:08 -0500   >Anything that any of you have done to modify behavior in a case like >this? >I mean, I can always just play louder or choose more aggressive >preludes.   After visiting Wanamker GC Organ this summer, I have started experimenting with String preludes. I am blessed to have several string ranks on this Moller Organ: SWELL: 8 Viola da Gamba 8 Salicional 8 T.C. Celeste 4 Fugara GREAT: 8 Dulciana   along with S/S 16' & 4' and S/G 16', 8', & 4' and G/G 4'   I have done a lot of Preludes with these strings with the shades closed and then open it just about full with the 4' Stopped Flute on the Swell amd 4' Oboe Clarion (soft) also on the Swell and the Tremulant. It sends chills up their spines (and I almost faint) because it is so Gorgeous that I can hear EVERYBODY stop talking. Then I bring it back down to the Salicional and Celeste with no couplers and shades closed. By then, they are so in awe that it is dead silent in the sanctuary. The first week, I got a standing ovation after about 10 seconds of silence. However, they are starting to expect that now so I have to try to have either alterations or additions to the organ. I have intermingled many Bach pieces and such between weeks, but it's been a while since I started that they are becoming immune to my power.     Jason Comet bombarde8@juno.com |\ Organist/Choir Director | | 2/22 M.P. Moller pipe organ O ~22 member choir (increased several more)   ___________________________________________________________________ Get the Internet just the way you want it. Free software, free e-mail, and free Internet access for a month! Try Juno Web: http://dl.www.juno.com/dynoget/tagj.  
(back) Subject: RE: How can the organist help in teaching Hymn-singing (from Choralist)? From: "Karl E. Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersv.edu> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 1999 16:17:12 -0500 (EST)     The organist, even if not the choir director, can and, I think, SHOULD, write informative and encouraging articles in the parish newsletter and/or worship folder. For example, in my current process of teaching "Thaxted" I refer with relish to the "Jupiter" mov't of Holst's _The Planets_, from which it comes, encouraging my readers to buy the CD and listen to it. I'd like to think that such highlighting increases a perception of interest in and value of the tune and its associated text. I've also made a point to note its broad British style, as opposed to singing 16th-17th century German chorales in their original rhythms with real folk-song-like vigor--which we do with relish as well. In drawing attention to the specific style traits, I hope once again to highlight knowledge and interest in congregational hymns generally, as well as new hymns in particular, all hopefully yielding more interest in singing them.   Having traveled to Helmsley in Yorkshire and taken various pictures there of the parish church, castle, town square, etc., I'll again put them up on my bulletin board the week we sing "Helmsley" in church.   I'd like to think that such sings of interest, along with effective playing of hymns, helps make hymn singing more vibrant and encourages people to learn new hymns,so long as we don't teach too many at one time and DO TEACH them rather than just use new hymns once and let them "ride out into the sunset."   While not everyone responds well to evidence of things of value, I think more people than not DO get interested in things of value when the values are made evident to them--and then have a better basis on which to choose valuable things as opposed to junk, trite congregational song. Cordially, Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA    
(back) Subject: PipeDreams in Iowa From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 1999 15:19:15   Did anyone else catch the Iowa TO extravaganza on PipeDreams last night? Actually, the program uplinked on the 8th, and just happened to play last night in the Los Angeles area. Three Cedar Rapids organs were featured, a 1927 Wurlitzer in its original home at the Paramount, a Wangerin/Barton, also an original installation (1928?...I didn't write it down..), at the former RKO, and a 1929 Skinner at Coe College, which was originally Cedar Rapids' municipal organ. The show had copious amounts of comment from = that guy on that *other* list...you know, the snobby one, = pip-ARGUE-l...Kelzenberg!   The Wangerin/Barton was by far the best sounding of the three, having a great lush sound that was decidedly not from any Wurlitzer. In fact, I didn't think it sounded even like other Bartons I've heard. It was truly unique and most pleasant! The Wurlie sounded rather anemic to me, = probably in part due to the painfully slow trems. Host Michael Barone even made note of that in his commentary. The Skinner is in a rather dead hall at Coe College, and although sounding nice, it was a bit beepy and blatty in the uninspired acoustic, with the traditional lack of upperwork not = helping much at all.   A great TO show, all in all, and we can only hope for more in the future! Hats off to Michael Barone and the NPR crew, and...yes...Kelzenberg for putting the whole thing together!   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: RE: PipeDreams in Iowa From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 1999 16:39:10 -0600   Bob:   That would be M[innesota]PR. Great show. You can listen on the MPR Website.   Peter   -----Original Message----- From: Bob Scarborough [mailto:desertbob@rglobal.net] Sent: Monday, November 15, 1999 9:19 AM To: Theatreorgans-L@theatreorgans.com Cc: PipeChat Subject: PipeDreams in Iowa     A great TO show, all in all, and we can only hope for more in the future! Hats off to Michael Barone and the NPR crew, and...yes...Kelzenberg for putting the whole thing together!   DeserTBoB   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: Royce Hall SKinner (X-posted) From: Maynard Cuppy <cuppy.maynard@mcleodusa.net> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 1999 17:42:57 -0600   Funny you should mention this piece now. I just heard a wonderful = performance of it last Wednesday night with the University of Iowa Symphony Orchestra, = Dr. William LaRue Jones conducting, and Dr. Delbert Disselhorst, organist, at = the 74-rank Casavant (plus 2 digital 32' ranks). The other half of the program = was the Saint-Saens 3rd Symphony. A thoroughly enjoyable evening, even though = it was marred by some rude mothers who insisted on bringing small children = (under 10) out to a concert at an hour when they probably should have been in = bed. (Sorry, I'm not trying to start a thread here on concert etiquette or = anything else). Maynard   VEAGUE wrote:   > Bud... Wish I could go hear Jongens' Concertante --I LOVE that piece! > > Rick > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: bud <budchris@earthlink.net> > To: organchat <organchat@onelist.com>; pipechat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Sunday, November 14, 1999 4:43 PM > Subject: Royce Hall SKinner (X-posted) > > > Next Tuesday at 8 p.m., University Organist Thomas Harmon will > > re-inaugurate the mighty UCLA Royce Hall Skinner (virtually demolished > > by the Northridge earthquake in 1994) with the Jongen Symphonie > > Concertante and Mark Carlson's Concerto for Organ and Orchestra (1997) > > with the UCLA Philharmonia under Jon Robertson. Tickets: $14. Phone: > > (310) 825-2101. > > > > There's an extensive piece on it in today's LA Times Calendar section. > > The organ has been enlarged from four to five manuals (new console by > > Robert Turner), and from 80 to 104 ranks (an additional division ... = the > > article doesn't say what), but it does say that additional ranks were > > added so the organ can better play baroque and contemporary music. > > > > I can't go, but if anybody in So Cal DOES, I'd LOVE to hear about it. > > > > Cheers, > > > > Bud > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: PipeDreams in Iowa From: Greg Corbett <corbettg@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 1999 19:31:36 -0800   Ditto, though sharing the computer with the wife (while she did word processing), the show came through.   I was beautiful, well worth listening to, and sure to be a regular from here on.   Greg.    
(back) Subject: Re: Tom Murray @ CUBE, Japan w/RealAudio (X-post) From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Mon, 15 Nov 1999 22:35:31 -0500   Many thanks to those responsible for sending such a neat RealTime Virtual Organ Concert. I played a few selections on it -I'm a Wagner fan, and have it in my "Favourites" list.   Rick      
(back) Subject: RE: PipeDreams in Iowa From: "Tim Byram-Wigfield" <t_byram-wigfield@jesus.cam.ac.uk> Date: Tue, 16 Nov 1999 08:44:16 -0000       > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of > Greg Corbett > Sent: 16 November 1999 03:32 > To: PipeChat > Subject: Re: PipeDreams in Iowa > > > Ditto, though sharing the computer with the wife (while she did word > processing), the show came through. > > I was beautiful,   I'm sure you are!   well worth listening to, and sure to be a regular from > here on. > > Greg. > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >