PipeChat Digest #1105 - Monday, October 4, 1999
 
Re: Musically named cars
  by "Bill" <WGWUTILS@webtv.net>
Re: Musically named cars
  by "jchabermaas" <opus1100@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Musically named cars
  by "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net>
Re: Musically named cars
  by "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net>
Re: Musically named cars
  by "Bill" <WGWUTILS@webtv.net>
Re: Musically named cars
  by "ray ahrens" <ray_ahrens@hotmail.com>
Re: Piano Advice Requested
  by "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: Piano Advice Requested
  by "Dr. Darryl Miller" <organdok@safari.net>
Re: Piano Advice Requested (Request From Gray)
  by <CHERCAPA@aol.com>
Re: Piano Advice Requested (Request From Gray)
  by "Gray King" <gking1@bellsouth.net>
Re: Musically named cars
  by "Adrianne Schutt" <maybe@pipcom.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Musically named cars From: WGWUTILS@webtv.net (Bill) Date: Sun, 3 Oct 1999 11:39:05 -0400 (EDT)   I never heard of a Moller motor car or cab - only taxi manufacturers in the U.S. were Yellow Coach which quite building taxi's in the mid 30's and Checker Motors (a Cord Industries company of Auburn Cord Dusenburg fame) which built cabs and munincipal buses from the 20's up until the early 80's (Kalamazoo, MI). For those interested (not music related, but historically interesting), ACD has a fantastic museum in Auburn, IN, in what was once their design lab - certainly worth a look-see whenever any of you are traviling through northern Indiana...   Bill W (whose grandfather, father and mother were all associated with ACD/Checker and have items on display at the museum).    
(back) Subject: Re: Musically named cars From: "jchabermaas" <opus1100@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sun, 3 Oct 1999 11:09:07 -0500     -----Original Message----- From: Bill <WGWUTILS@webtv.net> Subject: Re: Musically named cars     I never heard of a Moller motor car or cab -   During the early part of the century Matias Moller helped found the = Crawford Automobile Company and later bought out the other shareholders and renamed it the M. P. Moller Motor Car Company. The best known products were the Dagmar luxury sedan, named after one of Moller's daughters and the Luxor = taxicab. The auto firm stayed in business until after Matias's death in 1937. This information is found in Vol 1 of the Encyclopedia Of The American Theatre and can be found on pp 347 along with a picture of the Dagmar sedan.   jch      
(back) Subject: Re: Musically named cars From: Bob Loesch <rrloesch@jps.net> Date: Sun, 03 Oct 1999 09:08:53 -0700   At 12:55 AM 10/03/1999 -0500, Noel Stoutenburg wrote: >> It's not all tracker, though. The tires are pnematic. > >Since it uses a spark, this makes it "electro, pneumatic", and I argue >that to call it a "tracker" is misleading....   Well, when I take my dogs out in it, it has 'barkers'... ;-)     Regards,   Bob   http://www.jps.net/rrloesch   Time flies whether you're having fun or not!   The best things in life aren't THINGS.  
(back) Subject: Re: Musically named cars From: Bob Loesch <rrloesch@jps.net> Date: Sun, 03 Oct 1999 09:11:37 -0700   At 11:39 AM 10/03/1999 -0400, you wrote: >I never heard of a Moller motor car or cab - only taxi manufacturers in >the U.S. were Yellow Coach which quite building taxi's in the mid 30's >and Checker Motors     M. P. Moller did, indeed, build cars in Hagerstown, MD for a short time in the 1930s. His cars' badge had a facade of organ pipes. Quite = attractive, too. I can scan the photo from Junchen's "Encyclopedia of the American theatre organ" if any wish to see it...     Regards,   Bob   http://www.jps.net/rrloesch   Time flies whether you're having fun or not!   The best things in life aren't THINGS.  
(back) Subject: Re: Musically named cars From: WGWUTILS@webtv.net (Bill) Date: Sun, 3 Oct 1999 12:38:21 -0400 (EDT)   Moller Motor Cars - Boy! You can learn more every day - after 70-years, I thought I had run across ALL of the American brands. Thanks all.   Bet those Mollers REALLY had a set of pipes :-) Bill W.    
(back) Subject: Re: Musically named cars From: "ray ahrens" <ray_ahrens@hotmail.com> Date: Sun, 03 Oct 1999 11:56:35 PDT   Let's not forget about outboard boat motors, there's one made by Johnson called the "Tracker." Did Johnson and Son get out of the organ business?       ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Piano Advice Requested From: "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Sat, 2 Oct 1999 19:02:10 +0100   We have a Yamaha Concert Grand at school - its a beaut!!!   It obviously doesn't compare to the Steinway at the music school but if = the Steinways are Rolls Royce's, the Yamaha's are the Mercedes! (I couldn't think of any musical cars so I thought of this instead!!!)   Richard.    
(back) Subject: Re: Piano Advice Requested From: "Dr. Darryl Miller" <organdok@safari.net> Date: Sun, 03 Oct 1999 20:02:25 -0400   Richard, don't forget about checking with the local Steinway dealer for pianos that are used with the Steinway artists. From time-to-time some of 9's are retired from touring and sold. In fact, both of our 9' Steinway pianos are from the touring program.   Baldwin has a similar program. I don't know if Yamaka or Kawaii or any of the other piano manufacturers do similar things.   Yours,   Darryl by the Sea    
(back) Subject: Re: Piano Advice Requested (Request From Gray) From: CHERCAPA@aol.com Date: Sun, 3 Oct 1999 20:31:15 EDT   Dear Gray, I've seen Stieff pianos and played on some of them. I believe = that they were made in New York during the early 1900's as were most of the uprights. Most of these pianos are unbreakable and, in most cases, = unbeatable for sound. They were much better then the spinets of the 50"s and still better than the "consoles" of the 60's. TAken care of, they were a fine instrument. Unfortunately, most ended up in basements where the humidity warped the sound boards, softened the glue that held the ivory to the keys =   and made the keys stick. Or they wound up in a church recreation room = where they were abused. You have a fine instrument there which should last a lifetime. Sincerely, Paul P. Valtos  
(back) Subject: Re: Piano Advice Requested (Request From Gray) From: Gray King <gking1@bellsouth.net> Date: Mon, 04 Oct 1999 01:09:21 +0000   THATS THE NAME! Yes, Yes....someone did it. They named it! Glad to = hear that the piano can be a good one. Judging from the sound, I believe it is = really good one. I mean, this piano has not been tuned in 10 years and all but two = notes are relatively in tune. Only two are unbearable. The man has had it in a = very well controlled environment for the 10 years he has had it. He doesn't play, = but his wife does and she doesn't have the time anymore. The only reason he wants = to sell it is because they are building a new home and don't want to bother = with moving it since she doesn't play it anymore. Anyway, I believe that it is = a steal. It is spotless with the original finish still intact. Whoever had = it must have taken care of it. The action and all is new. The keys are new, = the hammers, and the strings. The thing that impresses me most about it is = the depth from the lid to the sounding board. It gives it such a booming and = brilliant sound even at its age. Thanks for all your help on this one.   Gray King Winston-Salem, NC     CHERCAPA@aol.com wrote:   > Dear Gray, I've seen Stieff pianos and played on some of them. I believe = that > they were made in New York during the early 1900's as were most of the > uprights. Most of these pianos are unbreakable and, in most cases, = unbeatable > for sound. They were much better then the spinets of the 50"s and still > better than the "consoles" of the 60's. TAken care of, they were a fine > instrument. Unfortunately, most ended up in basements where the humidity > warped the sound boards, softened the glue that held the ivory to the = keys > and made the keys stick. Or they wound up in a church recreation room = where > they were abused. You have a fine instrument there which should last a > lifetime. Sincerely, Paul P. Valtos > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: Musically named cars From: Adrianne Schutt <maybe@pipcom.com> Date: Mon, 04 Oct 1999 03:44:50 -0700   At 12:55 AM 10/3/99 -0500, Noel Stoutenburg wrote: > > > Geo Tracker > > It's not all tracker, though. The tires are pnematic. > >Since it uses a spark, this makes it "electro, pneumatic", and I argue >that to call it a "tracker" is misleading.... Well, maybe....but since a lot of them (mine included) spend a = lot of their time on 4x4 trails, I think "track"er is still more apt than "trail"er. ;)   The interesting bits of Chev/GMC/Geo Trackers are really Suzuki (thank goodness). Since Hammond organs are now made by Hammond-Suzuki, Trackers make perfect 4x4s for the drawbar-obsessed. ;)   Useless semi-related trivia time: from 1967 to 1969, Fiberfab made a car called the Valkyrie. Came with a Chevy 427 and a drag chute.   Have fun! Ad ;-> 2 Hammonds, 1 Suzuki with a Chevy grill