PipeChat Digest #1122 - Wednesday, October 20, 1999
 
Pipes v electric.
  by "paul austin" <paul.p.austin@talk21.com>
Organ rededication - Gouverneur NY 10.24.99 (x-post)
  by <CareyOrgan@aol.com>
Welte Philharmonic Player Pipe Organ
  by <TheOrganst@aol.com>
Re: Pipes v electric.
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: Pipes v electric.
  by <NFexec@aol.com>
Re: Pipes v electric.
  by "Jason McGuire" <jason@johannus-norcal.com>
Re: Pipes v electric.
  by "bud" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: Welte Philharmonic Player Pipe Organ
  by "bud" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: Pipes v electric.
  by "Blaine Ricketts" <blaineri@home.com>
Transcription Performers
  by "Jack Williams" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #1121 - 10/20/99
  by "richard r stein grumpy" <grumpy@gwis.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #1121 - 10/20/99
  by "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net>
Re: Transcription Performers
  by "Robert Horton" <GEMSHORN@UKANS.EDU>
Re: Transcription Performers
  by "Jack Williams" <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com>
Re: Transcription Performers
  by "Robert Horton" <GEMSHORN@UKANS.EDU>
Organ Transcriptions
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
 


(back) Subject: Pipes v electric. From: "paul austin" <paul.p.austin@talk21.com> Date: Wed, 20 Oct 1999 12:34:52 +0100   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0005_01BF1AF7.829DFEE0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Hello all.   I have just had a phone call from one of our church wardens regarding =3D the organ in our church. =3D20   We currently have a two manual pipe organ which is in good condition, is = =3D well maintained and is operating well. The church committees are now =3D working on what they call 'phase 3' and it includes the organ. They are = =3D considering removing the pipe organ to make more space in the vestry =3D area, and replacing it with an electronic. My feelings on this matter =3D are mixed.   One of the problems we have always had is getting the sound around the =3D church. The organ is currently situated in the Chancel, and most of the = =3D sound we loose up the tower before it reaches the congregation. The =3D result is that the organ and choir are at one speed, and the =3D congregation at another. One suggestion is that the speakers of an =3D electronic could be spread around the building to even out the sound. =3D This is only one problem of many.   Anyway, I am going to be invited to a meeting with church officials to =3D put my views forward. I would be grateful for any advice on this topic = =3D such as reasons for keeping our pipe organ as it is, bearing in mind it = =3D is in very good order and was fully restored only 10 years ago, but =3D remembering our problem with sound, and any advice on possible =3D replacements and where we should be looking for a good electronic, if =3D one exists!   I hope I have put this across clearly. If I have not let me know.   I look forward to hearing from you.   Paul Austin   paul.p.austin@talk21.com   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0005_01BF1AF7.829DFEE0 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META content=3D3D"text/html; charset=3D3Diso-8859-1" =3D http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.00.2314.1000" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Hello all.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>I have just had a phone call from one = =3D of our church=3D20 wardens regarding the organ in our church.&nbsp; </FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>We currently have a two manual pipe = =3D organ which is=3D20 in good condition, is well maintained and is operating well.&nbsp; The =3D church=3D20 committees are now working on what they call 'phase 3' and it includes =3D the=3D20 organ.&nbsp; They are considering removing the pipe organ to make more =3D space in=3D20 the vestry area, and replacing it with an electronic.&nbsp; My feelings = =3D on this=3D20 matter are mixed.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>One of the problems we have always = had =3D is getting=3D20 the sound around the church.&nbsp; The organ is currently situated in =3D the=3D20 Chancel, and most of the sound we loose up the tower before it reaches =3D the=3D20 congregation.&nbsp; The result is that the organ and choir are at one =3D speed, and=3D20 the congregation at another.&nbsp; One suggestion is that the speakers =3D of an=3D20 electronic could be spread around the building to even out the =3D sound.&nbsp; This=3D20 is only one problem of many.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Anyway, I am going to be invited to a = =3D meeting with=3D20 church officials to put my views forward.&nbsp; I would be grateful for = =3D any=3D20 advice on this topic such as reasons for keeping our pipe organ as it =3D is,=3D20 bearing in mind it is in very good order and was fully restored only 10 = =3D years=3D20 ago, but remembering our problem with sound, and any advice on = possible=3D20 replacements and where we should be looking for a good electronic, if =3D one=3D20 exists!</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>I hope I have put this across =3D clearly.&nbsp; If I=3D20 have not let me know.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>I look forward to hearing from =3D you.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Paul Austin</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2><A=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:paul.p.austin@talk21.com">paul.p.austin@talk21.com</A></FO= =3D NT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0005_01BF1AF7.829DFEE0--    
(back) Subject: Organ rededication - Gouverneur NY 10.24.99 (x-post) From: CareyOrgan@aol.com Date: Wed, 20 Oct 1999 08:41:30 EDT   First Presbyterian Church, 22 Church St., Gouverneur, NY will celebrate = the completion of the organ rebuilding project by the Carey Organ Company of = Troy NY this Sunday, October 24 at 4:00. The organ was built in 1920 by Tellers. Rebuilding included a new = console, solid state relay and combination action, and a complete tonal revision, = as well as necessary mechanical repairs. As the Carey Organ Company's Opus = 39R, it now has 34 ranks on three manuals (plus Echo) and pedal. Keith Williams, Business Manager of the Carey Organ Company, Organist/Choirmaster at St. Paul's Church in Troy, Alumnae Chapel Organist = at Emma Willard School, and Instructor in Organ at the College of St. Rose, = will perform selections by Boyvin and Bach, including the Toccata & Fugue in D Minor, BWV 565. Dr. James Autenrith, consultant for the project, will perform Handel's = organ Concerto "The Cuckoo & the Nightengale." Kathleen Buell, organist of the church, will perform Pachelbel's Ciacona = in D minor and the Boellmann Suite Gothique.   All are welcome, admission is free. For more information the church's telephone number is 315-287-0560.  
(back) Subject: Welte Philharmonic Player Pipe Organ From: TheOrganst@aol.com Date: Wed, 20 Oct 1999 09:41:48 EDT   I've just acquired my 11th organ for my house. YIKES! Does anyone on this list know anything about the Welte? Books? Diagrams? Etc.? It's 9 ranks, a beautiful carved and hand painted Mahogany console, with Deagon Harp and chimes. The pipe work is beautiful. The 3 reed stops are from Gottfried, Erie, PA. Any help would be appreciated.   Thanks.      
(back) Subject: Re: Pipes v electric. From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com Date: Wed, 20 Oct 1999 10:10:58 EDT   Dear Paul,   Who built your organ? How many ranks is it? And... Is it buried in = chambers?   First and foremost you should contact the builder of the instrument or = some well respected builders and present him/them with your problems. With the =   information you provided it is hard to believe that after such a huge expenditure, only ten years ago, that the vestry would really want to = chuck the pipe organ all together... If so, they needn't be on the vestry and = they should have their heads examined. Also, keep in mind that digital organs = can be a good reproduction of pipe sounds, BUT.... they are just that, reproductions. A good analogy would be: I have a baby who cries at night, =   messes itself, and must be fed all the time and I am considering replacing =   him with a Cabbage Patch Doll, who is just as cute and presents none of = the headaches. Sounds ludicrous ... right?   From your description of the situation I assume that the organ is in = chambers and is at least of modest size. With that in mind one might see if the chambers could be opened up to allow more sound to escape or escape in a = more direct ways. Which brings to mind the question -- is this a divided = chancel with chambers on either side speaking directly at each other?   Another possibility would be to relocate the organ in the room. Perhaps, = in a transept, rear gallery, smack dab in the front of the chancel and = speaking directly into the nave, etc....   The possibilities are there just search them out, get creative, and most = of all -- get expert advice.   John  
(back) Subject: Re: Pipes v electric. From: NFexec@aol.com Date: Wed, 20 Oct 1999 10:37:22 EDT   In a message dated 10/20/1999 10:12:47 AM Eastern Daylight Time, DRAWKNOB@aol.com writes:   << Another possibility would be to relocate the organ in the room. = Perhaps, in a transept, rear gallery, smack dab in the front of the chancel and = speaking directly into the nave, etc.... The possibilities are there just search them out, get creative, and most = of all -- get expert advice. >>   I would agree with the above --- one thing you might consider is doing a cost/benefit analysis for your board. That is, get expert (and ones you = can trust!) quotes on 1) removing the organ, redesigning some space for more vestry, and purchasing and installing an electronic. I assume the income from selling the organ (?) would offset this cost. Then, get quotes on 2) =   redesigning the organ chambers and/or actually moving them so the organ speaks out more properly. Of course depending on the complexities = involved, this may weigh in favor of getting the electronic. However, it may be = worth a shot - I would include not only the monetary cost, but the benefit of having a genuine pipe organ --- something that is hard to put a dollar = sign with some, I am sure! -- but it may be an interesting comparison. Good = luck!   Doug  
(back) Subject: Re: Pipes v electric. From: "Jason McGuire" <jason@johannus-norcal.com> Date: Wed, 20 Oct 1999 08:04:05 -0700   > THIS MESSAGE IS IN MIME FORMAT. Since your mail reader does not = understand this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.   --MS_Mac_OE_3023251445_59781_MIME_Part Content-type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit     Paul,   Once you and your church have reached a decision about which way to go = (pipe restoration or relocation) or electronic, I suggest listening very = carefully to what is available. I just installed a new Makin 3-manual here in = northern California and it is so pipe-like it is scary. Everyone that has heard it = so far has said "it sounds just like a pipe organ." I do not know where you = are located, but if you are anywhere close to the west coast it would be worth = a visit to hear and play this organ as part of your decision making process.   If one has a fine pipe organ and can solve placement problems so that the organ meets the musical and sound needs of the church, then retaining it = is likely the best bet, unless funds prohibit this. But, once you've heard a Makin you will know that there is a musically solid and pipe-like alternative that is head and shoulders above the rest.   Best regards, Jason McGuire     --MS_Mac_OE_3023251445_59781_MIME_Part Content-type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Re: Pipes v electric.</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY BGCOLOR=3D3D"#FFFFFF"> <BLOCKQUOTE><TT><BR> Paul,<BR> <BR> Once you and your church have reached a decision about which way to go = (pip=3D e restoration or relocation) or electronic, I suggest listening very = careful=3D ly to what is available. I just installed a new Makin 3-manual here in = north=3D ern California and it is so pipe-like it is scary. Everyone that has heard = i=3D t so far has said &quot;it sounds just like a pipe organ.&quot; I do not = kno=3D w where you are located, but if you are anywhere close to the west coast = it =3D would be worth a visit to hear and play this organ as part of your = decision =3D making process.<BR> <BR> If one has a fine pipe organ and can solve placement problems so that the = o=3D rgan meets the musical and sound needs of the church, then retaining it is = l=3D ikely the best bet, unless funds prohibit this. But, once you've heard a = Mak=3D in you will know that there is a musically solid and pipe-like alternative = t=3D hat is head and shoulders above the rest.<BR> <BR> Best regards,<BR> Jason McGuire<BR> <BR> </TT></BLOCKQUOTE> </BODY> </HTML>   --MS_Mac_OE_3023251445_59781_MIME_Part--    
(back) Subject: Re: Pipes v electric. From: bud <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 20 Oct 1999 08:12:35 -0700   Paul - I take it you have a central tower over the crossing?   You might consider this: it doesn't take many ranks of properly-voiced pipes in an antiphonal organ to lead the congregation. For the cost of an electronic, you could probably have a small antiphonal organ in the West End. If there's absolutely no room for it on the console (tabs and/or combination action), it CAN be done with toggle switches, and/or by adding a "floating" division of tabs with a "Swell/Great/Both" toggle switch.   Something like:   ANTIPHONAL   Manual   8' Open Diapason (most places need the weight of an 8' Diapason, particularly if the room isn't live) 8' Bourdon 4' Octave 2' Fifteenth   Pedal   16' Bourdon - 1-12 wood, rest borrowed from 8'   If you have more money to play with, you might put some of the colour stops that are missing from the main organ in an Antiphonal Swell ... Vox Angelica, Vox humana, a small Cornet, etc.   I've played in a couple of churches where it was absolutely necessary to have at least the antiphonal 8' Flute on ALL the time on EVERY division to give the organ any kind of presence in the room; and flute 8' / principal 4' had to be drawn whenever the congregation was singing.   Cheers,   Bud   paul austin wrote:   > Hello all. I have just had a phone call from one of our church wardens > regarding the organ in our church. We currently have a two manual pipe > organ which is in good condition, is well maintained and is operating > well. The church committees are now working on what they call 'phase > 3' and it includes the organ. They are considering removing the pipe > organ to make more space in the vestry area, and replacing it with an > electronic. My feelings on this matter are mixed. One of the problems > we have always had is getting the sound around the church. The organ > is currently situated in the Chancel, and most of the sound we loose > up the tower before it reaches the congregation. The result is that > the organ and choir are at one speed, and the congregation at > another. One suggestion is that the speakers of an electronic could > be spread around the building to even out the sound. This is only one > problem of many. Anyway, I am going to be invited to a meeting with > church officials to put my views forward. I would be grateful for any > advice on this topic such as reasons for keeping our pipe organ as it > is, bearing in mind it is in very good order and was fully restored > only 10 years ago, but remembering our problem with sound, and any > advice on possible replacements and where we should be looking for a > good electronic, if one exists! I hope I have put this across > clearly. If I have not let me know. I look forward to hearing from > you. Paul Austin paul.p.austin@talk21.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Welte Philharmonic Player Pipe Organ From: bud <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 20 Oct 1999 08:15:37 -0700   Check out the OHS archives of "The Tracker" ... the Denver convention = included a couple of Welte organs, and gave a history of the company.   Cheers,   Bud   TheOrganst@aol.com wrote:   > I've just acquired my 11th organ for my house. YIKES! Does anyone on = this > list know anything about the Welte? Books? Diagrams? Etc.? It's 9 ranks, = a > beautiful carved and hand painted Mahogany console, with Deagon Harp and > chimes. The pipe work is beautiful. The 3 reed stops are from Gottfried, > Erie, PA. Any help would be appreciated. > > Thanks. > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Pipes v electric. From: Blaine Ricketts <blaineri@home.com> Date: Wed, 20 Oct 1999 08:31:35 -0700   <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> <body bgcolor=3D"#FFFFFF"> What makes the font size so small on only a very few postings? <p>Blaine Ricketts <p>paul austin wrote: <blockquote TYPE=3DCITE><style></style> <font face=3D"Arial"><font size=3D-1>Hello all.</font></font>&nbsp;<font face=3D"Arial"><font size=3D-1>I have just = had a phone call from one of our church wardens regarding the organ in our church.</font></font></blockquote>   </body> </html>    
(back) Subject: Transcription Performers From: Jack Williams <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 20 Oct 1999 09:35:52 -0700 (PDT)   Dear List,   Let's open this new thread of discussion: Who do you think are the great transcription performers and why.     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Bid and sell for free at http://auctions.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #1121 - 10/20/99 From: richard r stein grumpy <grumpy@gwis.com> Date: Wed, 20 Oct 1999 13:21:54 -0400     --------------3C6A32C46158224DDDF8899C Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   THIS POST IS DIRECTED TO THOSE ON THE LIST WHO GET INVOLVED WITH MODIFYING AND EXPANDING EXISTING PIPE ORGAN INSTALLATIONS.   I HAVE AVAILABLE TWO PIPE-ORGAN KEYBOARDS IN LIKE-NEW CONDITION.. = RICHARD S. GRUMPY@GWIS.COM   --------------3C6A32C46158224DDDF8899C Content-Type: text/html; charset=3Dus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML> <FONT SIZE=3D+1>THIS POST IS DIRECTED TO THOSE ON THE LIST WHO GET</FONT> <BR><FONT SIZE=3D+1>INVOLVED WITH MODIFYING AND EXPANDING EXISTING</FONT> <BR><FONT SIZE=3D+1>PIPE ORGAN INSTALLATIONS.</FONT><FONT = SIZE=3D+1></FONT>   <P><FONT SIZE=3D+1>I HAVE AVAILABLE TWO PIPE-ORGAN KEYBOARDS IN LIKE-NEW CONDITION..&nbsp;&nbsp; RICHARD = S.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; GRUMPY@GWIS.COM</FONT></HTML>   --------------3C6A32C46158224DDDF8899C--    
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #1121 - 10/20/99 From: Bob Loesch <rrloesch@jps.net> Date: Wed, 20 Oct 1999 13:11:37 -0700   At 01:21 PM 10/20/1999 -0400, you wrote: > THIS POST IS DIRECTED TO THOSE ON THE LIST WHO GET >INVOLVED WITH MODIFYING AND EXPANDING EXISTING >PIPE ORGAN INSTALLATIONS. GRUMPY@GWIS.COM     Where are they, and how much do you want for them?     Regards,   Bob   http://www.jps.net/rrloesch   Time flies whether you're having fun or not!   The best things in life aren't THINGS.  
(back) Subject: Re: Transcription Performers From: Robert Horton <GEMSHORN@UKANS.EDU> Date: Wed, 20 Oct 1999 16:01:29 -0600   >Let's open this new thread of discussion: Who do you >think are the great transcription performers and why.   Wonderful! There's nothing I enjoy more than a good transcription, and the more stop-changes the merrier! No discussion of transcriptions would be complete without first mentioning the venerable Sebastian Bach. While we still have extant = copies of his transcriptions of Italian (and/or wannabe-Italian) concerti, the importance goes far beyond those works. Contemporary accounts inform us that, in addition to making some money of of their sale, Bach used these transcriptions as a way to "jump-start" his own creativity. When Bach sat down at a keyboard to improvise, he would start by playing through someone else's work (possibly a concerto transcription) and this would then give his own creative genius a "roll-start" and he would then proceed to improvise all manner of various and sundry fantasies. The other figure that MUST be mentioned is Edwin Henry Lemare. More than anyone else, Lemare has shaped the modern genre of orchestral transcription...so much so that his published transcriptions still overshadow his original works (which are quite inspiring and enjoyable in their own right). Other names such as W.T.Best and R. Goss-Custard certainly come to mind, but Lemare is the one that simply stands head-and-shoulders above the rest. Lemare was a gifted improvisor, and his playing at St. Margaret's was quite famous while he was organist. The rector of St. Margaret's is said to have asked Lemare to "...improvise for fifteen minutes or so in order to inspire him with a sermon." Imagine that in today's church! Unfortunately, as the all-to-familiar story goes, there was a change in = the church management and the new rector didn't care for Lemare's playing. = The organist's role was diminished and the choir of men and boys at St. Margaret's was essentially dismantled. Lemare had to resign, and left two years later to make his career as a concert organist in America (Britain's loss is indeed our gain! ;-) Lemare performed hundreds of concerts, for audiences of thousands. He was legendary for his exquisite use of colors and virtuosic registration. His transcriptions and original works are published in (ten?) volumes by Wayne Leupold and are extremely challenging, but highly appealing works. During a performance in San Francisco, he played a transcription of the "Stars and Stripes Forever"...playing the piccolo obbligato on a pedal 1' flute to the amazement of everyone in the room. I often wonder why more people don't perform his works (both original and otherwise)--his writing is quite ideally suited to the characteristically dead rooms that one finds here in North America. Alas, most folks over here seem queerly interested in all those European folks that were writing for large reverberant rooms over on the continent.   Rob     Robert Horton - GTA, University of Kansas http://falcon.cc.ukans.edu/~gemshorn/   "...an A&E mind in an MTV world."      
(back) Subject: Re: Transcription Performers From: Jack Williams <jackwilliams_1999@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 20 Oct 1999 14:28:47 -0700 (PDT)   Very good historical perspective, Robert. Though, I have heard performances of Lemare's transcriptions of some of the Wagner overtures. Who do you all think are some of the great transcription performers of our time?   --- Robert Horton <GEMSHORN@UKANS.EDU> wrote: > >Let's open this new thread of discussion: Who do > you > >think are the great transcription performers and > why. > > Wonderful! There's nothing I enjoy more than a > good transcription, > and the more stop-changes the merrier! > No discussion of transcriptions would be complete > without first > mentioning the venerable Sebastian Bach. While we > still have extant copies > of his transcriptions of Italian (and/or > wannabe-Italian) concerti, the > importance goes far beyond those works. > Contemporary accounts inform us > that, in addition to making some money of of their > sale, Bach used these > transcriptions as a way to "jump-start" his own > creativity. When Bach sat > down at a keyboard to improvise, he would start by > playing through someone > else's work (possibly a concerto transcription) and > this would then give > his own creative genius a "roll-start" and he would > then proceed to > improvise all manner of various and sundry > fantasies. > The other figure that MUST be mentioned is Edwin > Henry Lemare. > More than anyone else, Lemare has shaped the modern > genre of orchestral > transcription...so much so that his published > transcriptions still > overshadow his original works (which are quite > inspiring and enjoyable in > their own right). Other names such as W.T.Best and > R. Goss-Custard > certainly come to mind, but Lemare is the one that > simply stands > head-and-shoulders above the rest. > Lemare was a gifted improvisor, and his playing at > St. Margaret's > was quite famous while he was organist. The rector > of St. Margaret's is > said to have asked Lemare to "...improvise for > fifteen minutes or so in > order to inspire him with a sermon." Imagine that > in today's church! > Unfortunately, as the all-to-familiar story goes, > there was a change in the > church management and the new rector didn't care for > Lemare's playing. The > organist's role was diminished and the choir of men > and boys at St. > Margaret's was essentially dismantled. Lemare had > to resign, and left two > years later to make his career as a concert organist > in America (Britain's > loss is indeed our gain! ;-) > Lemare performed hundreds of concerts, for > audiences of thousands. > He was legendary for his exquisite use of colors and > virtuosic > registration. His transcriptions and original works > are published in > (ten?) volumes by Wayne Leupold and are extremely > challenging, but highly > appealing works. During a performance in San > Francisco, he played a > transcription of the "Stars and Stripes > Forever"...playing the piccolo > obbligato on a pedal 1' flute to the amazement of > everyone in the room. > I often wonder why more people don't perform his > works (both > original and otherwise)--his writing is quite > ideally suited to the > characteristically dead rooms that one finds here in > North America. Alas, > most folks over here seem queerly interested in all > those European folks > that were writing for large reverberant rooms over > on the continent. > > Rob > > > Robert Horton - GTA, University of Kansas > http://falcon.cc.ukans.edu/~gemshorn/ > > "...an A&E mind in an MTV world." > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital > organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Bid and sell for free at http://auctions.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Transcription Performers From: Robert Horton <GEMSHORN@UKANS.EDU> Date: Wed, 20 Oct 1999 20:45:54 -0600   >Very good historical perspective, Robert. Though, I >have heard performances of Lemare's transcriptions of >some of the Wagner overtures. I hope you have the opportunity to hear more than his Wagner...particularly the work he did with the lighter fare from Italian opera, and even his work with Tchaikovsky.   >Who do you all think >are some of the great transcription performers of our >time? Tough to say...the art of the transcription came under heavy fire during the American organ reform movement and has yet to recover. As it stands nowadays, organists are still living under a self-imposed = moratorium on transcribing--students just aren't encouraged to try it out, and are often even actively *discouraged*...Further, modern technique has really slumped in regards to registration--Few folks nowadays have the ears, the sense of color, or the registrational technique necessary to pull off a transcription. Nonetheless, things are starting to change bit by bit. Two artists I would start with are Thomas Trotter over in Birmingham, and Thomas = Murray at Yale University. Both have the chops, the color sensibilities, and the instruments (Woolsey, and Birmingham) needed to pull off a good orchestral rendition. Finally, the current generation of young organists (myself included) seems more interested in transcribing--as evidenced by many concert programmes publishes in TAO. Give it another decade or so, and I think we'll see some real hummers!   Robert Horton - GTA, University of Kansas http://falcon.cc.ukans.edu/~gemshorn/   "...an A&E mind in an MTV world."      
(back) Subject: Organ Transcriptions From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Wed, 20 Oct 1999 21:03:52 -0500   Theatre organ is a natural for transcriptions. With its' orchestral possibilities, and in the right hands -Reginald Foort and Jesse Crawford = to name a few. Several other TO'ists have transcribed pieces to theatrical success. Rapid stop changes and orchestral tone coloring bring the symphony to the console.   Rick dutchorgan+AEA-svs.net