PipeChat Digest #1063 - Monday, September 6, 1999
 
Re: Lots of verses
  by "Barbara Eppley" <beppley@acorn.net>
Re: Lots of verses
  by "Stanley E Yoder" <syoder+@andrew.cmu.edu>
Re: a-mens on hymns
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: a-mens on hymns and unversed Catholics
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: a-mens on hymns
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: a-mens on hymns
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: Lots of verses (longish)
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Lots of verses
  by "Becky Ingram" <rringram@mailbox.syr.edu>
Divided Chancels (longish)
  by "Erik Johnson" <the_maitre@hotmail.com>
Unequal Magnificat!!!   X-post
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: Music List: First UMC Toms River
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: divided chancel controversy
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net>
Verse Registration Alternation
  by "Erik Johnson" <the_maitre@hotmail.com>
Re: Canadian Roman Catholic music directors.....
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: OHS convention in Montreal
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: Lots of verses (longish)
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: Lots of verses
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: Music List: First UMC Toms River
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: Lots of verses
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Unequal Mag.. (oops)
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Re: Verse Registration Alternation
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Lots of verses From: Barbara Eppley <beppley@acorn.net> Date: Mon, 6 Sep 99 9:14:21 EDT   Hi - My name is Barb and I play for a smallish Disciples congregation in Ohio. Our organ is approx 8 - 10 ranks with unification to pedal, and a truly obnoxious trumpet (but in combo with other stops it gets the job done)   My question to list memebers is:   When we play 8 verses of something, what do we do to vary them? I suspect we all have "routines" we go through from verse to verse and i would love to hear them. thanks......bke   xx -- The Eppley Family beppley@acorn.net lilkate06@aol.com blondi4692@aol.com Yrexlncy@aol.com Happy Comminicating!                                       q   x                                 The Eppley's: beppley@acorn.net,lilkate06@aol.com,blondi4692@aol.com,Yrexlncy@aol.com, smtp:eppleyg@bemis.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Lots of verses From: Stanley E Yoder <syoder+@andrew.cmu.edu> Date: Mon, 6 Sep 1999 09:58:18 -0400 (EDT)   Excerpts from mail: 6-Sep-99 Re: Lots of verses by Barbara = Eppley@acorn.net > When we play 8 verses of something, what do we do to vary them? > I suspect we all have "routines" we go through from verse to verse > and i would love to hear them.   Well, beyond free accomps and reharmonizing, there is always 1) senza pedal; 2) 'tuba in the tenor', i.e., the tune on a strong(er) stop/combination in the tenor range (or - the lazy way - using a 16' reed in the treble); and 3) no accomp at all. Stan Yoder Pittsburgh  
(back) Subject: Re: a-mens on hymns From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 6 Sep 1999 10:03:01 -0400 (EDT)   >---Bud, I would dearly love to read some > quotes from them. Could you dig up some > interesting passages for our delectation > sometime? I second the motion. This would be really interesting and fun stuff. I'll be the divided chancel stuff got really juicy!   >---I just started a new church last Sunday, and > I notice in talking to people after church in a > reception area ... one young couple I went up > and introduced myself to didn't even know I > was the organist. But old people remember > the glory of the organ from decades ago. > They would say things like, I haven't heard > the organ sound like that since... First Methodist is primarily an older parish, and I've had the same experience. It is so rewarding to be in a place where I don't feel like an appliance to be turned on and off at will and ingnored when not in use. It is also very important to use all of the organ EACH week. I try to use each stop at least once (except for mixtures which are reserved for late Saturday afternoon when all of the buildings are empty!) The congregation loves hearing the various voices in solo, yes, even the choimes!   >When that generation passes away, where will > we be? Don't know how old you are, Randy, but I hope I'm playing a three-manual tracker harp with unequal temperament! Playing (or doing anything) for indifferent and ungrateful people is just not my cup-o-tea!   Bruce & the Baskerbeagles ~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~   When a man's dog turns against him it is time for his wife to pack her trunk and go home to mama. -- Mark Twain    
(back) Subject: Re: a-mens on hymns and unversed Catholics From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 6 Sep 1999 10:15:30 -0400 (EDT)     >We sing "Remember All the People," no. 495 > in the 1955 _Hymnbook_ (Presbyterian > Church U.S.A.)--still used as an alternate > hymnal in my church--catholic-style, as the > closing hymn.... Ah! One of my favorite hymnals. Albert J. Kissling, editor, was pastor at Riverside Pres - Jax FL when I attended there with my father years (!!) ago. What a fantastic preacher. I recall one Sunday when a slightly inebriated hobo type came in during the sermon and sat down. After a few minutes he seemed to get into what was going on an started shouting Ay-men, Ay-man after sermon statements. Dr. Kissing looked down on him from the high pulpit and with a great big smile said, "I'm sorry sir, but this is a Presbyterian church and we don't allow emotion in worship." The whole place collapsed in laughter and I'm not sure if the hobo understood, but he really enjoyed being singled out and acknowledged for his contribution. Dr. Kissling could heal any hurt with that wonderful smile. They just don't make 'em like that any more!   >"Where children wade through rice fields / And > watch the camel trains. " We always sang this, "where children wade through rice fields to watch the camels train."   >"Some work in sultry forests / Where apes > swing to and fro...."   We didn't use this hymn much in worship, but it was always a hit a choir parties for charades!     Bruce & the Baskerbeagles ~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~   When a man's dog turns against him it is time for his wife to pack her trunk and go home to mama. -- Mark Twain    
(back) Subject: Re: a-mens on hymns From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 6 Sep 1999 10:27:03 -0400 (EDT)     >d) Anglican chant, >e) Plain chant, >Ack, I've been trying to get that in MY church! > But that means I have to transcribe Hildegard > von Bingen. It's really easy. The chants are used as either anthems or parts of preludes and are written out in the Methodist hymnal style with the wonderful assistance of Sibelius Softward (plug, plug -- send check to.... ;-) ). The choir loves it because they can learn beautiful harmony quickly, and the plainchant is hauntingly beautiful and unison unless there is a bass drone, or tenor/bass fifth drone. I've found that using choir as part of my prelude causes the congregation to think the service has already started and they stop talking. I use a chanted verse of psalm, then play an improvisation based on the next verse, and continue the alternation. If you do not improvise there is a wonderful book by Carl Nielsen called 29 Improvisations (i think) which has very short -- some 16 measures!) which can be used at the organ verses (none have titles). Also, two or three of these improvisations can be "pasted" together to form a mini-suite. They are absolutely wonderful and I highly recommend them to anyone who wants improvisation material to study. (Frantic Brenda will know were to get 'em!!)   >A Catholic, a Methodist and an Anglican go to > hell. So the Methodist says to the Catholic > "What are you here for?" The Catholic says "I > forget to say a Hail Mary. What are you in > for?" The Methodist says "I drank real wine > during communion." So they turn to the > Anglican and ask "What are you in for?" The > Anglican says "I used the salad fork for my > dessert." hehehehe I've heard it said that Anglicans don't have sins..... just lapses in good taste! ;-)   >n) lots-o-coffee >Coffee is a DAMN good thing. Methodist Holy Water!!! ;-)   >It is not traditional to sing amen after a gospel > hymn... it was more commonly spoken (or > shouted) ;-) >Praise th' LO' mah bruthah! AYMEN.... and pass the biscuits!!! ;-)   Bruce & the Baskerbeagles ~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~   When a man's dog turns against him it is time for his wife to pack her trunk and go home to mama. -- Mark Twain    
(back) Subject: Re: a-mens on hymns From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 6 Sep 1999 10:32:56 -0400 (EDT)   >I played ten Sundays in a Methodist church > this summer, and enjoyed the good sermons, > the spirited singing, the friendliness, and their > appreciation of my playing. It just doesn't get any better.... unless the organ is tracker and unequal temperament!! ;-)   >Twice they applauded the prelude. That I can live without. We did a very contempory anthem in jazz style (that I wrote.. blush blush) and I was so afraid they were going to applaud, but bless their hearts, they were quiet as mice when it was over and even allowed the sound to reverberate through the building. They were complimentary on the front steps, which was nice!   >Looks like you don't need my sympathy for > having to play the amens, though. Nah! I can even lead into the Amen with a deceptive cadence and I can almost hear the congregation taking an even larger collective breath. luv it luv it luv it!!!     Bruce & the Baskerbeagles ~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~   When a man's dog turns against him it is time for his wife to pack her trunk and go home to mama. -- Mark Twain    
(back) Subject: Re: Lots of verses (longish) From: "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 06 Sep 1999 10:49:23 -0400   Now, Neil, let me ask: During the modulation, it is subtle and sneaky, = and no one with an ordinary ear can "tell" that a modulation has really occurred--but psychologically, the EFFECT of the modulation (exhilaration) is still there. In short, we're singing at a higher pitch, but don't intellectually know it--but the subliminal (literally) effect is still there. Is this correct?   Alan   ---------- >From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown)   > Very often what I will do, is > lower the hymn so that when we get to final stanza, I can then play it > in the key as written in hymnal.  
(back) Subject: Re: Lots of verses From: Becky Ingram <rringram@mailbox.syr.edu> Date: Mon, 6 Sep 1999 10:51:17 -0400 (EDT)   > When we play 8 verses of something, what do we do to vary them? > I suspect we all have "routines" we go through from verse to verse > and i would love to hear them.   One of the things that I like to do is to exclude the pedal on one verse, or use a pedal tone. For instance, say in "Ye Watchers and Ye Holy Ones", often times somewhere around verse 4, I skip out on the pedal. Registration wise, I use gemshorn, gadekt, and light 4' stops. This gives the verse a very light sound. Adding a light 2' cleans up the sound a little. In addition, on the last verse, it is my trademark to hold the A (assuming it's in D), or in any case, a pedal tone on V, then play what is written on the manuals. I find that this is a really majestic sound.   Another thing to do is to just register according to the verses. Reeds for verses with the words "fire," "majestic," etc. Flutes or mutations for "wwater," "river," etc.   -Rebekah    
(back) Subject: Divided Chancels (longish) From: "Erik Johnson" <the_maitre@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 06 Sep 1999 10:52:43 EDT   I have the same situation here at N.D. that Scott has at the Shrine with some noteable exceptions: No front pipe organ (electronic instead), rear balcony seats over 60 and is more of a huge platform loft about 30 from = the floor and great for singing, divided chancel in front seats 50 (25 per side)- also in a very live acoustic.   I hav the choir upstairs most of the time - singing resounds VERY well = from this position and the organ can be reduced to a mere wisper when needed. The choir sung from the front on Good Friday and part of the Midnight Mass =   (with procession in). We would like to be down front on more occasions = but alas - havent for 30 years and the cassoks and surplices have long since rotted. We are in the process of raising funds to buy new ones. So, until =   then we will continue to be in the back for the majority of the time.   I do dissagree with the "potificating" comment though. Choirs ( &organs) have been placed up high for acoustical reasons - sound simply projects better. Scotts situation may be hindered by all the cork and the choir sitting in between the organ cases - when I encountered situations like = this I had the choir get out from between the cases and as close to the balcony =   railing as possible! I also say how dare a R.C. Preist talk about "pontificating" when the majority of them sit on what has become to look like a Throne Room glorifing thier already huge egos! Directly against Vatican II - the Preist's chair has now become the highest and most prominent focal point of most churches! (Dead center and usually up 5-10 stairs - oh god forbid if we have to go back to kneeling in front of them and kissing thier rings!) I would warn, however about the music ministries "up front" with one comment, Remember our purpose in the Mass. Music up front can, not = always, but can become a spectcle or show. We must be very aware of this and catuion our selves not to get out of control. Directors may consider = using more restrained arm motions or simple nods for cues rather than broad sweeping arms lookingmuch like Segi Ozawa from the B.S.O. Decorum is ALWAYS part of our job, we are note supposed to STEAL the show, we are = there to be part of and enhance the MASS.   All the Best, The _Maitre   ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Unequal Magnificat!!! X-post From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 6 Sep 1999 10:54:24 -0400 (EDT)   I must share today's experience. An absolutely glorious Saturday morning. The sun is shining brightly outside and the air-conditioning is cooling mightily inside. The dogs are snoring. (but I digress...)   I am listening to a new CD picked-up in Montreal. It is called Magnificat and is on the ATMA label. Yves Prefontaine, who played magnificently for us at the Grande Seminaire de Montreal during the OHS convention, has recorded a similar program on the stunning Guilbault-Therien organ in the chapel. The program is: 1) Le Livre de Montreal - Suite in F 2) Nicholas Geoffroy -- Magnificat du 1er ton with sung chants by Jean-Pierre Couturier 3) Pierre Attaingnant - Quatre versets du 8e ton 4) Jean Francois Dandrieu - Mag en sol mineur 5) Jehan Titelouze - Mag at sexti toni with sung chants by J-P C 6) Louis Nicholar Clerambault - Suite du 1er ton The organ: Guilbault-Therien (1991) gorgeous case and mechanical action Grand orgue: 16 Montre, Bourdon 8 Montre, Bourdon 4 Prestant, Flute 3-1/5 Gross Tierce 2-2/3 Nazard 2 Doublette, Quarte 1-3/5 Tierce Cornet V Fourniture V Cymbale IV 8 1ere trompette, 2e trompette 4 Clairon 8 Voix humaine   Positif: 8 Montre, Bourdon 4 Prestant, Flute 2-2/3 Nazard 2 Doublette 1-3/5 Tierce 1-1/3 Larigot Fourniture IV Cymbale III 8 Trompette, Cromornre   Recit: Cornet V Hautbois 8   Pedale Flute 16 8 4 Bombarde 16 8 4   Deux rossignols (Romeo & Juliette!!) Tremblant fort et tremblant doux Positif au GO Grand orgue a la pedale   It is tuned at A-415 with unequal temperament in the manner of Rameau.   Although I primarily attend OHS to heard old and small organs, the program at the Grand Seminaire was the highligt of my week and provided a much-desired worship experience, this being the "lie there and be lifted" type. My only regret is that I didn't get to pump this instrument while it was being played. The reeds on this instrument are absolutely exquisite, possessing all of the fire expected from descriptions of French reeds and with body seldom found in USA examples. This organ builder really knows what he (they) is (are) doing.   Bruce & the Baskerbeagles ~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~   When a man's dog turns against him it is time for his wife to pack her trunk and go home to mama. -- Mark Twain    
(back) Subject: Re: Music List: First UMC Toms River From: "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 06 Sep 1999 10:55:18 -0400   Isn't it amazing? Poor Joe Barnby wrote so many things, 99% so thoroughly forgettable--and then comes along this one, really eminently fine.   Alan   >From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net (N Brown)   > When Morning Gilds..), I did an extended intro   > fortunately it worked > nicely, so I repeated at the 11:00 service. This is one of my favorite > hymns, so I always do it up big when we sing it.  
(back) Subject: Re: divided chancel controversy From: "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 06 Sep 1999 11:08:09 -0400   Bud:   I'd thought it must have been earlier than "between the wars," and am glad to have your clarification, which, upon reflection, makes sense. But let = me ask then (with the excuse that it's a well-enough known church): Trinity Wall Street. Was it built originally with a shallow non-divided choir in the 1840s? I've been pointing it out as an example of how FAST Tractarianism crossed the pond--but I'll bet I was wrong.   I'm working on "when" a Lutheran church was first built in America with divided choir. Just post-WWII, I can cite; but earlier?   Interesting Tractarian migration EASTward: Divided choir at Uppsala Cathedral, Sweden. Looks original, but I'll bet it's from the 1920s when Canterbury and Uppsala were sleeping together.   Alan   ---------- >From: Bud/Burgie <budchris@earthlink.net>   > When the Oxford Movement really hit its stride in the Episcopal church = in this > country between the wars, many Episcopal churches ripped up their = chancels (usually > barely big enough for a modest communion table), and in many cases tried = to > shoehorn divided choir-stalls, an altar and the organ into space that = God never > intended to hold divided choir-stalls, an altar, and the organ. > > Organs were sawn in two and electrocuted so they could be placed on = either side of > the newly divided chancels. Many were discarded, ruined, shoehorned into chambers, > etc. It was NOT a happy time for beautiful old tracker organs. >  
(back) Subject: Verse Registration Alternation From: "Erik Johnson" <the_maitre@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 06 Sep 1999 11:09:37 EDT   Now that was an interseting Title! When playing any hymn, I always change registration (could be my = expierince from playing in sooooo many Protestant Churches!) ;-)   At any rate, here is my standard formula for normal hymns, ie: Hyfrydol, Lobe den Herren, Nun Dankett alle Gott, etc. etc.... Intro: Maunals: Principals 8,4,2 w/ light reed (Hautbois) - pedal to = match. Verse 1: Same except - reed off, Recit Mixture on - possibly 8 flute on manuals for depth. Verse 2: Mixture and 2' off - 4'flutes on - reduce pedal Verse 3: All 4's off - 2'on - Sw to Gt 4' coupler on - (this gives that = very bright and open sound that many have heard on English Choir Hymn Recordings.) Adjust 8's as needed - may be off Principal on Flutes - up to =   you! Verse 4: Manuals 8,4,2,Mixture and Light to Medium Reed (Hautbois or = Smaller Trompette) with light 16' (Bourdon) - pedal heavier with big 16' flues and =   possible 32' if available.   There are alternations to this: Verse 2-3 may use the Tuba for the melody in the tenor range, may use Trompette Chorus Fanfares between phrases (National Hymn, Crown Him With many Crowns), reducing the organ to nothing for certain parts of a stanza (the Alleliuas on All Creatures of our God and King - lets the = congregation really come out and hear themselves!), last note or phrase can also have = the 32 Bombarde if not too bright and loud.   My suggestion for anyone wanting to learn about Hymn Registration and Alternation is to listen to many GOOD recordings of Hymns that are out = there from Cathedrals or English Churches, "Your Favourite Hymns, Hymns From St. =   Paul's London, Be Still My Soul - Hymn Collection" All of these will give insights on the art of registration for those who do not want to play 5 verses on (Yawn) the same ol' thing!   All the Best,   The Maitre   ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Canadian Roman Catholic music directors..... From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 6 Sep 1999 11:20:40 -0400 (EDT)   >It is interesting that you should raise the > question of hymn playing at the Montreal > convention, which I was unfortunately unable > to attend due to pressure of work this year. > One friend of mine who was present, > however, reported that he thought the organ > recitals were of a very high standard, except > that the standard of hymn accompaniment at > them was, with some exceptions, extremely > poor. This is true, unfortunately. I say this in a totally constructive way.... There seemed to be a tendency on the part of some hymn players who are usually recitalists at OHS conventions (and seemed somewhat slighted by not being asked this year!) to prove to the recitalists that they were just as good if not better. Several hymnplayers actually attempted to improvise grandiose introductions and accompaniments are wound up butchering both. There were in very sharp contrast to a couple of players who humbly sat at the console and just played the hell out of the hymn with wonderful introductions. Mark Brombaugh, Bruce Stevens and Judy Olikkala to name three; there were a couple of others, but not many. Ego sure got in the way this time.   I think it is very important for musicians to learn the techniques necessary for the various uses of their instrument and it's various locations. Hymn playing and choral accompanying is one of the biggies.   Bruce & the Baskerbeagles ~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~   When a man's dog turns against him it is time for his wife to pack her trunk and go home to mama. -- Mark Twain    
(back) Subject: Re: OHS convention in Montreal From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 6 Sep 1999 11:26:59 -0400 (EDT)     > Last year, with permission, I cross-posted > them to both lists, but having been really > offended by a sudden rash of ill-informed and > open hostility toward PipOrg-L expressed on > this list, I have posted only there.   Oh, hehehehe! Good shot, Malcolm! You're the greatest!!! ;-)   Bruce & the Baskerbeagles ~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~   When a man's dog turns against him it is time for his wife to pack her trunk and go home to mama. -- Mark Twain    
(back) Subject: Re: Lots of verses (longish) From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 6 Sep 1999 11:33:00 -0400 (EDT)       >=A0=A0I will however reveal to you all one of the > formulas I use, especially if the hymn is a > sturdy and robust one. =A0 Anything over 4 > stanzas, in my mind, demands a modulation, > usually. Very often what I will do, is lower the > hymn so that when we get to final stanza, I > can then play it in the key as written in > hymnal. Another interesting way to spice up a hymn is to lower a stanza about a fourth to put it smack in the range of the basses. The congregation easily picks up on this and doesn't need to be warned. I've discovered that when a congregation is given advance notice of something "special" the tendence it to stop and listen rather than sing.   Also, lowering the final stanza of a hymn will give added oomph by placing it in a more comfortable range and getting a more robust, although sometimes darker sound from the congregation. And, just to ward off the nay-sayers, a lower key does not always lead to depression!   Bruce & the Baskerbeagles ~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~   When a man's dog turns against him it is time for his wife to pack her trunk and go home to mama. -- Mark Twain    
(back) Subject: Re: Lots of verses From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 6 Sep 1999 11:40:55 -0400 (EDT)     >Hi - My name is Barb and I play for a smallish > Disciples congregation in Ohio. HI BARB!!   >=A0 Our organ is approx 8 - 10 ranks with > unification to pedal, and a truly obnoxious > trumpet (but in combo with other stops it gets > the job done) On a small organ, varying the registration is relatively easy. For instance if you are playing on: Diapason 8 Melodia 8 Octave 4 Fifteenth 2 simply omit the Diapason 8 on a stanza; them omit the Octave 4 on the stanza, then bring back the Diapason 8, then the Octave. Very often on a small organ, moving to the seconary manual doesn't work because the secondary manual is rather soft. Another interesting variant is to omit the 8' altogether and play only on the manual; it's quite different so you may want to bring an 8 back on half way through the hymn. Leaving off the pedal is also an easy option. By the way, while the 8' stops are off you can also retire the 16 in the pedal and drop down an octave on the manual for a slightly lighter sound of 8 4 (and don't go cheat and use the sub or super couplers and unison off -- it's wasted effort and not nearly as much fun).   One of the very fun things to do when practicing is to explore the unusual stop variations on your organ. Be creative and outragious! 'Tis fun!! ;-)   Bruce & the Baskerbeagles ~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~   When a man's dog turns against him it is time for his wife to pack her trunk and go home to mama. -- Mark Twain    
(back) Subject: Re: Music List: First UMC Toms River From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Mon, 06 Sep 1999 10:34:46 -0500   Alan Freed wrote: > > Isn't it amazing? Poor Joe Barnby wrote so many things, 99% so = thoroughly > forgettable--and then comes along this one, really eminently fine.   I have a story about Barnby. When they took the organ at St. Paul's Cathedral in London off the screen and buried it in the chancel the organist, Sir John Goss lamented "My poor organ is done for!" His friend Sir Joseph Barnby commented: "They might just as well take a grand piano and stick it up the chimney!" "When morning gilds the skies" is also one of my favorite hymns, and I also enjoy singing some of Barnby's Anglican chants that we sometimes use at our church.   John Speller, St. Louis, Mo.  
(back) Subject: Re: Lots of verses From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 6 Sep 1999 11:44:12 -0400 (EDT)     >One of the things that I like to do is to exclude > the pedal on one verse, or use a pedal tone. > For instance, say in "Ye Watchers and Ye > Holy Ones", often times somewhere around > verse 4, I skip out on the pedal. Good idea! And also the converse is true! Just plant your feet on the tonic and have a drone pedal during part of the hymn. It really brings out the melody and causes people to become rivited to the accompaniment.   Bruce & the Baskerbeagles ~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~   When a man's dog turns against him it is time for his wife to pack her trunk and go home to mama. -- Mark Twain    
(back) Subject: Unequal Mag.. (oops) From: rohrschok8@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 6 Sep 1999 11:51:06 -0400 (EDT)     >I must share today's experience. An absolutely > glorious Saturday morning. =A0 hehehehehe Duncan just informed me it is now Monday (and time for LUNCH). Thank heaven for well-trained dogs!   Bruce & the Baskerbeagles ~~+~~+~~ rohrschok8@webtv.net ~~+~~+~~   When a man's dog turns against him it is time for his wife to pack her trunk and go home to mama. -- Mark Twain    
(back) Subject: Re: Verse Registration Alternation From: DRAWKNOB@aol.com Date: Mon, 6 Sep 1999 12:18:46 EDT   In a message dated 9/6/99 10:13:07 AM Central Daylight Time, the_maitre@hotmail.com writes:   << At any rate, here is my standard formula for normal hymns >>   My interpretation of hymns leaves little room for a "standard formula" of registration.   Depending on the text of each individual verse, the liturgical season, and =   the overall mood of the service I find it detrimental to stick to a = "standard formula". Especially because each hymn and subsequently each verse = conveys it's own meaning. I use my knowledge of registration and artistic license = to determine registrations. However, I will admit that on Trinitarian or Doxological verses (usually the final stanza) I will use full principal chorus + mixtures and often times throw in a 16" reed in the pedal on the final chord for that grand ending.   John