PipeChat Digest #1069 - Wednesday, September 8, 1999
 
Re: Anglican hymnals in use in England (X-posted)
  by "Mark Harris" <M.Harris@Admin.lon.ac.uk>
Re: Anglican hymnals in use in England (X-posted)
  by "Richard Scott-Copeland" <organist@gemshorn.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: amens and grape juice
  by "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net>
priestly egos
  by "Bud/Burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
wind pressure
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@bhsroe.k12.il.us>
Re: divided chancel controversy
  by "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: Hymn Registration Alternation
  by "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: Hymn Registration Alternation
  by "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: Hymn Registration Alternation
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Hymn Registration Alternation
  by "Edward Marsh" <edmarsh@lineone.net>
Re: wind pressure
  by "Bud/Burgie" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: "Elegy" by Thalben-Ball
  by "Tom Baldwin" <tomba@pobox.com>
Re: priestly egos
  by <JDeCaria@aol.com>
Re: "Elegy" by Thalben-Ball
  by <CHERCAPA@aol.com>
Re: priestly egos
  by <CHERCAPA@aol.com>
Re: Anglican hymnals in use in England (X-posted)
  by "Michael Davis" <MichaelDavis@wykecottage.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: amens and grape juice
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: a-mens on hymns
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: a-mens on hymns and unversed Catholics
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Anglican hymnals in use in England (X-posted) From: "Mark Harris" <M.Harris@Admin.lon.ac.uk> Date: Wed, 8 Sep 1999 10:00:31 GMT   Bud,   "Songs of Sion"? Never heard of it!   At my church we used Hymns Ancient & Motheaten (or Hymns Old & Mild, if you prefer), suplemented by the various Spring Harvest books. However, = when we got our new vicar a year ago he introduced Hymns Old & New - New Anglican Edition (pub. Kevin Mayhew). Nevertheless, we still have = recourse on occasion to the superior harmonies of A&M.   Off the top of my head, I'd say that A&MR & the New English Hymnal were in =   general use in the C of E, but I don't know beans about it.   Mark Harris =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D  
(back) Subject: Re: Anglican hymnals in use in England (X-posted) From: "Richard Scott-Copeland" <organist@gemshorn.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Wed, 8 Sep 1999 11:02:39 +0100     From the Catholic standpoint the default hymnal is usually "Hymns Old and New" - being as it is absolutely LITTERED with mistakes, both in the music and the text. The congregational edition often does not match, words-wise, with the full music edition. The print in the full music edition is absolutely appalling, there is no metrical index and none of the tunes seem to be credited with a name. It = is one of the worst hymnbooks I have ever seen   Some Catholic churches use the "Celebration Hymnal" which is almost as = bad. Both of these truly awful book seem to emanate from the same publishing house - Kevin Mayhew, which probably explains a lot! Others use the American Gather book which is ok but a bit "Happy-Clappy" = for my taste, although the music printing quality is much better, the full = music edition is so large that it falls apart and will not fit on a piano - = which is where most of the material contained within usually ends up.   It is really a rather sorry state of affairs with the Catholic church and hymnals!     Richard Scott-Copeland Staff Organist, Portsmouth Cathedral Parish organist, St Edmund's Catholic Church, Southampton. Southampton England    
(back) Subject: Re: amens and grape juice From: Paul Opel <popel@sover.net> Date: Wed, 8 Sep 1999 07:06:30 -0400   Seiously, though, with the teaspoon of fluid in those little communion cups? You can get that much alcohol in your morning orange juice- or a = dash of soy sauce.   Paul   >You know, some of us don't get along too well with wine, and it can react >disastrously with certain medicines. > Diane S. >(straight@infoblvd.net) > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org     http://www.sover.net/~popel      
(back) Subject: priestly egos From: Bud/Burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 06 Sep 1999 15:34:01 -0700   I wasn't "raised" Roman Catholic. I had my first RC job my freshman year of college. I worked in the RC church from 1962-1976 (with a couple of years off to try and make silk purses out of various sow's ears in Episcopal churches), so I know whereof I speak.   I made some GREAT friends among the RC clergy, particularly among the monks of the various abbeys I used to visit every summer, and the absolute HIGHLIGHT of my vacations used to be visiting the cloistered Carmelite nuns around and about (I first met the Carmelites when I was called to patch the bellows on a fabulous old Mason & Hamlin reed organ in the public chapel of the Carmel in Cleveland Heights).   BUT ... with a couple of notable exceptions, I found the DIOCESAN RC clergy in Cleveland, Cincinnati and San Diego to be absolute NIGHTMARES ... the priests who came through the seminary system BEFORE Vatican II were bitter authoritarians who saw their world crumbling, and were going to hang onto their authority over everything and everybody, WHATEVER the cost; the younger priests were ignorant, arrogant iconoclasts, hell-bent on demolishing ANYTHING that reminded them of the pre-Vatican II church.   Most of the Episcopal priests of my childhood and high school days were saintly scholars ... oh yes, they were very much "Cardinal Rectors" in the grand old style, but their people genuinely LOVED them, and so did I. And I did what they told me to do because THEY knew what the hell they were talking about. And it was them, rather than the priests of my later experience, who shaped my spirituality and my knowledge of liturgy.   It took a few more years for the Vatican II mentality to penetrate the Episcopal seminaries, but then they started turning out priests who were cookie-cutter replicas of the RC monsters I'd had to deal with ... they majored in Ignorance and minored in Arrogance.   Currently, I have my moments with Earnest Young Rector ... there are some BIG holes in his formal education, since the ACC hasn't had a working seminary for several years ... but he is first and foremost a man of prayer ... if he gets too frisky, I remind him of that (being some 20 years his senior), and that usually works. His vision of the Church is narrow, even by anglo-catholic standards, but he's young. I keep telling him, "Wait till you get to be MY age ...".   Sometimes I think the Holy Ghost preserves the Church IN SPITE OF the priests (AND bishops) ... Cardinal Ratzinger ... now THERE'S a REAL piece of work, and, like as not, he'll be the next POPE ... God HELP the Roman Catholics!   Cheers,   Bud   Icorgan@aol.com wrote:   > In a message dated 09/05/1999 6:50:01 PM Central Daylight Time, > rohrschok8@webtv.net writes: > > << I have been told by > priests that the entrance hymn is for the "entrance"of the priest who = is > "Lord for an hour", >> > I find a statement such as this shocking. I'm equally shocked that any = priest > or minister would utter it aloud. It seems to me that when the minister > becomes the central focus of the worship then the church should either = close > its doors or get a new minister. That includes Catholics and Baptists = and > everyone in between. > > I've said for a long time that it seemed to me that ministers were on a = giant > ego trip. (Before you get out the flame throwers, I know that doesn't = include > all of them). > Maynard > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: wind pressure From: Gary Black <gblack@bhsroe.k12.il.us> Date: Wed, 08 Sep 1999 11:33:31 -0500   Dear list, I need to know what wind pressure the Estey co. used for their early organs. I have a pipe organ built by them which is: opus no. 290 built in 1905 . I am installing this in my home and need to know what they used for wind pressure. Thanks for you help.     Regard,   Gary    
(back) Subject: Re: divided chancel controversy From: "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Tue, 7 Sep 1999 18:14:57 +0100   Dear All,   In Derby cathedral (where we have sung a few times) they have 3 sets of choir. One is up against the East wall, with no divide. Above the choir's head is a small 2 manual extension organ, OK for accomp purposes, although its Swell mixture is horrible!!!   There is a choir screen about half way down the nave and on the Altar side of this is the second set. Next to these is the console to the gallery organ, a 4 manual Compton - not bad. Thirdly there are a set of movable = ones but they mainly stay on the Congregation side of the choir screen,   Richard    
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn Registration Alternation From: "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Tue, 7 Sep 1999 18:18:09 +0100   >I have always follwed the Great Master Bach when he said, "Play the Words" - >but again we must ask ourselves how much is too much? There is a fine = line >between enhancing the text by registration and showing off virtuostic >ability for showmans sake! It is also nice - I must admit - to hear just = a >plain ol' accompianment - no frills just good solid playing / seems like >some organists can't even manage 'that'.     In one of Bach's job descriptions, he is instructed to "Accompany the Chorales [the practice was to just have a tune and make up the harmony (which he got in trouble for!)] on the diapasons, the to change the stops = on every verse"   Richard    
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn Registration Alternation From: "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Tue, 7 Sep 1999 18:21:31 +0100   <<When I was studying at Christ Church Cathedral - Houston TX, William Barnard showed me how to set the organ up from p to ff on divisional pistons 1-8, and generals 1-6 (7 and 8 were changed weekly for voluntaries) for accompanying hymns, canticles and anthems. I can still use this system and set up a large instrument in about ten minutes. He taught me to use these same setting for recital use, so that I was not at the mercy of recital by recital notes. It is very handy, in that I always know on which piston the swell reeds can be found, etc. My console is set up this way now, but in edited form since there are fewer pistons. I use them occasionally just to keep the machinery working and to keep the skill sharpened. It's almost as much fun as drawing stops manually.... but not quite. >>     On our organs the divisional pistons (1-6) are always set up in a = crescendo, the generals (also 1-6) are left up to the organist's whim for anything!!! On our smaller organs the divisional pistons (1-4, no generals) are set up the same. It is annoying when someone changes the Great & Pedals pistons = on the big organ because when you come to accompany a hymn from downstairs, = you press the West (4) button and get the ugly 16' Quint instead of the = 8'8'4'2' you anticipated!!!   Richard    
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn Registration Alternation From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Wed, 08 Sep 1999 11:03:52 -0700   At 06:21 PM 9/7/1999 +0100, you wrote:   >It is annoying when someone changes the Great & Pedals pistons on >the big organ because when you come to accompany a hymn from downstairs, >you press the West (4) button and get the ugly 16' Quint instead of the 8'8'4'2' >you anticipated!!!   One should never drive any vehicle that one has not checked out thoroughly prior to departure, and one shouldn't play ANY organ that one hasn't = checked to see what surprises have been left for him/her. Just ask Brewse = Cornely, who one day alerted the congregants a chapel with the "BOOM bada BOOM bada TIZZ TIZZ" on his Bawldwin "Fun Machine"!   hehehehehe!   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn Registration Alternation From: "Edward Marsh" <edmarsh@lineone.net> Date: Wed, 8 Sep 1999 19:17:49 +0100   Interesting ...   When the 1929 (Arthur) Harrison and Harrison (3/45) at All Saints' Church, Gosforth, UK was refurbished I had the great opportunity of having = installed a reliable and powerful solid-state piston scheme. The manuals went from fixed 3/4 pistons to 6, giving S6, G6, C6, P6 with 8 memory levels. I also had 8 generals added, 1-4 rhs swell keyslip and 5-8 rhs great keyslip and these had their own 8 level memory set. Divisional and General levels split - 2 independent rotating dials plus every inter-manual and pedal coupler on a piston. Another useful feature were the toe-piston couplers: lhs swell pedals was sw-gt and 6 pedal pistons; rhs swell pedals gt-pd, sw-pd, ch-pd and pedal reed.   The memory system proved extremely useful: Divisional Pistons Level 1 and General Pistons Level 1 acted as a (small) 'General Crescendo' great for Hymn accompaniment but I set up Levels 2 as a (large) GC fantastic for = 'big' hymns. I also set up a 'German' set and a 'French', often in a = processional or offertory hymn I would extemporise between the penultimate and last verses using one of the above registration schemes; it just provided a bit of variety!   My only regret was not having installed S/P combs cpld and C/P combs cpld this could have been worked electronically as the stops were = electronically controlled and yet given more scope for psalms, hymns and general accompaniment work.   The advantage of splitting the memory levels is that you don't have to = reset your divisional pistons every time you move up a level; this seems to be a problem I have encountered with some of these very large sequencer-type memory systems.   Edward -=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D--=3D-=3D-=3D-=3D Edward Marsh Director, NPC Records http://www.nutcracker-productions.com info@nutcracker-productions.com edmarsh@lineone.net   +44 (0) 191 285 4098 Phone +44 (0) 191 285 2219 Phone/Fax +44 (0) 789 975 8152 Mobile   3 Mayfield Road, Gosforth, Newcastle upon Tyne NE3 4HE England        
(back) Subject: Re: wind pressure From: Bud/Burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 08 Sep 1999 11:31:51 -0700   If there is a reed, take it as high as it will go without having the reed go off-speech; if there isn't a reed, take it as high as it will go without the trebles overblowing. 3 1/2'' to 4'' is a good guess. If you want a milder sound, take it as low as it will go and still have the bass pipes speak promptly. I presume it's a single reservoir ... just take the bricks on and off until it sounds right (grin).   Cheers,   Bud   Gary Black wrote:   > Dear list, I need to know what wind pressure the Estey co. used for > their early organs. I have a pipe organ built by them which is: opus > no. 290 built in 1905 . I am installing this in my home and need to > know what they used for wind pressure. Thanks for you help. > > Regard, > > Gary > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: "Elegy" by Thalben-Ball From: Tom Baldwin <tomba@pobox.com> Date: Wed, 08 Sep 1999 21:45:07 +0200   Bud/Burgie <budchris@earthlink.net> says: >GBOrgan tells me it's out of print ... anyone have a copy?   Yep. Bought my copy from Banks in York (UK) last November. It's published by Paxton and is their order number NOV357436. Their distributors are:   Music Sales Ltd Newmarket Road Bury St. Edmunds Suffolk IP33 3YB England   Tom  
(back) Subject: Re: priestly egos From: JDeCaria@aol.com Date: Wed, 8 Sep 1999 16:41:00 EDT   After reading the recent pipechat posts on priestly egos, i feel = compelled, as well as qualified to comment here. Roman Catholic clergy, whether = secular or religions, have had a history of being calle "authoritarian" and = "control freaks". this reputation, while a little harsh in my opinion, is not = totally undeserved.   The Roman Church has always centralized authority in its clergy, and for = very good reason. For hundreds of years, clergywere the only ones who were educated enough to efficiently administer a parish, andtend to the needs = of the community. Historically, they have served a multitude of roles, in addition to their priesty offices. They have been civil judges, = arbitrators, "doctors" (such as they were in the middle ages), and bankers, and = town/gov't administrators. While they may have functioned well in a society in which most of the population was incapable of fulfilling these roles, times have =   changed. People are not ignorant, and are quite often just as educated, = if not more so, than the clergy. Unfortunately, the total control that was at =   one time necessary for a priest to function had been merged into the = seminary training over the centuries.   In modern times (ie: since Vatican II), Church Scholars in charge of = seminary formation have moved dramatically away from anything resembling = pre-Vatican II tradition. Modern priests, trained after Vatican II have, in the vast majority of seminaries, been trained to facilitate democracy in the = running of the parish.   I disagree, not with the philosophy of democratic parish administration, = but with it's modern, extreme applications.   In today's world, a Parish Finance Council is most likely much more = competent to make financiual decisions that the parish priest alone. Likewise, the organist/music director is much more likely than the priest to be able to make decisions on musically related issues (provided of course that he is = a competent musician - that is a whole other can of worms which i will not address here).   Where I digress from the philosophy of democracy in a parish is in matter = of faith and morals. Lay people, no matter how educated, are NEVER more competent than the parish priest to instruct the falithful (of whose = immortal souls the pastor of the parish has care) on matters of faith and morals. = This precludes lay catechists, unless they are teaching from church documents provided by the pastor, and do not attempt to interpret them for the = people they are teaching. The ONLY people who have the right to interpret (that = is, to examine the documents and then decided which parts to teach or to omit, = to emphasize or de-emphasize) are validly ordained clergy. NO ONE ELSE. Another bone of contention is the concept of the "liturgist" This term is = an oxymoron -- there is no such thing as a liturgist. the function of what we =   call a liturgist is rightly reserved to the office of the ordained, and to = NO ONE ELSE. Lay people have absolutely NO right to make decisions about the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass specifically because thay cannot offer the sacrifice themselves.   Any priest who assigns some to teach catechism or to act as a "liturgist" = acts in error, and against not only the spirit of the Second Vatican = Council, but against the wishes and goals of the Two Holy Fathers of the Council, Popes John XXIII and PaulVI.   What then, is my point? In todays society, it makes the most sense to = assign tasks to the person/group who 1) has the right to deal with them, and 2) = who is most capable of dealing with them. It only makes sense to allow the = Parish Financel Council to draw up the parish budget. It makes sense to allow the =   Music Director (he is NOT a minister - the only ministers are the = ordained) to have autonomy in choosing music, planning/organizing concerts, etc. It folows then that the priests must also have autonomy in matters pertaining =   directly to his priestly office - catechisis, the Holy Sacrifice of Mass, =   and other Rites (I don't like to call them liturgies - they are NOT).   While, because he has care of the immortal souls of his flock, a pastor = has the right and the responsibility to ensure that his parish is being run economically and efficiently, he must also respect the responsibilities = and the degree of autonomy that is proper to those aforementioned groups that also make great and valuable contributions to the parish community. It is when a priest attempts to exercise absolute control over areas that he = is not qualified to, or that he has previously assigned to others, that he becomes authoritatian and draconic. This is as great a mortal sin as the other extreme of giving complete autonomy to these same groups. A Parish Cummunity is a manifestation of the living body of Christ in which all systems are dependant on each other, with the Pstor as it's head. This is = the goal envisioned by the SVC and Popes John XXIII and Paul VI. I remain,   your humble servant, Joseph DeCaria   P.S. while i claim to be an authority on the Roman Church, i make no = such claims as to my typing abilitites. please excuse any mistakes. mea culpa   In a message dated 08/09/99 9:00:24 AM Eastern Daylight Time, budchris@earthlink.net writes:   > BUT ... with a couple of notable exceptions, I found the DIOCESAN RC > clergy in > Cleveland, Cincinnati and San Diego to be absolute NIGHTMARES ... the > priests who > came through the seminary system BEFORE Vatican II were bitter > authoritarians who > saw their world crumbling, and were going to hang onto their authority > over > everything and everybody, WHATEVER the cost; the younger priests were > ignorant, > arrogant iconoclasts, hell-bent on demolishing ANYTHING that reminded > them of the > pre-Vatican II church.   > Sometimes I think the Holy Ghost preserves the Church IN SPITE OF the > priests > (AND bishops) ... Cardinal Ratzinger ... now THERE'S a REAL piece of > work, and, > like as not, he'll be the next POPE ... God HELP the Roman Catholics! > > Cheers, > > Bud >  
(back) Subject: Re: "Elegy" by Thalben-Ball From: CHERCAPA@aol.com Date: Wed, 8 Sep 1999 16:51:44 EDT   In a message dated 9/8/99 3:51:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time, = tomba@pobox.com writes:   > > Dear Tom, Do they have a web site like the Church of England bookstore. = Found that a treasure trove and interesting. Paul  
(back) Subject: Re: priestly egos From: CHERCAPA@aol.com Date: Wed, 8 Sep 1999 17:00:45 EDT   Dear Bud, I'm just curious as to why you feel that way about Ratzinger. = From what I read, he is the one who has been complaining about the goofy music = in the RC church since Vatican II and especially the American interpretation = of those directives. I don't have the original paper before me but there is a =   movement (believe it's the Oxford Movement in England) which is trying to =   return the music of the RC church back to the present church. Maybe = someone can help me or knows more about it. I try to stay out of controversy especially regarding religion but there seemed to be something about Ratzinger that I liked. LOL. Take Care, Paul  
(back) Subject: Re: Anglican hymnals in use in England (X-posted) From: "Michael Davis" <MichaelDavis@wykecottage.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Wed, 8 Sep 1999 22:02:22 +0100   I agree wholeheartedly with my good friend Richard regarding Hymns Old and New and Celebration Hymnal. However, I am looking forward to Stephen = Dean's new catholic hymnal "Laudate" which has just been published. I am eagerly awaiting my copy and will advise the list on how good it is.   On the other had, we don't use hymn books at our church. Every Sunday we produce a comprehensive leaflet which contains everything that the congregation will sing. We have all the relevant copyright permissions and now that it is all set up on computers, it is dead easy to produce a new sheet for each Sunday. I have noticed that the congregational singing has improved from very good to excellent since we have done this.     regards Michael Davis St Joseph's RC Church, Guildford, Surrey, England, UK     ----- Original Message ----- From: Richard Scott-Copeland <organist@gemshorn.freeserve.co.uk> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: 08 September 1999 11:02 Subject: Re: Anglican hymnals in use in England (X-posted)     > > It is really a rather sorry state of affairs with the Catholic church = and > hymnals! > > > Richard Scott-Copeland > Staff Organist, Portsmouth Cathedral > Parish organist, St Edmund's Catholic Church, Southampton. > Southampton > England > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >        
(back) Subject: Re: amens and grape juice From: runyonr@muohio.edu (Randolph Runyon) Date: Wed, 8 Sep 1999 18:20:31 -0700   >You know, some of us don't get along too well with wine, and it can react >disastrously with certain medicines. > Diane S. >(straight@infoblvd.net) >   Well, Ms. Straight, you do live up to your name! ; - )   I like the way I've seen it done in the U.C.C.: wine in the little = glasses in the middle of the circular tray, grape juice in the outer rings (or the other way around). Elder comes up to me as I'm playing Bach's Schmucke dich during communion and asks, wine or grape juice? Wine, please, I say. And he places it by my drawknobs. Most accommodating.   So if you had been in my place, you could have avoided any drug-alcohol side-effects by making a different choice than I.   Cheers,   Randy Runyon organist, Immanuel Presbyterian, Cincinnati      
(back) Subject: Re: a-mens on hymns From: runyonr@muohio.edu (Randolph Runyon) Date: Wed, 8 Sep 1999 19:07:32 -0700     >>Twice they applauded the prelude.   Bruce C. (as in caniniphile) replied: >That I can live without.   I imagine it wasn't me but the music I played. Didn't play it stunningly, just decently. Both are pieces that start soft and just get bigger and bigger. So just in case anyone was curious (and would like to try for a similar effect), I thought I'd say what they were. One is pretty = familiar: the Dupre' Cortege et Litanie. The other is perhaps less widely known: Boellmann's Choral, from his Douze Pieces.   We did a very contempory anthem in jazz style >(that I wrote.. blush blush) and I was so afraid they were going to >applaud, but bless their hearts, they were quiet as mice when it was >over and even allowed the sound to reverberate through the building. >They were complimentary on the front steps, which was nice!   Are you going to publish this anthem, Bruce? I'd love to take a look-see.   Randy Runyon organist, Immanuel Presbyterian, Cincinnati      
(back) Subject: Re: a-mens on hymns and unversed Catholics From: runyonr@muohio.edu (Randolph Runyon) Date: Wed, 8 Sep 1999 19:11:01 -0700   Bruce, thus: >Ah! One of my favorite hymnals. Albert J. Kissling, editor, was >pastor at Riverside Pres - Jax FL when I attended there with my father >years (!!) ago. What a fantastic preacher.... Dr. Kissling could heal >any hurt >with that wonderful smile. They just don't make 'em like that any >more!   Great story! Thanks for sharing it. > >>"Where children wade through rice fields / And >> watch the camel trains. " >We always sang this, "where children wade through rice fields to watch >the camels train."   A nice variation. Now that I think on it, rice fields are found in wet climates (like Vietnam) and camels in dry (like the Sahara). So I guess the children had pretty powerful binoculars.   Randy Runyon organist, Immanuel Presbyterian, Cincinnati