PipeChat Digest #1575 - Saturday, August 26, 2000
 
RE: computer programs/MIDI
  by "Randy Terry" <randyterry@laumc.org>
Re: computer programs/MIDI
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: Organ ID time!
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca>
Re: computer programs/MIDI
  by "Paul Soulek" <soulek@frontiernet.net>
Re: computer programs/MIDI
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Moeller opus list et al
  by <LLWheels@aol.com>
Re: Moeller opus list et al
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Moeller opus list et al
  by "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net>
Re: Organ ID time!
  by <KurtvonS@aol.com>
Re: Moeller opus list et al
  by "Brent Johnson" <bmjohns@fgi.net>
Re: Moeller opus list et al (Trying again)
  by "Brent Johnson" <bmjohns@fgi.net>
Re: Bamboo organ
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: computer programs/MIDI
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Organ ID time!
  by <DAJAMES@aol.com>
commissioning a work (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
OHS Boston, Monday 8/21
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
Re: Organ ID time!
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
 


(back) Subject: RE: computer programs/MIDI From: "Randy Terry" <randyterry@laumc.org> Date: Fri, 25 Aug 2000 16:46:18 -0700       >Finale will do this, though I don't know how to do it. It is not quite = as >simple as you seem to be looking for, however.   Thanks for the info. I am computer literate enough to find something that will be usable, I think, for what is being said. I think I could "clean = up" but I just can't think out in a slow deliberate process and input each = note and think musically! I did finally make a's and b's in theory and form & analysis, but my first year was Sooooooo hard!   Randy    
(back) Subject: Re: computer programs/MIDI From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Sat, 26 Aug 2000 07:41:11 +0800   Yes there is. I use Noteworthy which can be downloaded free from their = site. BUT my computer will not talk to the organ. I am still working on it. The = problem is not in the program which works well. If you get any answers privately I would be very interested in what is = said. Bob Elms     Randy Terry wrote:   > I have just purchased a digital organ with a Wurlitzer name on it. = Church > Organ Systems would be the present people, but this instrument was made > before the present owner came on board. > > I have played one at a colleagues house, and the sound was better than > average (not Allen Renaissance, however!) and the console is very = attractive > with wood drawknobs tracker touch, and a great appearance. I live in an > apartment so the headphone jack is a plus. > > Those of you with experience with MIDI: Is there a computer program out > there where you plug the PC into the organ and it will print out what = you > play? I improvise most of my Sunday music - and what comes out is = usually > better than sightreadable stuff you can buy. It would be interesting to = be > able to repeat something that came out worth saving. I would guess this = is > difficult, but if there is a windows based program that will do this I = would > like to know. > > Thanks in advance, > > Randy Terry > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org   -- ----------------------------------------------------- Click here for Free Video!! http://www.gohip.com/freevideo/      
(back) Subject: Re: Organ ID time! From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Date: Fri, 25 Aug 2000 19:44:57 -0400   Bob,   The console on the postcard looks very much like the Kilgen that we have = in the Jock Harty Arena , Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.   I agree with Bill Hesterman,   Bob Conway   ----- Original Message ----- From: <OrganMD@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, August 25, 2000 7:19 PM Subject: Re: Organ ID time!     > Hey Bob: > > As well as I can see the console details, it looks to me like a Kilgen > console. > > Bill Hesterman > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: computer programs/MIDI From: "Paul Soulek" <soulek@frontiernet.net> Date: Fri, 25 Aug 2000 19:22:14 -0500   > Those of you with experience with MIDI: Is there a computer program out > there where you plug the PC into the organ and it will print out what = you > play? I improvise most of my Sunday music - and what comes out is = usually > better than sightreadable stuff you can buy. It would be interesting to = be > able to repeat something that came out worth saving. I would guess this = is > difficult, but if there is a windows based program that will do this I = would > like to know.   If you want to make your playing look more like sheet music, get a program with the Quantize feature. Quantize rounds off the notes so they look more like something that would look on the page.   If you get it set right, you can record yourself and get it to play back. For this to work you need the program to record sysex (system exclusive codes). Someone else did this, take a look at <http://home.earthlink.net/~hptschupp/organp7.html>. Cakewalk v6.0 and above record sysex, that's what I use with the SCPOP (Sound Canvas Pipe Organ Project), <http://www.scpop.de> which also uses sysex. I've been doin' the 'MIDI thing' for awhile, any questions holler.   Paul Soulek  
(back) Subject: Re: computer programs/MIDI From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Fri, 25 Aug 2000 19:25:26 -0500       Randy, when I wrote:   > >Finale will do this, though I don't know how to do it. It is not quite = as > >simple as you seem to be looking for, however.   I did not mean to impugn your computer literacy.   I must say, too, that it was not completely clear what your intentions = were for the result of recording the information. If your intention is to prepare = a printed score, I would go with Finale or Sibelius (not meaning to slight Noteworthy, but there are just some things it can't do--e.g., it will do triplets, but (at least last time I upgraded), it will not do quintuplets. = If your intention is to record for playback, I would go with a sequencing = program, instead.    
(back) Subject: Moeller opus list et al From: <LLWheels@aol.com> Date: Fri, 25 Aug 2000 20:55:43 EDT   In a message dated 8/25/2000 4:00:45 AM Central Daylight Time, pipechat@pipechat.org writes:   << but OHS does have most of the paper records in their library. I don't = know why Wicks stuck in the old bean. Old age I guess. >> Probably because, if I am not mistaken -- and I'm sure 30 of y'all will correct me if i am :) -- Wicks bought all the paperwork from Aeolian = Skinner - and for a while were touting themselves as the worthy successors = thereunto. (is that a word?)   Larry L. Wheelock   Read my lips -- NO NEW TEXANS!  
(back) Subject: Re: Moeller opus list et al From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Fri, 25 Aug 2000 21:16:23 EDT   In a message dated 8/25/00 8:56:47 PM Eastern Daylight Time, = LLWheels@aol.com writes:   << Probably because, if I am not mistaken -- and I'm sure 30 of y'all will =   correct me if i am :) -- Wicks bought all the paperwork from Aeolian = Skinner - and for a while were touting themselves as the worthy successors thereunto. (is that a word?) >>   Now, now! Be nice. You all need to send the nice folks at Wicks a box = of candy. It was Rogers that bought the AEolian-Skinner stuff. (I = believe!!) ;-)   Bruce Cremona502@cs.com in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles visit the Cornely pack at Holwling Acres: Ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Moeller opus list et al From: "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net> Date: Fri, 25 Aug 2000 20:21:27 -0500   What's this about Texans? I'm not for the shrub either, but please don't = put us all in the same pot! Roy   LLWheels@aol.com wrote:   > In a message dated 8/25/2000 4:00:45 AM Central Daylight Time, > pipechat@pipechat.org writes: > > << but OHS does have most of the paper records in their library. I don't = know > why > Wicks stuck in the old bean. Old age I guess. > >> > Probably because, if I am not mistaken -- and I'm sure 30 of y'all will > correct me if i am :) -- Wicks bought all the paperwork from Aeolian = Skinner > - and for a while were touting themselves as the worthy successors = thereunto. > (is that a word?) > > Larry L. Wheelock > > Read my lips -- NO NEW TEXANS! > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ ID time! From: <KurtvonS@aol.com> Date: Fri, 25 Aug 2000 21:43:57 EDT   The organ in the Heathman Hotel lobby in Portland was a 2 man/five rank Smith. I believe it ended up by doing service in a local church, before ultimate parting out by local enthusiasts....  
(back) Subject: Re: Moeller opus list et al From: "Brent Johnson" <bmjohns@fgi.net> Date: Fri, 25 Aug 2000 22:06:58 -0500       > In a message dated 8/25/00 8:56:47 PM Eastern Daylight Time, LLWheels@aol.com > writes: > Now, now! Be nice. You all need to send the nice folks at Wicks a box of > candy. It was Rogers that bought the AEolian-Skinner stuff. (I believe!!) > ;-) >   As the only representative of Wicks on this list, I think all candy should be sent directly to me!      
(back) Subject: Re: Moeller opus list et al (Trying again) From: "Brent Johnson" <bmjohns@fgi.net> Date: Fri, 25 Aug 2000 22:07:59 -0500     > In a message dated 8/25/00 8:56:47 PM Eastern Daylight Time, LLWheels@aol.com > writes: > Now, now! Be nice. You all need to send the nice folks at Wicks a box of > candy. It was Rogers that bought the AEolian-Skinner stuff. (I believe!!) > ;-) >   As the only representative of Wicks on this list, I think all candy should be sent directly to me!   Of course, it would help if I'd sign the email! Brent Johnson The Organ Web Ring http://www.organwebring.com The Theatre Organ Web Ring http://www.organwebring.com/theatre      
(back) Subject: Re: Bamboo organ From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Fri, 25 Aug 2000 23:32:32 -0500   Bamboo (fishing pole) 1 1/2 " round and 16' long would be one *hell* of a piccolo! The postcard pic I saw of the instrument has it having an = EnChamade of something-or-other. Wonder if it has coconut shells for temple blocks?!   Rick      
(back) Subject: Re: computer programs/MIDI From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Fri, 25 Aug 2000 23:35:15 -0500   My Wurli-pipe has CakeWalk MIDI with printable features. It even plays = back the boo-boos I do! Gotta fix that.   Rick      
(back) Subject: Re: Organ ID time! From: <DAJAMES@aol.com> Date: Sat, 26 Aug 2000 00:46:54 EDT   HI this organ was a 2 manual 9 rank Smith installed when the Heathman Hotel = was built. Was transplanted to a Catholic Church in Mt. Angel, OR and later parted out.   Don James  
(back) Subject: commissioning a work (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 25 Aug 2000 22:05:01 -0700   I'm considering commissioning a setting of the Propers for the Dedication of a Church ("Terribilis est", Liber Usualis, p. 1250), but with English texts (of course) (grin). Deadline: probably late summer of 2001.   I have some pretty specific parameters:   Unison choir (range: B Flat below middle C to D an octave above middle C, with MAYBE an OCCASIONAL high E Flat or E natural)   Independent accompaniment for organ on three staves and brass quartet (two B Flat trumpets and two trombones)   The settings can be based on the modes of the originals, as follows:   Introit - mode 2 - should be substantial ... 5-7 minutes ... incensations take time Gradual - Mode 5 Alleluia - Mode 7 (could also be mode 5, as we sing the Gradual and Alleluia together, so they could be one through-composed piece) Offertory - Mode 6 - should be a substantial piece, around 10 minutes in length Communion - Mode 5   or on some related chant, like the Te Deum or Christus vincit (both in Mode 4, I think)   Except for the Introit and Offertory, the rest should be short and to the point (grin) ... 5 minutes max each.   Obviously what I'm after is conservative modal writing ... nothing avant-garde or terribly dissonant ... Durufle and Langlais are the outer limits of what my congregation will tolerate (grin).   Most of the interest should be in the vocal part and the brass parts, as we have a small, perfectly dreadful organ. About all it can do is fill in. The choir is pretty agile. For this service I'll have 16-20 singers, equally divided between men and women.   If anybody's interested, and/or has any suggestions as to who to approach, please write me privately, and I'll supply the English texts. I need to stare at them some more ... there may be better ones. I know I want "Terribilis est".   Cheers,   Bud   P.S. - my "Subscribe" message to Anglican Music came back ... does anybody have addresses for currently active Anglican music lists that I can post this to?        
(back) Subject: OHS Boston, Monday 8/21 From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Sat, 26 Aug 2000 01:43:27 EDT   On this Monday morning, as an equal-opportunity lecture-misser, of = necessity, not desire, I did not hear Alan Laufman's history of the Organ Clearing House, which he heads and has headed for many years. Like any other = regular OHS convention goer, I have, in part, lived that history, having visited parts of the country where the tentacles of the OCH have been very much in =   evidence. I recall that this was particularly so at the convention in Portland, OR, where it seemed sometimes that every new church, and there = are many new churches in that rapidly growing part of the world, had a fine = and perfectly efficient old organ in it. It made economic sense for them to = deal with OCH, both in terms of affordability, but also of the hope for real musical quality - this, along with the not unimportant fact of recycling = an excellent old organ needing a home. The Organ Clearing House and Alan = Laufman really deserve a loud Well Done.   The recitals I heard this day were part of an elective involving visiting instruments in the Newton area. The alternative was the Mount Auburn Cemetery, also available the previous day. A third choice was to do = nothing and ride a bus later to a concert at The Korean Church in Cambridge. I'd = been a bit lazy on the weekend, so guilt and the realization that there were things on offer in Newton that I really wanted to hear, caused me to hop = on the bus yet again. After all, that is what I am here for!   First stop: Church of the Redeemer, Chestnut Hill, Newton, something of a cookie-cutter Anglican pretend Gothic building, of which there must be thousands around the country. (I may be getting in trouble here - it = probably is a fine Cram building, but cliche is cliche!) I am afraid it boasted pretend Gothic acoustics as well. I sat in about the third row on the = wrong (south) side, despite the fact that the organ is in a chamber on that same =   side (with a reversed console also on that side). I was out of sight of = the case. Many early arrivers dashed for seats in the north side of the = chancel - I do believe they might have regretted it later. I have heard some recent gorgeous to-cry-for organs of Fritz Noack. I suspect this chancel installation caused him to want to push the instrument out of its = sepulchre so it could lead those in the back row of the church. I did not talk with anyone who sat back there to learn how it sounded - I should have taken a walk at a break in the music. From up front, it was overpowering.   Gretchen Longwell gave us a program that made me think we were back to the =   "real world" of the organ recital, as opposed to that of the OHS - and = this is NOT in any way a negative comment about OHS programming, or of = Gretchen's program. It was what one might play on a North German oriented mechanical organ in a good room in an academic environment, and we were almost completely an audience of organists, so it should be fine to do the = following program, but it missed one of the features of OHS programming - showing a variety of things the organ can do. Many thought that we could have heard some Vierne, Mendelssohn, or anything else that might show the Romantic possibilities. I think they were probably there in this instrument. The program:   Buxtehude - Praeludium in G Minor, rather heavy-handed with none of the lightness of touch that is so pleasing on a mechanical instrument. (We = heard it later in the week in Mean Tone tuning - a very different piece!)   Georg Boehm - Wer nur den lieben Gott laesst walten, a wonderful work beautifully played.   We sang "Wer nur den lieben Gott laesst walten" as "If thou but trust in = God to guide you." There were only two stanzas given us, so most of us turned = the second into harmony.   Two Schuebler Chorales: Meine Seele and Ach bleib bei uns, the latter something of a finger breaker, and both really well played.   Ernst/Bach - Concerto in G, a somewhat quirky but bouncy piece that I used = to play with great pride and pleasure. This was a fine performance, but I have to say that I thought it too could have used a somewhat, and only = somewhat, less legato approach to the keyboard and the action. It was also very overloud, and I think registering this instrument a bit more selectively rather than by the book would produce better results.   The next recital gave me my opportunity to hear for the first time, a new instrument built by George Bozeman, which, like its builder, is full of = color and character. Unlike George, the instrument has rather active or flexible =   wind, a bit more so than wanted, as there was clearly no room for the main =   reservoir right with the instrument - it is in the next room - and even fitted with concussion bellows, things get very occasionally a bit bouncy. =   But I really liked the whole effect, and the sound in particular. There is = an amazing wooden 16' Pedal Trombone, tremendously round and full in sound, = but not loud, and perhaps a bit slow of speech, but really fun when it opens = out. This is at Eliot Church (Congregational) in Newton Corner, Newton, and the =   recitalist was Kimberley Ann Hess, Director of Chapel Music and College Organist at Stonehill College in Easton, MA. She changed the first work on =   the program from the Buxtehude G Minor Praeludium, already heard in this convention, to the De Grigny Veni Creator Suite, played with glorious ornamentation and clarity on a very sympathetic organ in Kirnberger I. = This has been something of a Schumann year at OHS, and we heard four Sketches = from Opus 58. Last, but by no means least, Ms Hess gave us a magnificent = reading of the Bach Toccata in F (540), including the most expressive playing of = that long Pedal solo I have ever heard. Even it alone was really moving. To = "Sine Nomine," we sang "We are Your People" in glorious unison. Good for = Kimberly Ann Hess and for George Bozeman, and thanks to both.   Brian Jones always gives good value, and he has been giving it at OHS conventions seemingly forever. To be sure, his playing is always = wonderful, but he gives more, steeped as he is in the history of the instrument, OHS, =   and New England itself. I recall him playing for us in Maine, I think in 1992, in a small country church, where he eventually revealed he had grown = up pumping the organ for his aunt or some relative, in any case, who had = played at that church for many years. Later on in the program, he asked all the members of his family in attendance to please stand up, revealing that = they filled at least three long rows at the back of the church. Today's program =   began with the Lefebure-Wely Bolero de Concert, without benefit of a = thunder pedal. It was great fun anyway. Then to a fine four movement Concerto in D = by Charles Avison (1817-1953), and following that, a wonderful Jongen piece I =   don't believe I had heard, Scherzetto (Opus 108, No. 1). The next and = final work on the program was dedicated to Alan Laufman, Director of the Organ Clearing House, who, as a young man, first turned pages for Brian for the same piece quite a few years back at an OHS Convention on The Cape. In = fine form, Brian gave us a spirited reading of the Bach A Minor Prelude and = Fugue (543). We could therefore forgive him for throwing us a bit of a curve = with the final hymn, shattering our hymn singing pride just a bit. Neither the program nor our little Hymn Supplement say who wrote the tune Coe Fen = (Brian may have said it was Parry, and my English Hymnal is at church - I might = find it there), and a fine tune it is, too, but the words were on the facing = page, which made it a bit tough in reading a quite complex tune, particularly = when it came time for harmony. Brian had the grace to suggest that he expected = us to finally be really strong by the last stanza. Anyway, it is a very = strong tune, set to a John Mason text, "How shall I sing that majesty which = angels do admire." I think we were strong even before the last stanza! We have = been in First Baptist Church, Newton Centre, by the way, and the organ is a = really fine and fabulous looking piece of work by Andover, taking in bits of four Hook and Hook & Hastings organs from the last half or the 29th century. = The stencilled case pipes are truly wonderful.   We next heard the excellent Nancy Granert at The Korean Church (formerly Pilgrim U.C.C.) in Cambridgeport, Cambridge. The 22-stop Hutchings = instrument of 1886 was not very telling in a fully carpeted room, unfortunately, and = we began with three early works that, for me, just did not make sense on the instrument and in the non-intimate environment. Spanieler Tanz of Johannes =   Weck (early 16th century), "Mit ganzem Willen wuensch ich ihr" of Paumann, =   and "Kochersperger Spanieler" of Hans Kotter. We then heard two Bach = settings of Liebster Jesu, the first on the really warm Open Diapason, and the = second using the Dolce Cornet for the cantus, quiet but pungent. We then sang the =   chorale, with a chance to sing harmony in the middle stanza. The George Chadwick Canzonetta gets trotted out at OHS conventions once in a while, = but it wears well as tuneful salon music. An Offertoire by Everett Truette was =   omitted here, in the interest of time, and we next heard another, if = lesser, Salon style work by Frank Donahoe, an Impromptu. We finally heard the = (rather underwhelming) full Organ in the Arthur Foote Prelude in C. Nancy Granert = is now organist at Emmanuel Church (Boston) and Temple Sinai (Brookline), and = is on faculty at the Boston University School for the Arts. The only other = time I have heard her was at another recital in which she was fighting dead acoustics, in that case, deadened by an oversized crowd at a long-ago regional convention, playing a small Walker instrument (Enfield, CT?) well =   scaled and voiced for a small church with normally decent acoustics. We = lot stood all around the walls, around the altar, and in extra seats in each = of the aisles. The organ did not have a chance, but I distinctly recall that Nancy put in a valiant effort, and it was clear that she was and is an excellent player.   We had heard four recitals already, and it was getting on for 5 p.m., but = I (and most) did not accept the proffered escape bus to the hotel, instead opting to hear Rosalind Mohnsen at the beautiful St. Catherine of Genoa Church in Somerville, with its fine 1894 Jardine, and decent acoustic. Rosalind shared her program with a wonderful, expressive Soprano, Maura Lynch, who added a great deal of interest to the program. First, three Antiphons from the Fifteen Pieces of Dupre, which were beautiful on this instrument: His left hand is under my head, Lo, the Winter is Past, and = How Fair and Pleasant art Thou. We then sang Come Holy Ghost, Creator Blest to = a pleasant minor key tune from the Pius X Hymnal - no details given, and my copy of Pius X is at church where I am not. The two outer verses in = unison, and the two inner verses in harmony kept us happy. Melodia, Opus 59, of = Reger was next in the program, but was omitted in the interest of time. The announcement of this omission was greeted with groans of protest - I don't =   know the piece, but clearly, some did. Continuing this year's = (coincidental) presentation of lots of Schumann, we heard two of the Fugues on the name = of Bach. Ms Lynch stepped forward to the balcony rail, and sang "The Flag of Prospect Hill" of J. W. Bailey (19th Century). We were then to hear = Prelude in F, by Charles Ives, "restructured" by Charles Krigbaum, but again, the lateness of the hour ruled this out. We then sang an interesting Cantor = and Response sort of hymn "Now Help Us, Lord", with Ms Lynch serving as Cantor =   and us singing a bit of a harmony response of six notes at the end of each =   verse. We were given no printed information about this hymn, but I thought =   Rosalind said it was by Charles Ives. I may have misunderstood. Then we heard, for Soprano and Organ, "Der Schmetterling ist in die Rose = verliebt," Opus 14, No. 2 of Henry Hadley (1871-1937). Last on the program was Henry Dunham's (1853-1929) Fantasia and Fugue in d, Opus 19. The Fugue, again for time reasons, was omitted, but from the prelude, one would have to = conclude that this is a work of great significance. Rosalind Mohnsen is Director of =   Music at Immaculate Conception Church in Malden, and today, she was = playing her 15th OHS Convention recital.   Dinner on this evening was at the Charlestown Navy Yard - delicious = barbecue - rendered a bit inconvenient because someone at the Navy Yard had = forgotten to deal with chairs and tables. We are nothing if not resourceful, and managed to find places to sit and work away with plastic knives and forks = on paper plates in our laps on a low wall behind which was the beautiful and large sailing ship, Constitution! The food, by the way, really was = delicious, and when we finished it all, we were only a short walk from St. Mary Roman =   Catholic Church, Charlestown, where we heard a stunning recital by Dana Robinson. This church was one of a number of very old, large, Catholic churches we saw that have been recently carefully and beautifully = restored, as though there has been a general movement involving a new appreciation = of these old treasures. Dana Robinson is another treasure - this was a great evening of great Organ music suited to the grand old Woodberry and Harris Organ of 1892 in a fine acoustic.   We heard first Introduction and Fugue in E Minor of Horatio Parker, a = totally convincing performance on this instrument's well-developed choruses. Paul Tegels, of whom we learned nothing, joined Dana in a duet version of six Schumann Studies for Pedal Piano (Opus 56). I am not sure who was doing = what - we could not see into the balcony - but the pieces really worked with = some added richness from the four hands. The Franck E Major Chorale was = ravishing on this organ, and was followed by our rousing singing of the good old = tune to "Immaculate Mary," the Lourdes Hymn. It still gives me a warm feeling = to be able just to say that the program finished with a stunning performance = of what is, I am sure, my favorite of all the works of Widor, the complete Symphonie Gothique. I don't believe anyone was unmoved by this, as demonstrated by the great and loud standing ovation. Dr. Robinson teaches = at the School of Music of University of Illinois.   Back to the Park Plaza, tired but happy.   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com                
(back) Subject: Re: Organ ID time! From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Fri, 25 Aug 2000 22:40:05   At 07:44 PM 8/25/2000 -0400, you wrote: >The console on the postcard looks very much like the Kilgen that we have = in >the Jock Harty Arena<snip>   First of all, I think the Jock Harty Arena organ is a 1948 Hillgreen-Lane, not a Kilgen. Horseshoe consoles were an H-L trademark, even on their church organs. Harvey Smoller got one out of Ken Morgan's junkpile in Sannazay, CA last year. I wanted it, but moved tooooo slow. I have a picture of the Jock Harty H-L with the fabulous, inimitable Maynard Schutt presiding at the console. Dennis James has already pegged the Portland organ as a Smith. (!!) My dad grew up in Portland in the '20s and '30s, and remembers hearing this very organ (the Smith, that is) whilst dining = in the hotel's adjacent restaurant.   DeserTBoB