PipeChat Digest #1704 - Wednesday, December 13, 2000
 
Controlling AC and DC Motors
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
Practice instruments
  by "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net>
Re: Practice instruments
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
Re: Cesar Franck
  by "Jim" <bald1@prodigy.net>
Re: Practice Organ
  by "Jim" <bald1@prodigy.net>
Re: Practice Organ
  by "Ed Steltzer" <steltzer@gwi.net>
Practice organ
  by "Jorge Gomez" <qvixotes@yahoo.com>
Re: Controlling AC and DC Motors
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Unnecessary Quoting
  by "Jan S. VanDerStad" <dorian@nac.net>
Practice Organ
  by "Mark Hummel" <mhummel@pcug.org.au>
Santa Claus: the true story
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
French Lyrics for Cantique de Noel
  by <FiveManual@aol.com>
Re: French Lyrics for Cantique de Noel
  by <snyder@skyenet.net>
Re: Still Looking for a Blower
  by "Chris Attison" <cattison@optonline.net>
Re: Practice instruments
  by "Ron Pearcy" <ronniep@clear.net.nz>
looking for a setting.........
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
Gounod anthem
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
 

(back) Subject: Controlling AC and DC Motors From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Tue, 12 Dec 2000 19:27:15 EST     --part1_55.e98b4c0.27681c63_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 12/12/2000 7:38:31 AM Eastern Standard Time, elmsr@albanyis.com.au writes:     > A rheostat, a very heavy one, will slow a DC motor however. > Bob Elms.   With my partner at the time, I tuned my way through Juilliard, including maintaining and tuning what passed for organs in the old Juilliard = building on Claremont Avenue. We looked after the old Roosevelt (even releathered = much of it) at Judson Memorial Church on the south side of Washington Square, = then one of those old parts of NYC still on DC current. This had a mechanical feeder system, driven by a large (and quite loud) DC motor. Its speed was regulated by a large dial connected to a wire connected to the top of the = big reservoir. When the reservoir sagged, the wire pulled the dial around a semi-circle of large contacts (like part of a clock face), each one representing a higher motor speed. Anything played with lots of stops on = was always accompanied by the loud whirring of the motor. It was beautiful and =   simple, but just too noisy. This was apparently something of a stock model =   Roosevelt, on display at a major fair somewhere. Does anyone know if this instrument is still there?   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com   --part1_55.e98b4c0.27681c63_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2>In a message dated 12/12/2000 7:38:31 AM Eastern Standard Time, = <BR>elmsr@albanyis.com.au writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">A rheostat, a very = heavy one, will slow a DC motor however. <BR>Bob Elms.</FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>With my partner at the time, I tuned my way through Juilliard, = including <BR>maintaining and tuning what passed for organs in the old = Juilliard building <BR>on Claremont Avenue. We looked after the old = Roosevelt (even releathered much <BR>of it) at Judson Memorial Church on = the south side of Washington Square, then <BR>one of those old parts of = NYC still on DC current. This had a mechanical <BR>feeder system, driven = by a large (and quite loud) DC motor. Its speed was <BR>regulated by a = large dial connected to a wire connected to the top of the big = <BR>reservoir. When the reservoir sagged, the wire pulled the dial around = a <BR>semi-circle of large contacts (like part of a clock face), each one = <BR>representing a higher motor speed. Anything played with lots of stops = on was <BR>always accompanied by the loud whirring of the motor. It was = beautiful and <BR>simple, but just too noisy. This was apparently = something of a stock model <BR>Roosevelt, on display at a major fair some! where. Does anyone know if this <BR>instrument is still there? <BR> <BR>Cheers, <BR> <BR>Malcolm Wechsler <BR>www.mander-organs.com </FONT></HTML>   --part1_55.e98b4c0.27681c63_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Practice instruments From: "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net> Date: Tue, 12 Dec 2000 18:59:15 -0600   Greetings:   I am sure there are many organists looking for a suitable practice instrument, but cannot afford the cost of a new/used pipe instrument or = may not feel comfortable with an electronic substitute.   I am presently searching for a Estey reed organ, built to AGO standards. These instruments are very durable and can serve well for practice = purposes.   Although many "purists" look down at the lowly American reed organ (operating on vacuum), and the European harmoniums (working on pressure), these instruments can help develop a fine keyboard and pedal technique.   (Putting on my asbestos undergarmets)   Sincerely,   Tom Gregory First Baptist Church (An American Baptist Congregation) Waukesha, WI (Home of E. M. Skinner #592/1926)            
(back) Subject: Re: Practice instruments From: <DudelK@aol.com> Date: Tue, 12 Dec 2000 20:35:00 EST   These possibilities are all interesting. Back in the mid-60s I played = every Sunday on a 2m Estey in a little Episcopal church in Queens. It was = superior musically to the little Allen that replaced it.   A couple years ago I was able to pick up a nice 2m Rodgers with AGO pedalboard from its original owner at about the cost of a new studio = piano. Given that my apt. is about 550 sq. ft, it seemed the only practical = route. It's self-contained with a good reverb and a decent spec and voiced gently =   enough that I can practice without disturbing the neighbors. It took a = long time to find what I was looking for, but two years later I am quite satisfied, except that the urge to practice doesn't seem to manifest = itself much other than when I have a sub job. It took me a long time to come up = with the money and find what was right for me. I certainly hope that all those looking for a haus-orgel of whatever type can manage equally well. It sure =   beats schlepping out to cold churches on Saturdays to practice. The person =   from whom I bought it has a little 2m tracker with which I understand he = is quite pleased. To each his/her own, and the more the merrier! Every church =   doesn't necessarily deserve an organist, but every organist does deserve = an organ!    
(back) Subject: Re: Cesar Franck From: "Jim" <bald1@prodigy.net> Date: Tue, 12 Dec 2000 19:54:53 -0600     Robert,   I don't know what registration you are using, but most Franck pieces call for at least 8' and 4' stops. With these intonations, you should be to = use the chord with the c# in the middle without doing much "damage" to the melody line. I often find myself in the same predicament with certain pieces, and have used this method as a cheater while still keeping the = basic flow of the piece.   Jim H.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "COLASACCO, ROBERT" <RCOLASACCO@popcouncil.org> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, December 11, 2000 12:45 PM Subject: RE: Cesar Franck     > I've thought of that, it would be just a harmonic variation is that = case. I > find it hard to brake the melodic line. I keep at it hoping one day the > fingers will stretch. One problem is my "hereditary" pinkies which are = not > only small but at the top joint curve inward at an almost 45 degree = angle. I > remember one piano teacher telling me, "that's a problem"!   Snip > Sincerely, > Robert > > > -----Original Message----- > > From: Jim [mailto:bald1@prodigy.net] > > Sent: Monday, December 11, 2000 12:42 PM > > To: PipeChat > > Subject: Re: Cesar Franck > > > > > > or play the c# as the middle note of the chord instead of the bottom, > > > > Jim H > > > > > > ----- Original Message ----- > > From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> > > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > > Sent: Monday, December 11, 2000 10:01 AM > > Subject: Re: Cesar Franck > > > > > > > the chorale you're talking about is #3 in A minor, and the > > 3 notes are not > > > (c, ab, e), but rather c#, a, e. Don't forget, Franck had > > HUGE hands. I > > have > > > no problem with this chord. I can play it. I don't know of > > any way to > > > increase the stretch in anyone's hand. If you can't span > > that gap, just > > > don't play the bottom note (c#). > > > > > > Carlo > > > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & > > related topics > > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Practice Organ From: "Jim" <bald1@prodigy.net> Date: Tue, 12 Dec 2000 20:00:47 -0600   Mark,   Allen has some very fine home organs, if you can afford one. There is = also a web page for buying and selling organs, and I cannot recall what it is. = I have not book marked it since I got my new computer. If I recall, I found it by typing, "pipe organ buy" and just started surfing the results. But, there are several good instruments available for what you would pay for keyboards and appropriate sound cards.   Jim H. ----- Original Message ----- From: "Mark Hummel" <mhummel@pcug.org.au> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, December 11, 2000 9:27 PM Subject: Practice Organ     > Dear List, > > I want an organ to home for practice, but I am concerned that an > Allen etc would be overkill since the acoustics would be totally = different > in a house than in a church or large hall. > > I'm toying with the idea of building my own (I'm a programmer and play > organ as a hobby) using a PC, soundcard and some keyboards. > > I could use Gigasampler but its probably too general, and therefore too > clumsy just to use as a method of choosing stops. The other problem is > that a computer is a general computing tool, so its probably not all = that > suited for the problem. > > Another solution would be to purchase a whole set of hardware midi = modules > and connect them to keyboards. > > As far as I can tell, existing low end electronic organs aren't quite > what I'd like. (ie only 25 pedals, poor interface, clipping problems) > > Anyway, my question is: what do other people do who want to practice at > home? > > I apologise if this sort of question always pops up, but thanks for your > help, > > Mark. > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Practice Organ From: "Ed Steltzer" <steltzer@gwi.net> Date: Tue, 12 Dec 2000 21:26:29 -0500   Hi Mark   - I had a 2 m, 10 rank practice organ going in my basement for many years, but found that I spent more time working on it than practicing; disciplining myself to practice regularly on the church organ which I play on Sundays was the only way. (Also, as you say, acoustics and stoplist differences are important)   - Now retired from engineering (still playing and practicing at church), I am setting up a "PC Organ" ala Mick Berg, probably using "Building Blocks". I would be very glad to hear anyone's comments re such software; BB or anything else workable. Thanks much!   Ed in Maine   ----- Original Message ----- From: Mark Hummel <mhummel@pcug.org.au> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, December 11, 2000 10:27 PM Subject: Practice Organ     > Dear List, > > I want an organ to home for practice, but I am concerned that an > Allen etc would be overkill since the acoustics would be totally = different > in a house than in a church or large hall. > > I'm toying with the idea of building my own (I'm a programmer and play > organ as a hobby) using a PC, soundcard and some keyboards. > > I could use Gigasampler but its probably too general, and therefore too > clumsy just to use as a method of choosing stops. The other problem is > that a computer is a general computing tool, so its probably not all = that > suited for the problem. > > Another solution would be to purchase a whole set of hardware midi = modules > and connect them to keyboards. >    
(back) Subject: Practice organ From: "Jorge Gomez" <qvixotes@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 12 Dec 2000 18:50:47 -0800 (PST)   I have a PC virtual MIDI organ which plays several MIDI sounds on each keyboard, allowing octave transposition. I use Jeux soundfont with Soundblaster Live. I have a program that translates soundfont files to any temperament, so I have translated the Jeux soundfont to Meantone and Werckmeister. It sounds quite well for practising at home.   Jorge Gomez     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Shopping - Thousands of Stores. Millions of Products. http://shopping.yahoo.com/  
(back) Subject: Re: Controlling AC and DC Motors From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Wed, 13 Dec 2000 12:03:33 +0800   I remember playing a Clifton organ in Bunbury Congregational Church (West Aust.) in 1940. This organ had a detached hand operated pump - pump (with handle) and regulator were in a shed at the back door of the church several feet away from the organ. Attached to the pump handle was an eccentric crank driven by a DC motor with a system of pulleys and belt to reduce the speed of rotation to what was required to work the handle. Heath Robinson couldn't have done better. On the console was a handle operating a rheostat. The motor had to be started by moving the handle across; the lights in the church dimmed as the motor took up the load. Should the organist push the handle across too quickly the load was too great for the fuse which blew immediately. Fortunately the stop jamb also had a porcelain fuse holder and fuse situated near the organist's left ear and nearby was a roll of fuse wire which enabled the organist to repair the fuse so that the service could continue. At the time I was playing, there had been difficulty in keeping the belt from slipping off the pulley and some genius had poured some treacle on the belt in an attempt to keep it from slipping off. The result was that the belt slipped on the pulley, and the wind supply that day was indequate to support more than a couple of stops. Bob Elms.   BTW Robert Cecil Cifton was a clerk in a Government Department in the late 19th Century. He built five organs of which four remain more or less in their original form. The organs were all tracker and dated from 1878 to 1908. Pipework on some was Wm Hill.   ManderUSA@aol.com wrote:   > This had a mechanical > feeder system, driven by a large (and quite loud) DC motor. Its speed > was > regulated by a large dial connected to a wire connected to the top of > the big > reservoir. When the reservoir sagged, the wire pulled the dial around > a > semi-circle of large contacts (like part of a clock face), each one > representing a higher motor speed. Anything played with lots of stops > on was > always accompanied by the loud whirring of the motor. It was beautiful > and > simple, but just too noisy.    
(back) Subject: Unnecessary Quoting From: "Jan S. VanDerStad" <dorian@nac.net> Date: Tue, 12 Dec 2000 23:16:30 -0500   Good Evening, Pipechatters   I don't mean to sound like or take the place of the list administrators here at all, but I need to say something here, if I may have their permission. I do apologize if I am crossing the line as a list participant.   There are many of us subscribers who read a daily digest of the PipeChat messages in order to save time reading our email. That allows us to scroll through and read the messages of intrest to us. However, this becomes ineffective when we end up scrolling through numerous two-line postings followed by two hundred lines of quoted text from an earlier posting.   Can we all help each other out by only quoting text wherever appropriate? I'm sure it would make life easier for many of us.   Very Much Appreciated,   Jan S. VanDerStad  
(back) Subject: Practice Organ From: "Mark Hummel" <mhummel@pcug.org.au> Date: Wed, 13 Dec 2000 16:07:35 +1100 (EST)   Dear List,   Thank you to everyone who responded; there were lots of useful suggestions.   I'm not sure which direction I'll take yet. (It would be be nice if web sites would list prices along with products. I understand the reason why they don't, but its still quite irritating.)   Mark.      
(back) Subject: Santa Claus: the true story From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Wed, 13 Dec 2000 00:51:41 -0500   "Santa Claus: the true story"   I remember my first Christmas party with Grandma. I was just a kid. I remember tearing across town on my bike to visit her on the day my big sister dropped the bomb: "There is no Santa Claus," she jeered. "Even dummies know that!" My grandma was not the gushy kind, never had been. I fled to her that day because I knew she would be straight with me. I knew Grandma always told the truth, and I knew that the truth always went down a whole lot easier when swallowed with one of her world-famous cinnamon buns.   Grandma was home, and the buns were still warm. Between bites, I told her everything. She was ready for me. "No Santa Claus!" she snorted. "Ridiculous! Don't believe it. That rumor has been going around for years, and it makes me mad, plain mad. Now, put on your coat, and let's go."   "Go? Go where, Grandma?" I asked. I hadn't even finished my second cinnamon bun. "Where" turned out to be Kerby's General Store, the one store in town that had a little bit of just about everything. As we walked through its doors, Grandma handed me ten dollars. That was a bundle in those days. 'Take this money," she said, "and buy something for someone who needs it. I'll wait for you in the car." Then she turned and walked out of Kerby's. I was only eight years old. I'd often gone shopping with my mother, but never had I shopped for anything all by myself. The store seemed big and crowded, full of people scrambling to finish their Christmas shopping. For a few moments I just stood there, confused, clutching that ten-dollar bill, wondering what to buy, and who on earth to buy it for.   I thought of everybody I knew: my family, my friends, my neighbors, the kids at school, the people who went to my church. I was just about thought out, when I suddenly thought of Bobbie Decker. He was a kid with bad breath and messy hair, and he sat right behind me in Mrs. Pollock's grade-two class.   Bobbie Decker didn't have a coat. I knew that because he never went out for recess during the winter. His mother always wrote a note, telling the teacher that he had a cough, but all we kids knew that Bobbie Decker didn't have a cough, and he didn't have a coat. I fingered the ten dollar bill with growing excitement. I would buy Bobbie Decker a coat.   I settled on a red corduroy one that had a hood to it. It looked real warm, and he would like that. "Is this a Christmas present for someone?" the lady behind the counter asked kindly, as I laid my ten dollars down.   "Yes," I replied shyly. "It's ... for Bobbie." The nice lady smiled at me. I didn't get any change, but she put the coat in a bag and wished me a Merry Christmas.   That evening, Grandma helped me wrap the coat in Christmas paper and ribbons, and write, "To Bobbie, From Santa Claus" on it -- Grandma said that Santa always insisted on secrecy. Then she drove me over to Bobbie Decker's house, explaining as we went that I was now and forever officially one of Santa's helpers.   Grandma parked down the street from Bobbie's house, and she and I crept noiselessly and hid in the bushes by his front walk Then Grandma gave me a nudge. "All right, Santa Claus," she whispered, "get going."   I took a deep breath, dashed for his front door, threw the present down on his step, pounded his doorbell and flew back to the safety of the bushes and Grandma. Together we waited breathlessly in the darkness for the front door to open. Finally it did, and there stood Bobbie.   Forty years haven't dimmed the thrill of those moments spent shivering, beside my grandma, in Bobbie Decker's bushes. That night, I realized that those awful rumors about Santa Claus were just what Grandma said they were: ridiculous. Santa was alive and well, and we were on his team.   Happy Holidays!      
(back) Subject: French Lyrics for Cantique de Noel From: <FiveManual@aol.com> Date: Wed, 13 Dec 2000 01:00:59 EST   Does anyone have the correct French lyrics for verse one of "O Holy Night" =   (Cantique de Noel)? I would appreciate it if someone could email it to me. =   Thanks! Fivemanual@aol.com Mark  
(back) Subject: Re: French Lyrics for Cantique de Noel From: <snyder@skyenet.net> Date: Wed, 13 Dec 2000 01:23:49 -0500   I do, if someone doesn't beat me to it. I think they are in the Schirmer Sacred Favorites big vocal book. Can't think of the exact title tonight = it is too late. (52 Sacred Favorites maybe) At 01:00 AM 12/13/00 -0500, you wrote: >Does anyone have the correct French lyrics for verse one of "O Holy = Night" >(Cantique de Noel)? I would appreciate it if someone could email it to = me. >Thanks! >Fivemanual@aol.com >Mark > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > Clarice Jane Snyder snyder@skyenet.net, Web pages: (Music) http://www.geocities.com/Vienna/2059  
(back) Subject: Re: Still Looking for a Blower From: "Chris Attison" <cattison@optonline.net> Date: Wed, 13 Dec 2000 01:19:03 -0500   Have you tried the American Blower company? They post their ads in = Theatre Organ mag all the time.   Hope this helps. ----- Original Message ----- From: Bob Kinner <rkinner@one.net> To: Pipe Chat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, December 11, 2000 4:11 PM Subject: Still Looking for a Blower     > Our church is still looking for a blower: 7" or higher static wind; 1 to > 2 hp motor; with or without motor. > > Thanks, Bob > > -- > Bob Kinner AA8FH rkinner@one.net > "If at first you don't succeed, switch to power tools." Red Green > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Practice instruments From: "Ron Pearcy" <ronniep@clear.net.nz> Date: Wed, 13 Dec 2000 18:58:55 +0000 (GMT)   On 13 Dec, <DudelK@aol.com> wrote: > Every church doesn't necessarily deserve an organist, but every > organist does deserve an organ!   Now that's a truth!   Cheers Ronnie   -- ----- Ronnie Pearcy <ronniep@clear.net.nz> 17 Donegal Crescent, = Greenswood, Greenmeadows, Napier, New Zealand -------  
(back) Subject: looking for a setting......... From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Wed, 13 Dec 2000 02:24:36 -0500   I'm trying very hard to locate a setting of "Veni Creator Spiritus". I = heard it long ago, and have never been able to find it. I've been looking = through piles and piles of music for the past 10 years or so, going to almost = every church in Montreal, and that's a lot may I add!!! It's in the key of F major, with a time signature of 3/4. The first line goes like this...   C F G A--Bb B C D C A Ve-ni--Cre--a------tor--spi--i--ri-tus   A G D G A G F D B C Men-tes-tu-o-o-rum-vi-i-si-ta   They're all even quarter notes, except for the last note of each line, = which is a dotted half note. If this sounds familiar to anyone, please let me know.   Carlo          
(back) Subject: Gounod anthem From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Wed, 13 Dec 2000 02:25:16 -0500   I'm looking for a clean SATB copy of "Praise Ye The Father" by Charles Gounod. It's copyright 1893, so I'm pretty sure it's out of print. Does anyone have one? The copy I have is tattered.   Carlo