PipeChat Digest #1711 - Monday, December 18, 2000
 
Test posting
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Re: Test posting
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
Re: Test posting
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
Re: Test posting
  by "Jim" <bald1@prodigy.net>
Re: Christmas Carol
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
origin of Silent Night
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
Re: Christmas Carol
  by <quilisma@earthlink.net>
RE: Chords and Inversions for Adeste Fidelis
  by "Bert Atwood" <atwoody@ispchannel.com>
Re: origin of Silent Night
  by <SProt82850@cs.com>
Re: origin of Silent Night
  by <Tspiggle@aol.com>
But do you recall...
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: origin of Silent Night
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Fw: origin of Silent Night
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: X-post: A Casavant problem!!
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: origin of Silent Night
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
Re: origin of Silent Night
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Fw: origin of Silent Night
  by "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Fw: origin of Silent Night
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
Re: origin of Silent Night
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
RE:  Silent Night
  by <Wurlibird1@aol.com>
Re: Christmas Carol
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
Re: Silent Night
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net>
Re: Christmas Carol
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
 

(back) Subject: Test posting From: <KriderSM@aol.com> Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2000 19:17:27 EST     --part1_34.e5f7a55.27700317_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Greetings all, I have tried doing every suggestion this kind and patient list suggested. = Is this posting in plain, easy to read text ...and NO color?   Stan Krider   --part1_34.e5f7a55.27700317_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=3D2>Greetings all, <BR>I have tried doing every suggestion this kind and patient list = suggested. Is <BR>this posting in plain, easy to read text ...and NO = color? <BR> <BR>Stan Krider</FONT></HTML>   --part1_34.e5f7a55.27700317_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Test posting From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2000 19:23:57 -0500   your post came though fine Stan. I see everything in blue, but that's MY color setting <G>   Carlo    
(back) Subject: Re: Test posting From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2000 19:25:18 -0500   funny how Stan's post had nothing written at the bottom.........   Carlo    
(back) Subject: Re: Test posting From: "Jim" <bald1@prodigy.net> Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2000 18:47:35 -0600   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_000E_01C06922.FCC2C000 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   well, there you go Stan, it made it through here in living black and =3D white ----- Original Message -----=3D20 From: KriderSM@aol.com=3D20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=3D20 Sent: Monday, December 18, 2000 6:17 PM Subject: Test posting     Greetings all,=3D20 I have tried doing every suggestion this kind and patient list =3D suggested. Is=3D20 this posting in plain, easy to read text ...and NO color?=3D20   Stan Krider=3D20   ------=3D_NextPart_000_000E_01C06922.FCC2C000 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.50.4207.2601" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>well, there you go Stan, it made it = =3D through here in=3D20 living black and white</FONT></DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE=3D20 style=3D3D"PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; =3D BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px"> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message ----- </DIV> <DIV=3D20 style=3D3D"BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; FONT: 10pt arial; font-color: =3D black"><B>From:</B>=3D20 <A title=3D3DKriderSM@aol.com =3D href=3D3D"mailto:KriderSM@aol.com">KriderSM@aol.com</A>=3D20 </DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>To:</B> <A =3D title=3D3Dpipechat@pipechat.org=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org">pipechat@pipechat.org</A> </DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Sent:</B> Monday, December 18, 2000 = =3D 6:17=3D20 PM</DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Subject:</B> Test posting</DIV> <DIV><BR></DIV><FONT face=3D3Darial,helvetica><FONT size=3D3D2>Greetings = =3D all, <BR>I=3D20 have tried doing every suggestion this kind and patient list =3D suggested. Is=3D20 <BR>this posting in plain, easy to read text ...and NO color? =3D <BR><BR>Stan=3D20 Krider</FONT> </FONT></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_000E_01C06922.FCC2C000--    
(back) Subject: Re: Christmas Carol From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2000 20:24:56 -0500   The 12 Days of Christmas internet hoax has been thoroughly debunked by the San Fernando Valley Folklore Society. See their website at http://www.snopes2.com/ ; click on the Christmas tree. See also http://search.gospelcom.net/tmattingly/1999/col/col.12.22.99.html   I quote from the S.F.V. Folklore Society site:   "The differences between the Anglican Church and the Catholic Church were extrinsic to scripture, so items such as the Old and New Testaments, the Pentateuch, the Ten Commandments, the Creation, and the four gospels were common to both. No one risked punishment for possessing a Bible or discussing the "theological virtues," so there would have been no need to encode these concepts as hidden meanings in a song.   "If "The Twelve Days of Christmas" were really a song Catholics used "as memory aids to preserve the tenets of their faith" = because "to be caught with anything in writing indicating adherence to the Catholic faith could get you imprisoned," how was the essence of Catholicism passed from one generation to the next? The mere memorization of a song with a coded reference to "the Old and New Testaments" by children in no way preserves the contents of those testaments. How was this preservation of content accomplished if possessing the testaments in written form (i.e., owning a copy of the Bible) was forbidden? Did adult Catholics memorize the entire contents of the Bible without any memory aids whatsoever? The whole idea makes no sense: the contents of Catholic and Anglican bibles were the same, so owning a Bible did not expose one as a Catholic, and thus there was no need to cloak biblical concepts or contents with mnemonic devices.   "The utility of a Christmas song as a means of memorizing a catechism would be limited, since its use would obviously be restricted to the Christmas season. How was the forbidden catechism taught to children throughout the rest of the year? Where are the nursery rhymes and work songs with similar hidden meanings that Catholics would had to have created for this purpose? In fact, there is no evidence that any form of catechism-by-song was used by Catholics in England.   "Available evidence indicates that the song "The Twelve Days of Christmas" originated in France, not England. Three French versions of the song are known, and items mentioned in the song itself (the partridge, for example, which was not introduced to England from France until the late 1770s) are indicative of a French origin. France has always been Catholic.   "The twelve days of Christmas in the song are the twelve days between the birth of Christ (Christmas, December 25) and the coming of the Magi (Epiphany, January 6). Although the specific origins of the song "The Twelve Days of Christmas" are not known, it possibly began as a Twelfth Night "memory-and-forfeits" game in which the leader recited a verse, each of the players repeated the verse, the leader added another verse, and so on until one of the players made a mistake, with the player who erred having to pay a penalty, such as a offering up a kiss or a sweet. This is how the song was presented in its earliest known printed version, as it appeared in the 1780 children's book Mirth Without Mischief. (The song is apparently much older than this printed version, but we do not currently know how much older.)   "[The Twelve Days of Christmas is] a secular song that celebrates the Christmas season with imagery of gifts and dancing and music. Some misinterpretations (which are key to the alleged religious interpretation) have crept into the English = version over the years, though. For example, the fourth day's gift is four "colly birds," not four "calling birds." (The word "colly" literally means = "black as coal," and thus "colly birds" would be blackbirds.) The "five golden rings" refers not to five pieces of jewelry, but to five ring-necked pheasants. When these errors are corrected, the pattern of the first = seven gifts' all being types of birds is re-established."   In the other website whose address I gave above, Terry Mattingly tracks down the source for this latter-day myth in a Catholic priest, Father Harold Stockert, now serving at Saints Peter and Paul Byzantine Catholic Church in Granville, N.Y. He originally wrote an article for his local church newspaper, that later began popping up on the internet. Interestingly, Father Stockert claims he had extensive documentation to back up his claim about the secret meaning of the carol, "but all of my notes were ruined when our church had a plumbing leak and the basement flooded." Meanwhile, he said, his copy of the original article is on "a computer floppy disk that is so old that nobody has a machine that can = read it, anymore."   A likely story.   Randy Runyon organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: origin of Silent Night From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2000 20:55:41 -0500   I'm watching The Joy Of Music right now, and Diane just talked about the origin of Silent Night. It was very interesting. Joseph Mohr (1792-1848) = was a poet, and asked the organist of a local church, who just happened to be Franz Gruber (1787-1863) to write music for a poem. Gruber went to work, = and wrote the music for Mohr's poem (Stille Nacht) on December 24th, 1818. In the morning, Gruber discovered the organ at the church wasn't working, so the priest and Gruber performed Silent Night for the very first time, on = the guitar. Pretty neat, eh???   Carlo    
(back) Subject: Re: Christmas Carol From: <quilisma@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2000 18:09:26 -0800   The "secret" meaning of "The Twelve Days of Christmas" may or may not be = true, but there ARE *other* well-documented recusant "secrets" from that period = in England ... buttons on sleeves and jackets arranged in the pattern of the = Rosary beads, "priest-holes" for hiding priests in the manor-houses in the = North, "apostle" chests that doubled as altars, etc. ... those are part of my = family history, as my family were recusants in the North of England prior to the = Act of Toleration ... the OTHER branch rioted against the Book of Common Prayer = in Cornwall on Pentecost, 1549, so I come by my cussedness honestly (grin)   Cheers,   Bud        
(back) Subject: RE: Chords and Inversions for Adeste Fidelis From: "Bert Atwood" <atwoody@ispchannel.com> Date: Thu, 14 Dec 2000 08:21:39 -0800   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0007_01C065A6.E1C78620 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hi Rebekah - I just tried this and here's what I come up with. Note that Capital letters are major, lower case are minor. Two letters with a slash indicate the chord first and the pedal note second. The pedal notes a critical to getting the right sound. The inversions are less critical. G a7 G D7/Gb A7/E D7 G/B C G/C D7 G   O come, let us a - dore Him, Chirst, the Lord!   Hope this is what you wanted and that it works for you. By the way, I = think it's better in the key of A - that way the pedal goes all the way down to the lowest C. It's in C in the Methodist Hymnal.   -Bert- -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Rebekah Ingram Sent: Wednesday, December 13, 2000 4:37 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Chords and Inversions for Adeste Fidelis     Hi all,   I am trying to figure out the chords for the popular variation on the = last verse of Adeste Fidelis. (You know the one--everyone sings unison.) So far = I have (chords) dminor(6?), EMajor, aminor, BMajor, aminor6?....   I -know- there's something else, but I can't seem to get from a minor = back into G. Maybe if I got into D....   Can anyone help?   -Rebekah   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0007_01C065A6.E1C78620 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type content=3D3D"text/html; =3D charset=3D3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.50.4207.2601" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV> <DIV><SPAN class=3D3D520112201-14122000><FONT face=3D3DArial = color=3D3D#0000ff =3D size=3D3D2>Hi=3D20 Rebekah - I just tried this and here's what I come up with.&nbsp; Note =3D that=3D20 Capital letters are major, lower case are minor.&nbsp; Two letters with = =3D a slash=3D20 indicate the chord first and the pedal note second.&nbsp; The pedal =3D notes a=3D20 critical to getting the right sound.&nbsp; The inversions are less=3D20 critical.&nbsp; </FONT></SPAN><SPAN class=3D3D520112201-14122000><FONT =3D face=3D3DArial=3D20 color=3D3D#0000ff size=3D3D2></FONT></SPAN></DIV> <DIV><SPAN class=3D3D520112201-14122000><FONT face=3D3DArial = color=3D3D#0000ff =3D   size=3D3D2>G&nbsp;&nbsp; a7&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; G&nbsp; D7/Gb&nbsp; =3D A7/E&nbsp;=3D20 D7&nbsp; G/B&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;C&nbsp;&nbsp;G/C&nbsp; D7&nbsp;=3D20 G</FONT></SPAN></DIV> <DIV><SPAN class=3D3D520112201-14122000><FONT face=3D3DArial = color=3D3D#0000ff =3D   size=3D3D2></FONT></SPAN>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><SPAN class=3D3D520112201-14122000><FONT face=3D3DArial = color=3D3D#0000ff =3D size=3D3D2>O=3D20 come, let us&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; a = -=3D20 dore&nbsp; Him,&nbsp; Chirst,&nbsp; the Lord!</FONT></SPAN></DIV> <DIV><SPAN class=3D3D520112201-14122000><FONT face=3D3DArial = color=3D3D#0000ff =3D   size=3D3D2></FONT></SPAN>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><SPAN class=3D3D520112201-14122000><FONT face=3D3DArial = color=3D3D#0000ff =3D size=3D3D2>Hope=3D20 this is what you wanted and that it works for you.&nbsp; By the way, I =3D think=3D20 it's better in the key of A - that way the pedal goes all the way down =3D to the=3D20 lowest C.&nbsp; It's in C in the Methodist Hymnal.</FONT></SPAN></DIV> <DIV><SPAN class=3D3D520112201-14122000><FONT face=3D3DArial = color=3D3D#0000ff =3D   size=3D3D2></FONT></SPAN>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><SPAN class=3D3D520112201-14122000><FONT face=3D3DArial = color=3D3D#0000ff =3D   size=3D3D2>-Bert-</FONT></SPAN></DIV></DIV> <BLOCKQUOTE dir=3D3Dltr style=3D3D"MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px"> <DIV class=3D3DOutlookMessageHeader dir=3D3Dltr align=3D3Dleft><FONT =3D face=3D3DTahoma=3D20 size=3D3D2>-----Original Message-----<BR><B>From:</B> =3D pipechat@pipechat.org=3D20 [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]<B>On Behalf Of </B>Rebekah=3D20 Ingram<BR><B>Sent:</B> Wednesday, December 13, 2000 4:37 =3D PM<BR><B>To:</B>=3D20 PipeChat<BR><B>Subject:</B> Chords and Inversions for Adeste=3D20 Fidelis<BR><BR></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>Hi all,</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>I am trying to figure out the chords for the =3D popular=3D20 variation on the last verse of Adeste Fidelis. (You know the =3D one--everyone=3D20 sings unison.) So far I have (chords) dminor(6?), EMajor,=3D20 aminor,&nbsp;BMajor,&nbsp;aminor6?....</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>I -know- there's something else,&nbsp;but I =3D can't&nbsp;seem=3D20 to get from a minor back into G. Maybe if I got into =3D D....</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>Can anyone help?</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT =3D size=3D3D2>-Rebekah</FONT>&nbsp;</DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0007_01C065A6.E1C78620--    
(back) Subject: Re: origin of Silent Night From: <SProt82850@cs.com> Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2000 21:24:20 EST   "Gruber went to work, and wrote the music for Mohr's poem (Stille Nacht) = on December 24th, 1818. In the morning, Gruber discovered the organ at the church wasn't working, so the priest and Gruber performed Silent Night for the very first time, on = the guitar. Pretty neat, eh???"   I dont' know about neat, Carlo. Wouldn't the use of a guitar in church = been of highly questionable taste, not to mention the shock value to Catholics used to organ and choir? Granted, people would have probably been = accustomed to chamber ensembles, harpsichord, perhaps even a piano in its current evolutionary form, but a guitar? After all, Vatican II wasn't due for another 150 years! I wonder if that charming little story conveniently neglects to mention the subsequent outrage at something this novel = happening on Christmas, of all times!   And what do we suppose was wrong with the organ? It would have been a tracker most likely, so we can eliminate a power outage or worn out = leather on pneumatic pouches. Do you suppose the leather blew off the bellows? = Or perhaps mice chewed through most of the trackers? Was the humidity too = low and the wood dried out? Or perhaps the humidity was too high and the chest(s) split open? Were there lots of ciphers? Anyone out there care = to venture any educated guesses?   Feeling a little like the grinch because of too much snow here in = Minneapolis,   Steven  
(back) Subject: Re: origin of Silent Night From: <Tspiggle@aol.com> Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2000 21:34:00 EST   Supposedly, a mouse ate a hole in the bellows. Furthermore, the organ repairman didn't make his rounds until springtime, so I guess they used = the guitar for 3-4 months.   Tom  
(back) Subject: But do you recall... From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2000 21:37:03 -0500   I knew the story of the composition of "Silent Night," but do you know the origin of that other Christmas favorite, "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer"?     Read about it at:   http://www.snopes2.com/holidays/xmas/rudolph.htm   Randy Runyon organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: origin of Silent Night From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2000 21:33:43 -0500   I was always told that a mouse ate thru the leather bellows on Herr Franz Grubers organ.   Rick      
(back) Subject: Fw: origin of Silent Night From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2000 21:34:38 -0500   Was this organ in Florida, per chance? <G>   Rick     ----- Original Message ----- From: <Tspiggle@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, December 18, 2000 9:34 PM Subject: Re: origin of Silent Night     > Supposedly, a mouse ate a hole in the bellows. Furthermore, the organ > repairman didn't make his rounds until springtime, so I guess they used the > guitar for 3-4 months. > > Tom > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: X-post: A Casavant problem!! From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2000 21:40:35 -0500   Bruce-   Your list of things wrong with an organ you played- and the organman was waiting for a rebuild job to fester. Take heart my friend, things like = that happen in my neck of the cornfields too!   No wonder some organmen have bad reputations: that makes it hard for the rest of us.   Rick      
(back) Subject: Re: origin of Silent Night From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2000 21:47:28 -0500   I never mentioned anything about Catholics. I also never mentioned that a guitar was used in that church on a regular basis. It was played on a guitar, as a last-minute decision because the organ wasn't working. Why wasn't it working? I don't know. Frankly, I really don't care. The story = is nice, and not meant to be cross-examined word for word.   Carlo    
(back) Subject: Re: origin of Silent Night From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2000 21:52:38 EST   In a message dated 12/19/00 1:58:03 AM !!!First Boot!!!, = organist@total.net writes:   << Gruber discovered the organ at the church wasn't working, so the priest and Gruber performed Silent Night for the very first time, on = the guitar. Pretty neat, eh??? >>   Not really.... Sounds like a very unfortunate Christmas Eve to me! ;-(   Bruce ~ Cremona502@cs.com with the Baskerbeagles in the Beagle's Nest ~ Visit Howling Acres at Ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: origin of Silent Night From: "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2000 21:48:52 -0500   Actually I believe the organ was in Salzburg, Austria. In a church that is now called the Church of the 99 Steps. The church is used exclusively by the friars of the monastery there. One manual portative, 4 ranks. Strange temperment. The organ has since been electrified to supply wind. I accompanied a Church choir from Madeira Beach , Florida on tour an that particular church was one of the performance venues. The choir sang from the front, Organ in the loft in the back. I had to transpose three numbers into usable keys due to the temperment of the organ. Lots of fun.   At least that what the locals in Salzburg tld me before the performance and afterwards at the reception over much local beer and wine.   tom      
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: origin of Silent Night From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2000 21:54:59 -0500   Yes Tom, you're right. The church is in Salzberg, and it IS the church of the 99 steps.   Carlo    
(back) Subject: Re: origin of Silent Night From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2000 21:55:27 -0500   Well Bruce, thank God you weren't there.   Carlo    
(back) Subject: RE: Silent Night From: <Wurlibird1@aol.com> Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2000 21:57:40 EST   Ah-HAH, Gruber and Mohr. The first Praise Band. Now we know whom to = blame.   Jim  
(back) Subject: Re: Christmas Carol From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2000 22:00:59 EST     --part1_7d.e72b7a9.2770296b_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   In a message dated 12/18/2000 8:28:17 PM Eastern Standard Time, runyonr@muohio.edu writes:     > The 12 Days of Christmas internet hoax has been thoroughly debunked by = the > San Fernando Valley Folklore Society.   Well, I have to confess that true or not, I thought this fanciful and = perhaps mythological interpretation, which I had not heard before, had great = charm, so I was grateful to Daniel for posting it, and I wrote and told him so. I =   was sorry to see such heavy artillery brought out to debunk what was his innocent posting. But on the other hand, it was, in fact, fascinating = stuff.   Many of us came to know Daniel at the Boston OHS Convention this past = summer, the organization having honored him with an E. Power Biggs Fellowship.   Don't "five golden rings" represent an Audi? Who's counting?   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com   --part1_7d.e72b7a9.2770296b_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT = SIZE=3D2>In a message dated 12/18/2000 8:28:17 PM Eastern Standard Time, = <BR>runyonr@muohio.edu writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3DCITE style=3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">The 12 Days of = Christmas internet hoax has been thoroughly debunked by the <BR>San Fernando Valley Folklore Society. &nbsp;</FONT><FONT = COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" = LANG=3D"0"></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR=3D"#000000" SIZE=3D2 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" = FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0"> <BR>Well, I have to confess that true or not, I thought this fanciful and = perhaps <BR>mythological interpretation, which I had not heard before, had = great charm, <BR>so I was grateful to Daniel for posting it, and I wrote = and told him so. I <BR>was sorry to see such heavy artillery brought out = to debunk what was his <BR>innocent posting. But on the other hand, it = was, in fact, fascinating stuff. <BR> <BR>Many of us came to know Daniel at the Boston OHS Convention this past = summer, <BR>the organization having honored him with an E. Power Biggs = Fellowship. <BR> <BR>Don't "five golden rings" represent an Audi? Who's counting? <BR> <BR>Cheers, <BR> <BR>Malcolm Wechsler <BR>www.mander-organs.com &nbsp;&nbsp;</FONT></HTML>   --part1_7d.e72b7a9.2770296b_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Silent Night From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <organist@total.net> Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2000 22:00:07 -0500   regardless of what instruments were played, what was wrong with the organ, or even what color they wore to church, I for one have nothing negative to say about this story whatsoever. I think it's neat to hear about the = origins of such a famous Christmas hymn.   Carlo    
(back) Subject: Re: Christmas Carol From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2000 22:18:51 -0500   Malcolm Wechsler wrote:   >Well, I have to confess that true or not, I thought this fanciful and = perhaps >mythological interpretation, which I had not heard before, had great = charm, >so I was grateful to Daniel for posting it, and I wrote and told him so. = I >was sorry to see such heavy artillery brought out to debunk what was his >innocent posting. But on the other hand, it was, in fact, fascinating = stuff. >   I suppose I did come on a little heavy. Sorry.   My first reaction to the story Daniel posted was that it was, indeed, charming. Certainly a good conversation starter around the egg nog bowl. But then my passion for internet research got the better of me, and I was determined to track that thing down. Took all of five minutes. I'd hate to think the web will one day replace libraries. I fondly remember when I had a job working the telephone information service at the Anne Arundel County Library in Annapolis, Maryland, in 1967. People would call in with all sorts of questions, and I got to run to the stacks to track down the answers, preferably while they were still on the line. Now anyone can do it at home on their computer.   But it's all interesting, I think: not only the fanciful allegorical interpretations, but also the way these legends arise.   Guess I'd better save my cannon for something bigger than a butterfly next = time.   Randy Runyon organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati runyonr@muohio.edu