PipeChat Digest #1659 - Monday, November 13, 2000

 

Clearwater, Fl. info

  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>

Anne Mardsen Thomas Organ Lessons

  by <Cpmnhartus@aol.com>

Felix Hell in Utica, NY

  by "Douglas A Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com>

Re: Toccata Schlafes Bruder

  by <DudelK@aol.com>

Tying Repeated Notes in Hymns

  by "Michael" <scapolo@sympatico.ca>

Theatre Organ Music

  by "Stan Guy" <texstan@earthlink.net>

Re: Organ Questions/Replys

  by "Luther Melby" <lmelby@prtel.com>

Re: Tying Repeated Notes in Hymns

  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>

Re: Organ Questions/Replys

  by <TRACKELECT@cs.com>

Re: Felix Hell in Utica, NY

  by "George Lawn" <sandlawn@bayou.com>

Re: Organ Questions/Replys

  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>

 


(back) Subject: Clearwater, Fl. info From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sun, 12 Nov 2000 07:22:07 -0500   Attn. west-central Florida listers-   Having been out of touch in years, what became of Ken Hunts 4/17 Wurli = in his house (and the house itself) in the Roebling Estates on Clearwater (Harbour) Bay?   Both Ken and his wife are gone now, and I understand their son could care-less about their house and organ.   Any CFTOE'ers know?   Reply privayely if desired so's not to clog up PipeChat's mail.   Thanks, Rick dutchorgan+AEA-svs.net (x-transplant-cracker)      
(back) Subject: Anne Mardsen Thomas Organ Lessons From: <Cpmnhartus@aol.com> Date: Sun, 12 Nov 2000 16:24:26 EST   Copeman Hart America P. O. Box 292 Lewes, Delaware 19958-0292   12 November 2000   ANNE MARSDEN THOMAS ORGAN LESSONS   Those of you who receive the Church Music Quarterly from RSCM will be = familar with Anne Marsden Thomas's Organ Lesson, a most valuable feature which has =   appeared in every issue of CMQ beginning January 1998. Each lesson deals = with a different composition; discussing technique, suitable insruments, registration, technical demands, learning methods, available editions, and =   other pertinent details.   Ms. Thomas has just informed me that this most valuable resource for organ =   student and teacher alike will be reprinted in The American Organist beginning with the January issue. This announcement appears with her permission.   Many of you know Ms. Thomas as the Organist and Choirmaster of St. Giles Cripplegate Church in London as well as a brilliant organ recitalist whose =   most recent US tour took her to Harvard, Yale, Charlotte, and other = eastern venues. Her next American tour will take her to the West coast.   She is the founder and director of the Giles International Organ School, based at St. Giles Cripplegate Church with branches in Central London, SouthLondon/Kent, East of England, Manchester, the Midlands, and the Salisbury area. The school offers a complete range of teaching programmes = for all ages, syandards, and ambitions plus a special programme for young organists. For further information on the school, go to their website < www.organschool.com >.   Two summers ago, I attended the RSCM organ week at St. Giles which offered =   individual instruction, courses, lectures, and seminars at more than three =   levels. Most of the participants played in a student recital at the end of =   the week. One most impressive student was an 80 year old man who, with = less than one year's tuition at the Organ School, gave a most impressive performance.   I hope you will find this forthcoming feature in The American Organist as informative and helpful as many of us CMQ readers already have.   Sincerely,   George   George W. Bayley Senior U. S. Consultant Copeman Hart America   1-800-773-4858 Business E-Mail < copemanhartus@aol.com >.   Visit our newly revised website. < www.copemanhart.co.uk >.  
(back) Subject: Felix Hell in Utica, NY From: "Douglas A Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Sun, 12 Nov 2000 18:25:04 -0500   I apologize that I wasn't able to write this earlier, but I have been very busy.........   On Friday, Nov. Third, Felix Hell performed at the First Presbyterian Church in Utica, NY. I won't attempt to challenge Steve Best's numbers on attendees, but I can say that the place was FULL !   The program was challenging, in fact, it was practically two complete programs, totalling almost 2 hours of playing time ! With the intermission and several stops to reset the console pistons, the program was closer to three hours ! This proved the value of solid state combination actions with multiple levels of memory !   Felix demonstrated not only a mastery of the instrument both technically and artistically, but also a wonderful insight into registrations. The organ is a 1961 62 rank Phelps-Casavant (specs below). Felix was able to work around the limitations of this instrument and provide some very interesting registrations. The GREAT and POSITIVE are on flower boxes with the SWELL and CHOIR quite buried in chambers.   Felix's willingness and ability to register "Outside the box" led to a real example of what creative registrations can accomplish.   The opening of the program was the Fantasy in G Major (Bach) in which Felix started the piece on the antiphonal division !!!!!! It worked beautifully ! Many recitalists that I've heard tend to have a "set" registration that they may make some adaptations to for each venue, but are generally the same where ever they play. Not so, Mr. Hell ! His use of the antiphonal instead of the front divisions, thus avoiding the ear bleed mixtures was insightful. The antiphonal again came into play during the Prelude and Fugue in D Major, which ended the first half of the program.   In between we were graced with the Toccata in F Major, (BWV 540), Schmucke dich, O liebe Seele (BWV 654) where Felix used the organ's tremulant to great effect, the Fantasy and Fugue in G minor (BWV 542) which was rock steady, especially the trills ! O Mensch bewein dein Sunde gross (BWV 622) aptly displayed Felix's command of the softer registers of this instrument, and the Trio Sonata Number 1 in E flat Major (BWV 523) was a joy to hear! Unfortunately the console placement is such that at most we could only se the top of Felix's head - but even with that - it was obvious that he was thoroughly enjoying the entire program and especially this trio !   Following an intermission, Felix thrilled the entire audience with: Mendelssohn - Sonata No. 1 in F minor Allegro moderato e serioso Adagio Andante recitativo Allegro assai vivace   Frank - Choral No. 2 in B minor   "Now Thank We All Our God" - Karg-Elert was next and then an unusual piece: Toccata "Schlafes Bruder" by Norbert Schneider ( b 1954). I have never heard this before and it seemed to be the most difficult piece on the program (which is saying a LOT !).   For a double finale, Felix played the Adagio and Toccata from the Widor 5th followed by the Final from the Vierne 1 st. !!!! (Talk about stamina !)   And after all of that - Felix returned to the console after several standing ovations to delight us with the C. S. Lang Tuba Tune !   Felix presents a wonderful combination of youthful exuberance and technical preciseness that is unparalleled. His concerts are not something you should not miss - His concerts are something you MUST NOT miss !   Felix reminds me of a certain other bespectacled diminutive organist who also had a captivating impish smile...........but I never realized that reincarnation took 4 years, 10 months and 19 days !   The Organ: Casavant Freres 1961 3 manuals - 59 Stops - 62 ranks - 3528 pipes   GREAT 16 Quintaton 8 Principal 8 Stillflote 8 Quintaton (ext) 4 Octave 4 Chimney Flute 2 Super Octave IV Fourniture ( 1-1/3) 8 Trompette Cuivre (ch) *   SWELL   8 Rhorflote 8 Salicional 8 Vox Celeste 4 Geigen Octav 4 Nachthorn 2-2/3 Nazard 2 Waldflote III Plein Jeu (1') 16 Basson 8 Trompette 4 Hautbois   CHOIR   8 Nachthorn 8 Erzhaler 8 Klein Erzhaler 4 Klein Gedeckt 2 Gemshorn Prinzipal 1-1/3 Quinteflote III Mixture ( 2/3') 8 Krummhorn 8 Trompette Cuivre* Tremulant   POSITIV   8 Singend Gedeckt 4 Praestant 4 Koppelflote 2 Doublette II Sesquialtera (2-2/3') III Zimbal ( 1/2')   ANTIPHONAL ORGAN Ancillary GREAT 8 Cor de Nuit 8 Gemshorn 4 Singend Prinzipal 2-2/3 Nazat 2 Octav III Mixtur ( 1)   Ancillary PEDAL 16 Cor de Nuit ( ext) 8 Gemshorn ( from above)   PEDAL   32 Sub Bourdon (electronic ext.) 16 Contrabass 16 Rohrbourdon 16 Quintaton (GT) 16 Erzhaler (CH) 8 Principal 8 Rohrflote ( ext) 4 Choralbass 4 Bass recorder 2 Italian Principal IV Fourniture (4') 32 Kontraposaune (ext) 16 Bonbarde 16 Basson (SW) 8 Bombarde (ext) 4 Hautbois (SW)   NOTE: The Trumpet Cuivre, the most interesting stop on the instrument is actually a WurliTzer Trumpet complete with spun brass resonators !!!      
(back) Subject: Re: Toccata Schlafes Bruder From: <DudelK@aol.com> Date: Sun, 12 Nov 2000 18:41:24 EST   In a message dated 11/12/00 6:29:04 PM Eastern Standard Time, dougcampbell@juno.com writes:   << an unusual piece: Toccata "Schlafes Bruder" by Norbert Schneider ( b 1954). I have never heard this before and it seemed to be the most difficult piece on the program (which is saying a LOT !). >>   Is this the piece that comes near the end of the movie of the same name? I =   found a copy at Blockbuster a couple weeks ago. Quite a tour de force!   DudelK Washington, DC  
(back) Subject: Tying Repeated Notes in Hymns From: "Michael" <scapolo@sympatico.ca> Date: Sun, 12 Nov 2000 18:57:24 -0500     Twentieth century organ methods generally accept the tying of repeated = notes in hymns, especially from strong to weak beats. Does anyone know when and where this practice started? Is there any mention of this in earlier documents?   Michael        
(back) Subject: Theatre Organ Music From: "Stan Guy" <texstan@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 12 Nov 2000 20:39:17 -0600   Dear Listers---   I have begun to list a lot of arrangements by Fred Feibel, Jesse Crawford, David Coleman, Ashley Miller, Don Baker, Ethel Smith and others on eBay. To find them seach seller: texstan@earthlink.net There is such large volume it will take quite a while for me to get it all listed so please check back periodically if you are interested.   Best Regards to all,   Stan Guy      
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Questions/Replys From: "Luther Melby" <lmelby@prtel.com> Date: Sun, 12 Nov 2000 22:54:32 -0600     >>Please explain how a change of a relay affects pipe speech.<snip> > >It can't, bReWsE is mistaken. I think what he alluded to was the = response >SPEED, which indeed can be changed with a change of relay. Kilgen was >known for extremely sluggish relays and action, > >DeserTBoB > Hi, I suppose Kilgen made more than one type of action, but I had heard that Kilgen was known for very quick action.   I installed a 1925 Kilgen that seemed to me to be instant from key press to pipe sounding. This was the first organ that I set up and the speed of the EP just amazed me, as I had no idea that a pouch could collapse so quickly. Luther      
(back) Subject: Re: Tying Repeated Notes in Hymns From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sun, 12 Nov 2000 21:28:58 -0800   At 06:57 PM 11/12/2000 -0500, you wrote:   >Twentieth century organ methods generally accept the tying of repeated = notes >in hymns, especially from strong to weak beats. Does anyone know when = and >where this practice started?<snip> Is there any mention of this in = earlier >documents? > >Michael > > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Questions/Replys From: <TRACKELECT@cs.com> Date: Mon, 13 Nov 2000 00:48:46 EST   In a message dated 11/13/00 12:10:39 AM Eastern Standard Time, lmelby@prtel.com writes:   << > Hi, I suppose Kilgen made more than one type of action, but I had heard that Kilgen was known for very quick action. >> A pouch collapses only as fast as the air behind it gets pushed out. The bigger the opening the faster. This is why Skinner used double primaries. Kilgens can have unit chests with a primary (magnet) for each pipe or straight chests with a primary that has a common pouch for several pipes. Some Kilgens have both kinds of chests. I seem to remember that the unit chests are faster.   It is quite amazing to watch a big 3" valve on a test chest with a glass panel opening and closing 5 or 6 times a second. It all depends on the = size of the primary. Also the higher the pressure the faster it works (and the more impressive the effect as the wind hits you in the face!)   Alan B  
(back) Subject: Re: Felix Hell in Utica, NY From: "George Lawn" <sandlawn@bayou.com> Date: Mon, 13 Nov 2000 00:39:13 -0600   Thanks, Doug.. for the great Felix Hell review.. glad you head him... increduble musicianship..... plus techinque for days!!!   Sand Lawn        
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Questions/Replys From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 13 Nov 2000 00:45:53 -0800   At 10:54 PM 11/12/2000 -0600, you wrote: >I installed a 1925 Kilgen that seemed to me to be >instant from key press to pipe sounding. This was the first >organ that I set up and the speed of the EP just amazed >me, as I had no idea that a pouch could collapse so quickly.<snip>   Good point. SOME Kilgens were quite speedy; others seems to have interminable problems. It seemed that Kilgen relays and action that I'd been exposed to over the years just didn't "age well". Scott Foppiano illustrates this by his description of the Shrine Kilgen before repair and =   restoration..."press key, go across street, get cuppa coffee, come back, hear note..." I had also run into that phenomenon on Kilgens! The Riverside, CA "Kilgaball" (original Kimball, "updated" with a unit stopped =   flute/tibia, tongue tabs on straight rail and more theatrical trems, 1930) =   was HORRIDLY slow, even back in the '60s. This can easily be attributed = to insufficient static wind, failed pneumatics, and other problems, probably rather than original design.   DeserTBoB