PipeChat Digest #1660 - Monday, November 13, 2000

 

Re: Tying Repeated Notes in Hymns

  by "Jeffrey Trimble" <jtrimble@cc.ysu.edu>

Fw: church fire: $1M and 3 shattered pretty windows

  by "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu>

Re: Tying Repeated Notes in Hymns

  by <snyder@skyenet.net>

Re: Organ Questions/Replys

  by "Ed Kolcz" <kolcz@prodigy.net>

New children's book on pipe organs

  by <KriderSM@aol.com>

Werkprinzip as Academic Construct (xpost)

  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>

Re: Werkprinzip as Academic Construct (xpost)

  by <ScottFop@aol.com>

Re: Music for Organ Orchestra & Chorus

  by "mhev.wa" <mhev.wa@netzero.net>

 


(back) Subject: Re: Tying Repeated Notes in Hymns From: "Jeffrey Trimble" <jtrimble@cc.ysu.edu> Date: Mon, 13 Nov 2000 08:02:39 -0500   At 06:57 PM 11/12/00 -0500, you wrote: > >Twentieth century organ methods generally accept the tying of repeated = notes >in hymns, especially from strong to weak beats. Does anyone know when = and >where this practice started? Is there any mention of this in earlier >documents?   OH? Harold Gleason's Method of Organ Playing ***never*** advocated that style/technique. From which school have you been quoting from? Nor was I ever taught that except during some types of Gospel Hymns and during "Solo Style" playing.   Jeffrey A. Trimble Trinity United Methodist Church Youngstown, Ohio Very strange.  
(back) Subject: Fw: church fire: $1M and 3 shattered pretty windows From: "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu> Date: Mon, 13 Nov 2000 08:35:05 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- Sent: Monday, November 13, 2000 12:32 AM Subject: church fire: $1M and 3 shattered pretty windows     > It's Civil War era. <:( > http://www.boston.com/news/daily/12/newbury_street.htm > > Firefighters douse three-alarm > fire in Newbury Street church > > By Associated Press, 11/12/00 > > A three-alarm fire at a Newbury Street church caused $1 > million worth of damage, including several shattered = antique > stained-glass windows. > > The blaze started early Sunday morning in the sacristy of > Emmanuel Church. The fire started in a cabinet that = contained > the church's public address system. Microphone cables had > been pushed against a bare light bulb that was left on = inside > the cabinet. After several hours, the light bulb burned through > the cable and started the blaze. > > Two firefighters sustained minor injuries in the blaze. = They > were treated and released from local hospitals. Eight > homeless women and two female staff members who were > staying in a church shelter escaped unharmed. > > The firefighters had to shatter the stained-glass windows = in > order to gain access to the fire. > > "We hated to do it, but it was the only way to get in = there," > said Steve MacDonald, a Boston Fire Department > spokesman. > > MacDonald said the bulk of the $1 million damage estimate > came from the cost of the windows. > > The church suffered extensive damage to three floors of > offices. The central worship area had smoke and water > damage in addition to the broken windows. >    
(back) Subject: Re: Tying Repeated Notes in Hymns From: <snyder@skyenet.net> Date: Mon, 13 Nov 2000 08:45:18 -0500   I was taught to do this under certain circumstances. I have several methods to look it up later. I still teach and play this way hymns where the same notes and chords repeat a lot. 1. You would almost always = repeat the note in the melody. 2. Most of the time you would tie in inner voices. 3. You might tie in the bass if the other voices move. 4. You can vary from a real legato style to more definition depending on = acoustics and the different stanza of the hymn. One example of a hymn that needs tying is What a Friend we have in Jesus. At 06:57 PM 11/12/00 -0500, you wrote: > >Twentieth century organ methods generally accept the tying of repeated = notes >in hymns, especially from strong to weak beats. Does anyone know when = and >where this practice started? Is there any mention of this in earlier >documents? > >Michael > > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Clarice Jane Snyder mailto:snyder@skyenet.net, http://www.skyenet.net/~snyder        
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Questions/Replys From: "Ed Kolcz" <kolcz@prodigy.net> Date: Mon, 13 Nov 2000 09:15:41 -0500   I was the organist at the Shrine Kilgen for 7 years in the late 60's and = early 70's...and...the action wasn't quite as slow as Scott described (I've = played much worse). Like anything....you get used to it. But of course I'm = sure it was probably much worse 25 years later. The Shrine Kilgen is the first = pipe organ I ever played (I was about 14 years old at the time). It took me = about 3-4 weeks to get used to it just to play standard hymns. A bit longer for = Bach fuge's etc. especially when sitting at the nave console and playing both = the Main and Antiph. The Antiph. is located immediate proximity to the nave console. The Main is in the balcony on the other side of the building. Because of that, you would hear 'double' notes.   But now....with the new Peterson relay's....what a difference !! The = delay is only acoustic.   Ed     Bob Scarborough wrote:   > At 10:54 PM 11/12/2000 -0600, you wrote: > >I installed a 1925 Kilgen that seemed to me to be > >instant from key press to pipe sounding. This was the first > >organ that I set up and the speed of the EP just amazed > >me, as I had no idea that a pouch could collapse so quickly.<snip> > > Good point. SOME Kilgens were quite speedy; others seems to have > interminable problems. It seemed that Kilgen relays and action that I'd > been exposed to over the years just didn't "age well". Scott Foppiano > illustrates this by his description of the Shrine Kilgen before repair = and > restoration..."press key, go across street, get cuppa coffee, come back, > hear note..." I had also run into that phenomenon on Kilgens! The > Riverside, CA "Kilgaball" (original Kimball, "updated" with a unit = stopped > flute/tibia, tongue tabs on straight rail and more theatrical trems, = 1930) > was HORRIDLY slow, even back in the '60s. This can easily be attributed = to > insufficient static wind, failed pneumatics, and other problems, = probably > rather than original design. > > DeserTBoB > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: New children's book on pipe organs From: <KriderSM@aol.com> Date: Mon, 13 Nov 2000 13:56:39 EST     --part1_83.2d0d806.27419367_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Greetings, all,   The young son of minister's wife, Barbara Brodbeck, became curious about = the pipe organ and started asking lots of questions about them. Barbara went = to the library (setting a good example for her son). She couldn't find any child's books on the subject, sooooo, she wrote one.   Her book, The Amazing Pipe Organ" is now available. It follows a young preschooler, Joshua, as he waits until his legs are long enough to reach = the pedals so he can take organ lessons. Finally, his feet touch the pedals = and, as promised, Joshua goes tonhis first organ lesson.   During this first lesson, Mr Hanes, Joshua's organ teacher, explains in simple terms what a pipe organ is. He even shows Joshua a pipe. I laughed when Mr. Hanes referred to the blower as a powerful fan. Well, isn't it?   Currently, this book is available from Mrs Brodbeck in Findlay, Ohio. For more information, write her at <Barb1987@hotmail.com>   I'll not reveal who Tutti is. you'll need to read the book to find out.   Musically, Stan Krider   --part1_83.2d0d806.27419367_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><FONT SIZE=3D2>Greetings, all, <BR> <BR>The young son of minister's wife, Barbara Brodbeck, became curious = about the <BR>pipe organ and started asking lots of questions about them. = Barbara went to <BR>the library (setting a good example for her son). She = couldn't find any <BR>child's books on the subject, sooooo, she wrote one. =   <BR> <BR>Her book, The Amazing Pipe Organ" is now available. It follows a young = <BR>preschooler, Joshua, as he waits until his legs are long enough to = reach the <BR>pedals so he can take organ lessons. Finally, his feet touch = the pedals and, <BR>as promised, Joshua goes tonhis first organ lesson. <BR> <BR>During this first lesson, Mr Hanes, Joshua's organ teacher, explains = in <BR>simple terms what a pipe organ is. He even shows Joshua a pipe. I = laughed <BR>when Mr. Hanes referred to the blower as a powerful fan. Well, = isn't it? <BR> <BR>Currently, this book is available from Mrs Brodbeck in Findlay, Ohio. = For <BR>more information, write her at &lt;Barb1987@hotmail.com&gt; <BR> <BR>I'll not reveal who Tutti is. you'll need to read the book to find = out. <BR> <BR>Musically, <BR>Stan Krider</FONT></HTML>   --part1_83.2d0d806.27419367_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Werkprinzip as Academic Construct (xpost) From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 13 Nov 2000 14:33:05 EST   Doug Campbell's cross-post last week, which provided the stoplist of a = 1961 Phelps instrument, is a very good example of how within the context of academic frenzy, an entire era of organbuilding seems to have missed the = boat.   Even if one attempts an exercise of taking each division and assigning it = a position on the eclectic time-map of culture and era, one finds very = little historic precedence for what is there, appearing as a series of brustwerks =   hooked up to a keydesk.   In many such "neo" organs, the mixtures sound vulgar and strident because they relate to nothing beneath them. The mixtures are historically = too-high pitched, especially in the treble, and they sit atop a non-"foundation" of =   stopped flutes and quint flutes, and they are organs of theory, not = practice. The Swell is particularly bizarre, bearing no resemblance to ANY swell division of any culture of any era, other than its own.   Had this been a substantial two manual instrument, with a REAL full Swell, =   with a second 8' Principal; had there been a real series of mutations, all =   together, as occurs in historic instruments, had there been ONE set of historically accurate strings, real French strings, as they are called for = in the literature, instead of the noncommittal cardboard celestes we see so often in such organs; had the mixtures been low enough in pitch to = actually relate to the pitch at which music is written (8') we might be able to approach something. But funds were wasted on a Pedal mixture and 32' rattler, superfluous nazards and redundant stopped flutes, and a thin reed =   pallette that is neither flesh nor fowl.   NOW: The knee-jerk reaction to this commentary is going to be that I = should not criticize an organ that has made music for four decades, and that obviously it does its job. But do we want organs which manage to slog through hymns, and organs upon which we can "fake" SOME of the literature = for the unknowledgeable man in the pew, or do we as organists, deserve more, = and want more for our field and for our congregants? This was a case of VERY expensive ADEQUACY, and the fact remains that such organs are built all = the time today. But if we look more and more at the organs for which our literature was written, especially the organs of Bach, they are VERY much = at variance with what is being built. Any more observations?   Sebastian Matthaus Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Re: Werkprinzip as Academic Construct (xpost) From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Mon, 13 Nov 2000 15:03:14 EST     --part1_40.355a8f7.2741a302_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   BRAVO BRAVO BRAVISSSSSIMO Sebastian!!!!!!!!!! FINALLY! Thank you.....   The sentiments you expressed are exactly what I was trying to say four = years=3D =3D20 ago when I was Organist-Choirmaster at the Church of St. Th=3DE9r=3DE8se = of Lisi=3D eux=3D20 in Munhall (Pittsburgh) PA. Of course, on that "thing" one even had = problem=3D s=3D20 FAKING most of the legitimate repertoire not to mention service music. = But,=3D =3D20 in all fairness, the plenum was absolutely flawless, after all Phelps = did=3D20 specialize in that area. the flutes were quite beautiful and musical all = th=3D e=3D20 way around and the strings were, by far, the most beautiful stops on = the=3D20 entire instrument. They were absolutely divine- in fact I wanted to put = the=3D m=3D20 in the car with me when I left Pittsburgh to move back to Detroit, but = then=3D20 again the Shrine already had 6 c=3DE9l=3DE8stes that are quite nice! the = reeds=3D20=3D at=3D20 St. Th=3DE9r=3DE8se, unfortunately, were really nothing to speak of. = Casavant c=3D ame=3D20 in before I had arrived for some reason and soldered up the tuning = scrolls=3D20 and then cut them to dead length. Brant Duddy just sat there looking at = the=3D m=3D20 and shook his head.   I would rather play a 2 manual with complete and well voiced divisions = (much=3D =3D20 as Sebastian describes) than a thin 3 or 4 manual. The Austin at = Purity=3D20 Presbyterian Church in Chester, SC immediately comes to mind. That=3D20 instrument is flexible, tonally superior and can play, literally, just = about=3D =3D20 anything one can think of. And it can play it WELL! Guess what folks- = it's=3D =3D20 only 2 manuals and 35 ranks. The one I endured in Pittsburgh was 34 = ranks=3D20 distributed between SIX divisions on TWO manuals with NO general pistons. = G=3D o=3D20 figure. Thank you, once again, Lawrence Phelps and your contemporaries.   Every organ has SOMETHING to offer, whether it be the plenum chorus, = the=3D20 reeds, the flutes, the expression, the general cancel (in many cases) or = the=3D =3D20 blower OFF switch (in many MORE cases). But I comment on the Kilgen = once=3D20 more because it was designed with exceptionally complete divisions instead = o=3D f=3D20 along someone's egocentric ideals. Additionally, it was voiced so that = it=3D20 could accurately and convincingly play many types of literature as well = as=3D20 the Liturgical demands placed upon it daily.   Sebastian's original (and quite brilliant) post is below for those of you = wh=3D o=3D20 may have not read it yet. =3D20   SCOTT F. FOPPIANO, Principal Organist and Director of Music THE NATIONAL SHRINE OF THE LITTLE FLOWER, Royal Oak, MI (Geo. Kilgen & Son Pipe Organ Co., St. Louis, MO, Opus 5180, 1933) Staff House Organist, THE FOX THEATRE, Detroit, MI (Wurlitzer, 1928) "Cantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat dicens: fiat cor meum immaculatum ut non confundar."     In a message dated 11/13/00 2:35:36 PM Eastern Standard Time,=3D20 TubaMagna@aol.com writes:   > Doug Campbell's cross-post last week, which provided the stoplist of a = 196=3D 1=3D20 > Phelps instrument, is a very good example of how within the context = of=3D20 > academic frenzy, an entire era of organbuilding seems to have missed = the=3D20 > boat. >=3D20 > Even if one attempts an exercise of taking each division and assigning = it=3D20=3D a=3D20 > position on the eclectic time-map of culture and era, one finds very = littl=3D e=3D20 > historic precedence for what is there, appearing as a series of = brustwerks=3D =3D20 > hooked up to a keydesk. >=3D20 > In many such "neo" organs, the mixtures sound vulgar and strident = because=3D20 > they relate to nothing beneath them. The mixtures are historically=3D20 > too-high=3D20 > pitched, especially in the treble, and they sit atop a non-"foundation" = of=3D =3D20 > stopped flutes and quint flutes, and they are organs of theory, not=3D20 > practice.=3D20 > The Swell is particularly bizarre, bearing no resemblance to ANY = swell=3D20 > division of any culture of any era, other than its own. >=3D20 > Had this been a substantial two manual instrument, with a REAL full = Swell,=3D =3D20 > with a second 8' Principal; had there been a real series of mutations, = all=3D =3D20 > together, as occurs in historic instruments, had there been ONE set = of=3D20 > historically accurate strings, real French strings, as they are called = for=3D =3D20 > in=3D20 > the literature, instead of the noncommittal cardboard celestes we see = so=3D20 > often in such organs; had the mixtures been low enough in pitch to=3D20 > actually=3D20 > relate to the pitch at which music is written (8') we might be able = to=3D20 > approach something. But funds were wasted on a Pedal mixture and = 32'=3D20 > rattler, superfluous nazards and redundant stopped flutes, and a thin = reed=3D =3D20 > pallette that is neither flesh nor fowl. >=3D20 > NOW: The knee-jerk reaction to this commentary is going to be that = I=3D20 > should=3D20 > not criticize an organ that has made music for four decades, and = that=3D20 > obviously it does its job. But do we want organs which manage to = slog=3D20 > through hymns, and organs upon which we can "fake" SOME of the = literature=3D20 > for=3D20 > the unknowledgeable man in the pew, or do we as organists, deserve = more,=3D20 > and=3D20 > want more for our field and for our congregants? This was a case of = VERY=3D20 > expensive ADEQUACY, and the fact remains that such organs are built all = th=3D e=3D20 > time today. But if we look more and more at the organs for which = our=3D20 > literature was written, especially the organs of Bach, they are VERY = much=3D20 > at=3D20 > variance with what is being built. Any more observations? >=3D20 > Sebastian Matthaus Gluck > New York City >=3D20       --part1_40.355a8f7.2741a302_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"ISO-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <HTML><FONT SIZE=3D3D2>BRAVO BRAVO BRAVISSSSSIMO Sebastian!!!!!!!!!! = FINALLY!=3D &nbsp;Thank you..... <BR> <BR>The sentiments you expressed are exactly what I was trying to say four = y=3D ears <BR>ago when I was Organist-Choirmaster at the Church of St. = Th=3DE9r=3DE8s=3D e of Lisieux <BR>in Munhall (Pittsburgh) PA. &nbsp;Of course, on that = "thing=3D " one even had problems <BR>FAKING most of the legitimate repertoire not = to=3D20=3D mention service music. &nbsp;But, <BR>in all fairness, the plenum was = absolu=3D tely flawless, after all Phelps did <BR>specialize in that area. &nbsp;the = f=3D lutes were quite beautiful and musical all the <BR>way around and the = string=3D s were, by far, the most beautiful stops on the <BR>entire instrument. = &nbsp=3D ;They were absolutely divine- in fact I wanted to put them <BR>in the car = wi=3D th me when I left Pittsburgh to move back to Detroit, but then <BR>again = the=3D Shrine already had 6 c=3DE9l=3DE8stes that are quite nice! &nbsp;the = reeds at <=3D BR>St. Th=3DE9r=3DE8se, unfortunately, were really nothing to speak of. = &nbsp;Ca=3D savant came <BR>in before I had arrived for some reason and soldered up = the=3D20=3D tuning scrolls <BR>and then cut them to dead length. &nbsp;Brant Duddy = just=3D20=3D sat there looking at them <BR>and shook his head. <BR> <BR>I would rather play a 2 manual with complete and well voiced divisions = (=3D much <BR>as Sebastian describes) than a thin 3 or 4 manual. &nbsp;The = Austin=3D at Purity <BR>Presbyterian Church in Chester, SC immediately comes to = mind.=3D &nbsp;That <BR>instrument is flexible, tonally superior and can play, = liter=3D ally, just about <BR>anything one can think of. &nbsp;And it can play it = WEL=3D L! &nbsp;Guess what folks- it's <BR>only 2 manuals and 35 ranks. &nbsp;The = o=3D ne I endured in Pittsburgh was 34 ranks <BR>distributed between SIX = division=3D s on TWO manuals with NO general pistons. &nbsp;Go <BR>figure. &nbsp;Thank = y=3D ou, once again, Lawrence Phelps and your contemporaries. <BR> <BR>Every organ has SOMETHING to offer, whether it be the plenum chorus, = the=3D <BR>reeds, the flutes, the expression, the general cancel (in many cases) = o=3D r the <BR>blower OFF switch (in many MORE cases). &nbsp;But I comment on = the=3D Kilgen once <BR>more because it was designed with exceptionally complete = di=3D visions instead of <BR>along someone's egocentric ideals. Additionally, it w=3D as voiced so that it <BR>could accurately and convincingly play many types = o=3D f literature as well as <BR>the Liturgical demands placed upon it daily. <BR> <BR>Sebastian's original (and quite brilliant) post is below for those of = yo=3D u who <BR>may have not read it yet. &nbsp; <BR> <BR><B>SCOTT F. FOPPIANO</B>, Principal Organist and Director of Music <BR>THE NATIONAL SHRINE OF THE LITTLE FLOWER, Royal Oak, MI <BR>(Geo. Kilgen &amp; Son Pipe Organ Co., St. Louis, MO, Opus 5180, 1933) <BR>Staff House Organist, THE FOX THEATRE, Detroit, MI (Wurlitzer, 1928) <BR><I>"Cantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat dicens: <BR>fiat cor meum immaculatum ut non confundar."</I> <BR> <BR> <BR>In a message dated 11/13/00 2:35:36 PM Eastern Standard Time, = <BR>TubaMa=3D gna@aol.com writes: <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=3D3DCITE style=3D3D"BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; = MARGIN-=3D LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Doug Campbell's = cross-post=3D20=3D last week, which provided the stoplist of a 1961=3D20 <BR>Phelps instrument, is a very good example of how within the context = of=3D20 <BR>academic frenzy, an entire era of organbuilding seems to have missed = the=3D <BR>boat. <BR> <BR>Even if one attempts an exercise of taking each division and assigning = i=3D t a=3D20 <BR>position on the eclectic time-map of culture and era, one finds very = lit=3D tle=3D20 <BR>historic precedence for what is there, appearing as a series of = brustwer=3D ks=3D20 <BR>hooked up to a keydesk. <BR> <BR>In many such "neo" organs, the mixtures sound vulgar and strident = becaus=3D e=3D20 <BR>they relate to nothing beneath them. &nbsp;The mixtures are = historically=3D <BR>too-high=3D20 <BR>pitched, especially in the treble, and they sit atop a = non-"foundation"=3D20=3D of=3D20 <BR>stopped flutes and quint flutes, and they are organs of theory, not = <BR>=3D practice.=3D20 <BR>The Swell is particularly bizarre, bearing no resemblance to ANY = swell=3D20 <BR>division of any culture of any era, other than its own. <BR> <BR>Had this been a substantial two manual instrument, with a REAL full = Swel=3D l,=3D20 <BR>with a second 8' Principal; had there been a real series of mutations, = a=3D ll=3D20 <BR>together, as occurs in historic instruments, had there been ONE set = of=3D20 <BR>historically accurate strings, real French strings, as they are called = f=3D or <BR>in=3D20 <BR>the literature, instead of the noncommittal cardboard celestes we see = so=3D =3D20 <BR>often in such organs; &nbsp;had the mixtures been low enough in pitch = to=3D <BR>actually=3D20 <BR>relate to the pitch at which music is written (8') we might be able = to=3D20 <BR>approach something. &nbsp;But funds were wasted on a Pedal mixture and = 3=3D 2'=3D20 <BR>rattler, superfluous nazards and redundant stopped flutes, and a thin = re=3D ed=3D20 <BR>pallette that is neither flesh nor fowl. <BR> <BR>NOW: &nbsp;The knee-jerk reaction to this commentary is going to be = that=3D I <BR>should=3D20 <BR>not criticize an organ that has made music for four decades, and = that=3D20 <BR>obviously it does its job. &nbsp;But do we want organs which manage to = s=3D log=3D20 <BR>through hymns, and organs upon which we can "fake" SOME of the = literatur=3D e <BR>for=3D20 <BR>the unknowledgeable man in the pew, or do we as organists, deserve = more,=3D <BR>and=3D20 <BR>want more for our field and for our congregants? &nbsp;This was a case = o=3D f VERY=3D20 <BR>expensive ADEQUACY, and the fact remains that such organs are built = all=3D20=3D the=3D20 <BR>time today. &nbsp;But if we look more and more at the organs for which = o=3D ur=3D20 <BR>literature was written, especially the organs of Bach, they are VERY = muc=3D h <BR>at=3D20 <BR>variance with what is being built. &nbsp;Any more observations? <BR> <BR>Sebastian Matthaus Gluck <BR>New York City <BR></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR> <BR></FONT></HTML>   --part1_40.355a8f7.2741a302_boundary--  
(back) Subject: Re: Music for Organ Orchestra & Chorus From: "mhev.wa" <mhev.wa@netzero.net> Date: Mon, 13 Nov 2000 13:02:42 -0800   According to someone I met who has actually been to the Bayreuth Festival, the Festival does have an organ for this very scene as mentioned below...   Who made it? Anyone have any info at all, the website does not seem to say ....   ----- Original Message ----- Sent: 03 November, 2000 19:44 Subject: Re: Music for Organ Orchestra & Chorus     The opening scene from _Die Meistersinger von N=FCrnberg_ is = WONDERFUL, with organ doubling the chorus in the chorale, while the orchestra plays = the interludes (including the leitmotives), making it thus somewhat like an "extended chorale" such as is "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring."             ____________NetZero Free Internet Access and Email_________ Download Now http://www.netzero.net/download/index.html Request a CDROM 1-800-333-3633 ___________________________________________________________