PipeChat Digest #1669 - Tuesday, November 21, 2000

 

A nice start for a Monday, and perhaps a lesson for us  all...<long>

  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>

Re: A nice start for a Monday, and perhaps a lesson for us  all...<long>

  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>

Re: Organ Building during WWII

  by "WDBabcock" <WDBabcock@email.msn.com>

(no subject)

  by "Thomas White" <tomwhite@hamptons.com>

Re: A nice start for a Monday..

  by <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>

Re: A nice start for a Monday, and perhaps a lesson for us  all...<long>

  by <GRSCoLVR@aol.com>

Re: Misspelling on an Allen 301

  by <Puppydawgbreath@cs.com>

Re: Misspelling on an Allen 301

  by <Puppydawgbreath@cs.com>

Re:

  by <Bobmac36@aol.com>

Re: Further documentation for PC Organ?

  by <MickBerg@aol.com>

 


(back) Subject: A nice start for a Monday, and perhaps a lesson for us all...<long> From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 19:57:47 -0600   Greetings, friends!   Something neat happened to me this morning that I just can't help but = share with you all. I hope y'all don't take this as 'bragging' on my part (nothing could be further from the truth!!) -- I am just beside myself = that something so simple on my part had such an effect without me even = realizing it...but I'm getting ahead of my own story...<G>   A couple weeks ago, I had just arrived at the Chapel of the College of the Ozarks in Point Lookout, MO for a scheduled tuning trip. [The organ = there, BTW, is a transplanted 4m EM Skinner, which (though ailing from age, the move years ago, and a few "modernizations" since its arrival there) still holds its own rather satisfactorily]. I'd just sat down at the console = and started to check the condition of the tuning of the beast when someone approached and got my attention. He introduced himself as one of the chaperones of a group (probably 75 or so?) of junior-high school kids that were touring the campus that day, and were on their way towards the = Chapel. He wondered if their presence there was going to disrupt what I was = doing, and said that he'd gladly keep them out of the Chapel if I thought it would. (A very generous and polite offer on his part, I thought!)   Well, I didn't see any major reason that they would bother me during my work, (presuming that they didn't all come in screaming and hollering....<G>), and so I told him to bring them on in. (it is an impressive Chapel to see...) Actually, I was more concerned that the inherent noise of tuning would bother *their* tour, and mentioned that to him as well. His response: "Oh, don't worry about that -- it'll be good for them to be able to hear some of what an organ sounds like. Do you think you could play a few notes on it for them?" I said "Well, I suppose so..., I could probably bang out a few notes of something, so they could = at least hear a little of what the instrument is supposed to sound like..."   And off he went to rejoin his group wherever they were. I climbed up into the Swell and started tuning reeds. Several minutes later, my keyholder stopped and said "the kids are here -- are 'ya gonna come down and play something for them?"   I climbed back down, to find the back three or so rows of pews in the church full of the kids -- seated and quiet, looking around at the = interior of the Chapel. I took to the bench, set a rather full combination, and launched into about the *only* thing I can sorta-play "off the cuff" -- = the loud part of the "dubious" Dubois Toccata. (bear in mind, everyone -- I = am an organ technician -- NOT an organist!! I play just as much as I need to for my own amusement.) Ended it up with the Tutti for the final chord. Not a note-perfect performance by any means, but I basically made it through it...<G>   The kids clapped -- I bowed briefly over the console -- and they started = to file out. (in retrospect, one thing I remember particularly was how quiet they all were while in the chapel -- I never heard them coming *or* = going!) The chaperone that had spoken to me came back up and thanked me for the "demo", saying how much he'd enjoyed hearing the instrument and that he = was sure that the kids had as well. I gave him one of my business cards and told him that I was happy to have helped, and that I hoped that the kids had in fact enjoyed it. Then, I climbed back up into the organ and we = went back to the tuning. A few hours later, we were done there, and went on to the next church, and then on home.   I more-or-less forgot about it all in the ensuing weeks.   Now, to the wonderful Monday-morning surprise. When the mail arrived at the shop this morning, I was presented with a large envelope addressed to me c/o the Company, from the "Green Team" at "Willard Jr. High School". I thought to myself: "what the heck is THIS?" (remember, I'd basically forgotten about the impromptu demo at the College) and opened the envelope to see.   What I found threw me for a loop. Inside was a note from the four teachers of the group of kids thanking me for taking time to play for them, as well as a couple dozen individual notes of thanks from the students themselves. WOW!! -- how completely and totally unexpected!! I was really and truly rather "wrecked" (but in a good way!).   And here, I think, might lie the important lesson for us all within this extended story: Today's young people are CERTAINLY capable of enjoying = the organ and organ music -- just as much so as we ourselves do, I bet -- they just need a chance to experience it and find out for themselves that the organ is not just "Halloween and Church". This chance NEED NOT be a "formal concert" or "musical education" -- the simplest little exposure = (my demo would qualify for those terms!) to the instrument and its music can work just as well.   Somehow, (quite indavertently!) I think I proved that to myself. I hope that some of those students will remember that day at the C of O Chapel into the future -- and with slightly more open minds to the possibilities of music produced by an organ instead of the more-typical-these-days amplifiers and loudspeakers. Judging by their individual comments, I = think they will.   I feel good for that.   Thanks, all, for reading my story.   Tim Bovard, Technician Nichols and Simpson, Inc. Little Rock AR <tmbovard@arkansas.net>          
(back) Subject: Re: A nice start for a Monday, and perhaps a lesson for us all...<long> From: <DRAWKNOB@aol.com> Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 21:27:38 EST   Hi Tim,   That is a truly moving story... I'm verklempt. Where are these polite and =   reverent kids and why are there not more of them?!? Who knows, you may = have inspired a pianist in the lot to become a budding organist!   Good job!   John A. Gambill, Jr. Organist/Choirmaster Oak Cliff Lutheran Church Dallas, TX  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Building during WWII From: "WDBabcock" <WDBabcock@email.msn.com> Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 20:25:25 -0600   Nelson, Thanks for the great history lesson. William D. "Bill" Babcock WDBabcock@msn.com wbabcock@lansing.lib.il.us My goal is to be the person my dog thinks I am. ----- Original Message ----- From: "Nelson Denton" <ndenton@cgocable.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, November 19, 2000 7:52 PM Subject: Re: Organ Building during WWII     > In Canada organ production was also severly curtailed. Both in WW1 and WW2 > my family's company was almost completely shut down due to the fact that > the entire workforce was in the armed forces including my father and all my > uncles and great uncles . ( remember like Europe, Canada was at war much > longer than the U.S. was and thus suffered much greater shortages in > materials and workforces.) Granddad was the only one left working in our > firm during both wars. He was in the army himself during both wars but was > refused active duty due to a heart condition. He served as a bandsman in > the local recruiting armouries boosting morale and helping with the > training of the troops. All his spare time was spent servicing the organs in > our area. ( probably about 200). Grandad was forced to service and build > organs using whatever bits and pieces he could salvage from old instruments > and he was forced to use such things as soup cans for tuning slides! Most > supplies such as wire, wood, glues, paints, metals were totally non-existant > for purchase.Gas rationing prevented most companies from traveling about > the country so a mutual support pact was formed where each company looked > after all the organs in their own area and gave the others in other areas > the service rights to theirs. Even after the 2nd World War -well into the > 1950's, most Canadian organ companies were working with almost no supplies > of any kind. I service a few Casavants and Woodstocks from the late 1940's > and the materials are extremely poor quality compared to the pre-war times.. > The same great skill was used but they were built from wood that was > obviously recycled or full of knots and flaws. Pipework was also recycled > and much was reused that should never have been. I've still got a letter > from W. H. Reisner & Co. from well after the war stating the fact that > they could not send out the order of ~200 electric valves that Granddad > had ordered in 1942 for another 2 years or more due to war shortages!! > > Sadly few companies were able to survive the combined toll of 2 World Wars > and the Great Depression. 30 years of constant upheaval destroyed almost all > of them. History records over 100 piano and organ companies in Canada > folded during these years. Many were very large companies employing > hundreds of people. > > The 1950's didn't help the few who were left as the influx of cheap > electronic substitutes and asian imports of cheap pianos made profits very > slim. > > Not one piano company survives today in Canada and the organ trade is also > made up of almost all small family run companies. > > A far cry from the 12+ major companies that existed in Hamilton alone at > the turn of the century. Even the Encyclopeadia Brittanica referred to > Hamilton as being major supplier of musical instruments to the world! > > Now there are just the 2 of us. Janine and me. > > > Nelson Denton > R. A. Denton and Son > Hamilton Ontario Canada > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >        
(back) Subject: From: "Thomas White" <tomwhite@hamptons.com> Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 23:12:20 -0500   DEAR LIST   I'M LOOKING OR FRED SWAN'S BIRTH YEAR.   iF YOU CAN HELP PLEASE SEND DIRECTLY,   THANKS,   tomwhite@hamptons.com  
(back) Subject: Re: A nice start for a Monday.. From: <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net> Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 23:17:34 -0500 (EST)   Tim, you have proven that children will live up to whatever expectations we have of them (almost without exception). And, if they are not told that organ music is scary, boring, or whatever negative adjective we can throw on it, then they will probably NOT consider organ music scary, boring, or whatever.   At my church, I have given little demonstrations to the nursery school children, and they are always thrilled with the sounds. One year, we even let the children climb into the great chamber (it was nerve-wracking, but they all made it down to ground zero alive and intact).   Before the change in staff, I usually would teach 2 or 3 sessions of confirmation class, culminating in a trip to the organ chamber. Unfortunately, I'm no longer given the opportunity. Alas.   Peace to you all, Neil B.    
(back) Subject: Re: A nice start for a Monday, and perhaps a lesson for us all...<long> From: <GRSCoLVR@aol.com> Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 23:44:28 EST   Tim--- What a wonderful story,,,,thanks so much for sharing. Regards, ---Roc L V Rockafellow  
(back) Subject: Re: Misspelling on an Allen 301 From: <Puppydawgbreath@cs.com> Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 00:05:41 EST   In a message dated 11/20/00 5:36:18 PM Eastern Standard Time, RMaryman@aol.com writes:   << AND let us not forget the unique feature of the 600 series (dual computers) that allows you to have >celeste ANYTHING< such as Celeste Trompete, = celeste mixtur, >>   But how could you forget the CHAMADE (anything).... there's nothing like = a Gamba Celeste CHAMADE... wooohooooooooo   Bruce, still in the Beagles Nest with the Baskerbeagles... visit us: Ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502 (aroooooooooO) but working from another computer since mine is in a REALLLY REALLLLY BAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAD MOOOD!!! (It's gone to the detention center for a couple of weeks)  
(back) Subject: Re: Misspelling on an Allen 301 From: <Puppydawgbreath@cs.com> Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 00:07:56 EST   In a message dated 11/20/00 5:52:17 PM Eastern Standard Time, randyterry@laumc.org writes:   << We didn't have a 32' Bourdon, but I enjoyed putting the transposer all = the way down and putting on my slush registration, playing up an octave or = two in the manuals, and playing the pedal in the bass. >>   Oh gee! All this decadence is coming back to me. We had a 32 Bombarde = and a 32 Bourdon, and if the hymns were really good I'd dial the transposer = down and transpose thehymn up a fifth so that I'd have a nice 64' pedal. Sickness divine!!   Bruce, still in the Beagles Nest with the Baskerbeagles... visit us: Ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502 (aroooooooooO) but working from another computer since mine is in a REALLLY REALLLLY BAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAD MOOOD!!! (It's gone to the detention center for a couple of weeks)  
(back) Subject: Re: From: <Bobmac36@aol.com> Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 00:21:05 EST   If you're listing it somewhere, I hope you will print Frederick Swann - = not the incorrect Fred Swan. Thanks.  
(back) Subject: Re: Further documentation for PC Organ? From: <MickBerg@aol.com> Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 03:26:53 EST     --part1_5b.e3e1f56.274b8bcd_boundary Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   Hi all PC Orglers.   In answer to Ed Steltzer's post; re couplers and combination action for = the PC organ.   Doing couplers in BB is not as simple as it seems, I'm afraid. Remember = that MIDI is a serial system, a stream of commands one after the other. If you have manuals coupled together, and you play a note on one, and hold it = down, and then play and release that same note on the coupled manual, the note = will stop, because the MIDI steam received a Note off. I tried to implement my Floating Echo division in BB, and ran into this problem. The same thing = will happen with intramanual Octave and Sub-octave couplers. Hold down a note, = and hold down and release the note an octave above, and when it is released = the octave note will stop, even though you are still holding the note an = octave below. If you can find a way to get round this problem, let us know!   I think that I am now willing to put a BB structure that actually is the basics of a PC organ up on my web page for download. But it won't be for = a while, as I am going to England over Thanksgiving. As BB looks so much = like a block diagram, I think this would work well for you. (Ed requested a block =   diagram)   There are still a few problems with the system, for example, I haven't as = yet found out how to fix the tremulant using Controller 1. It is too strong in =   Jeux, and too fast in Pfeifenorgel. I could go back to my old clumsy = velocity modulation method, which worked fine, but was very calculation-intensive, = and used up too many computer resources and CPU time.   A combination action would be quite easy, I think. BB has all kinds of modules to do quite complex mathematical things, and it's a lot of fun playing around with it. Again, my console has a combination action, so I haven't spent any time trying to do it in BB. I think Douglas Mc Murray = has had a go at it.   Mick Berg.   --part1_5b.e3e1f56.274b8bcd_boundary Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT SIZE=3D2>Hi all PC Orglers. <BR> <BR>In answer to Ed Steltzer's post; re couplers and combination action = for the <BR>PC organ. <BR> <BR>Doing couplers in BB is not as simple as it seems, I'm afraid. = Remember that <BR>MIDI is a serial system, a stream of commands one after = the other. If you <BR>have manuals coupled together, and you play a note = on one, and hold it down, <BR>and then play and release that same note on = the coupled manual, the note will <BR>stop, because the MIDI steam = received a Note off. I tried to implement my <BR>Floating Echo division in = BB, and ran into this problem. The same thing will <BR>happen with = intramanual Octave and Sub-octave couplers. Hold down a note, and <BR>hold = down and release the note an octave above, and when it is released the = <BR>octave note will stop, even though you are still holding the note an = octave <BR>below. If you can find a way to get round this problem, let us = know! <BR> <BR>I think that I am now willing to put a BB structure that actually is = the <BR>basics of a PC organ up on my web page for download. &nbsp;But it = won't be for a <BR>while, as I am going to England over Thanksgiving. As = BB looks so much like a <BR>block diagram, I think this would work well = for you. (Ed requested a block <BR>diagram) <BR> <BR>There are still a few problems with the system, for example, I haven't = as yet <BR>found out how to fix the tremulant using Controller 1. It is = too strong in <BR>Jeux, and too fast in Pfeifenorgel. I could go back to = my old clumsy velocity <BR>modulation method, which worked fine, but was = very calculation-intensive, and <BR>used up too many computer resources = and CPU time. <BR> <BR>A combination action would be quite easy, I think. &nbsp;BB has all = kinds of <BR>modules to do quite complex mathematical things, and it's a = lot of fun <BR>playing around with it. &nbsp;Again, my console has a = combination action, so I <BR>haven't spent any time trying to do it in BB. I think Douglas Mc = Murray has <BR>had a go at it. <BR> <BR>Mick Berg. </FONT></HTML>   --part1_5b.e3e1f56.274b8bcd_boundary--