PipeChat Digest #1620 - Monday, October 16, 2000
 
Re: Service Playing vs. Public Performance
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Organ Recitals
  by <NAShepherd@aol.com>
PS! sponsorship...
  by "Stewart Strategies Group" <art@stewartgrp.com>
Re: Organ Recitals
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Service Playing vs. Public Performance
  by "Paul Soulek" <soulek@frontiernet.net>
RE: Service Playing/Church Membership
  by "Randy Terry" <randyterry@laumc.org>
Re: Service Playing/Church Membership
  by "Paul Soulek" <soulek@frontiernet.net>
New George Wright and Hazleton CDs
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
Re: Service Playing vs. Public Performance
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Pipes Spectacular in Little Rock (X-posted)
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
Bruce Cornely, where are you?
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: Service Playing vs. Public Performance
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Service Playing/Church Membership
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
an e-mail addy
  by <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
TEST
  by "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Re: Pipes Spectacular in Little Rock (X-posted)
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Service Playing vs. Public Performance From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Mon, 16 Oct 2000 22:30:36 +0800   DesertBob wrote   > . I don't know > what goes on "down under", nor was that supposed to be part of the = arguement. >   Well, Bob, that was my point exactly. You were generalizing.   > > Numbers are growing there, simply because they AREN'T growing in the = rich > countries.   The logic behind that statement escapes me     > However, > numbers are increasing perniciously in "happy-clappy/tilt-up/feel-good" > independent churches,   That is a statement that shows real prejudice. There are clappy happy denominations over here, most imported in the first place from the USA = which are flourishing. They are good honest Christian people who practise what they = preach - plain Christianity. I just can't stand their music.   > Not at all. BTW...wouldn't you be HAPPIER over on Organchat? You seem > so...EDGY...here. >   Bob, you snipped as drivel the only on-topic part of my reply. I stand by = what I said. I am quite happy here, thank you. End of subject. Bob E.      
(back) Subject: Organ Recitals From: <NAShepherd@aol.com> Date: Mon, 16 Oct 2000 11:38:59 EDT   Dear Colleagues,   Gloucester Cathedral is playing host this coming Saturday ( 21st October) = at 7.30pm to the Organist Titulaire of Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris, Phillipe Lefebvre. His programme includes   Fantaisie in A - Franck Resurrection (Symphonie- Passion) - Dupre Prelude et Fugue sur le nom d'alain - Durufle   and of course, an improvisation!   In an e-mail to me today, David Briggs, Organist at Gloucester said (and I =   quote)   "Lefebvre is, without doubt, one of the most brilliant improvisers in the world today, and the combination of his extraordinary genius and the tonal =   palette of the Gloucester organ promises to be very special indeed".   To receive such an accolade from David Briggs means that this guy is worth =   hearing!!   On to a totally different subject, I have recently launched a new (basic) website that contains details of forthcoming organ concerts and recitals = at Keynsham Parish Church where I am organist. Please have a look and don't forget to sign our guestbook!   http;//www.zyworld.com/stjohnchoir   Best wishes to all   Neil Neil Shepherd Director of Music, St John's Church, Keynsham St John's Music Office 6 Priory Road Keynsham Bristol BS31 2BX Telephone (Office) 0117-908-2567 Telephone (Home) 0117-986-1377 Mobile 07970 325046 Website: http://www.zyworld.com/stjohnchoir    
(back) Subject: PS! sponsorship... From: "Stewart Strategies Group" <art@stewartgrp.com> Date: Mon, 16 Oct 2000 14:35:26 -0400   Even though PS! is now over, this release -- which was distributed to = media on Thursday and Friday -- is sent FYI.   NEWS FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Art Stewart (617) 441-8834   American Bible Society Sponsors Nationwide Celebration of the Organ in = America   (October 12, 2000 -- New York, NY) The American Bible Society (ABS), an = international organization whose purpose is to make the Holy Scriptures = accessible and affordable worldwide, has committed to being a presenting = sponsor of this weekend's Pipes Spectacular! event produced by the = American Guild of Organists (AGO).   A unique celebration of the organ in America, Pipes Spectacular! -- The = World's Largest Organ Concert -- is designed to increase appreciation for = the enduring majesty of the "King of Instruments", and will involve over = 240 concert events across the country this Sunday, October 15th to reach a = potential family audience of 100,000.   Founded in 1816, the American Bible Society (http://www.americanbible.org) = is the world's largest Bible Society and part of a fellowship of over 135 = national Bible societies called The United Bible Societies. They work in = more than 200 countries or territories translating the Scriptures in = hundreds of languages for distribution worldwide. ABS works to make the = Scriptures accessible and affordable -- without doctrinal note or comment = -- by producing them in a variety of formats. Like the AGO, the Society = maintains a leadership role in the use of new media technologies for = communication and dissemination of its materials. It also works to raise = awareness of the need for Scriptures through programs that provide the = Bible to millions of people in the U.S. -- such as those in prisons and = hospitals as well as victims of natural disasters.   "Having the ABS on board as a nationwide presenting sponsor of the Pipes = Spectacular! event is an encouraging endorsement of the AGO's work in = advocating for the arts in our society, educational outreach -- = particularly to youth -- and sacred communication of all kinds," notes = James Thomashower, executive director of the American Guild of Organists. = "We hope this initial collaboration is the beginning of a = mutually-beneficial relationship in which we may explore and embark upon = joint ventures in the future. Our two organizations share a commitment to = education and service that exemplifies the expanding role non-profit = organizations are assuming as resources-at-large in today's dynamic global = marketplace."   - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -   The American Guild of Organists (http://www.agohq.org) is the national = professional association serving the organ and choral music fields, and is = the largest membership organization in the country dedicated to a single = instrument. Founded in 1896 as an educational and service organization, = the AGO seeks to set and maintain high musical standards and to promote = understanding and appreciation of all aspects of organ and choral music. = The AGO serves over 21,000 members in 343 chapters throughout the United = States and in Europe: organists and other keyboard players, choir and = music directors, conductors, composers, music educators, builders, = artisans and music aficionados engaged in the multi-dimensional world of = the pipe organ.   # # # #  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Recitals From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 16 Oct 2000 11:37:38   At 11:38 AM 10/16/2000 EDT, you wrote: >"Lefebvre is, without doubt, one of the most brilliant improvisers in the =   >world today, and the combination of his extraordinary genius and the = tonal >palette of the Gloucester organ promises to be very special = indeed".<snip>   Ah, the English and their organs. They are truly blessed.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Service Playing vs. Public Performance From: "Paul Soulek" <soulek@frontiernet.net> Date: Mon, 16 Oct 2000 16:14:43 -0500   Sure, some churches are on rapid decline, but nobody looked at the other end. I know quite a few churches in my area that are really growing, and they don't have contemporary worship. There are still many churches that are growing with traditional music programs. The fact that the numbers say that church membership is declining should be something that should move everyone to reach out more, not give up hope. Looks like I've got my job cut out for me!   Paul  
(back) Subject: RE: Service Playing/Church Membership From: "Randy Terry" <randyterry@laumc.org> Date: Mon, 16 Oct 2000 14:52:57 -0700   I don't think that all "traditional" churches are in decline, nor are all "contemporary" churches growing.   I do think that many "traditional" churches are including some aspects of current worship trends in their services. I often think about the organ's decline in interest. Our local AGO Chapter hosted its "Pipes Spectacular" concert yesterday. I'm sure the fact that Stanford University graciously hosted us and the three fabulous organs in Memorial Church are a draw. We had a varied program with organ/brass, organ, organ/voice. Everything = from early music on the charming single manual Fritts tracker, through Howells and Widor on the large 1901 Murray Harris romantic organ, to Bach, Buxtehude, and de Gringy on the monumental Fisk. A tenor sang Puccini, = and there were contemporary vocal solos by Pinkham and Terry.   The thing that was so surprising was we had an audience of 400, where = normal organ programs at MemChu range from 30-100. The program was anything but boreing. We didn't charge a penny, but sold ads and made over $1,000.00 = for the chapter. The playing was not perfect, but it was interesting. I was proud to have participated in the planning and playing, and glad (finally) that there is the AGO and I am an active member.   Organists have to bring excitement to their service playing if the organ = is to continue. If we cannot do this there is not a lot of hope for pipe or pipeLESS organs. I listen to organists at memorials and weddings. I hear = a constant parade of chestnuts played correctly but it is so obvious the performers (usually) are simply bored and would rather be elsewhere. We can't play Walther and Pachelbel et. al. and expect to keep the listerner engaged. I think improvisation is the key. You don't have to be fabulous to create a nice, interesting, piece of music that is fresh and relative = to the setting, and for sure isn't the dullness of "4th Sunday, Walther = Adagio from Concerto del Signr. Meck."   I am rambling but I hope my point is made - Improvisation along with = making sure we can at least "pretend" or "turn it on" or whatever, regardless of how we feel about our life, our current job, whatever, so that when people hear the organ they here something interesting, will go a long way to at least extend the day of extinction! If we are bored or unhappy with our jobs it WILL come through! (Unless we work hard to cover it up so we = don't shoot ourselves in the feet!)   Randy Terry          
(back) Subject: Re: Service Playing/Church Membership From: "Paul Soulek" <soulek@frontiernet.net> Date: Mon, 16 Oct 2000 18:06:41 -0500   Randy Terry wrote: > > I don't think that all "traditional" churches are in decline, nor are = all > "contemporary" churches growing.   Right- I was just talking about traditional worship because that is where the organ is used, and since we are on an organ list......   > I am rambling but I hope my point is made - Improvisation along with = making > sure we can at least "pretend" or "turn it on" or whatever, regardless = of > how we feel about our life, our current job, whatever, so that when = people > hear the organ they here something interesting, will go a long way to at > least extend the day of extinction! If we are bored or unhappy with our > jobs it WILL come through! (Unless we work hard to cover it up so we = don't > shoot ourselves in the feet!)   You hit the nail on the head! While organ music alone will probably not make a non-musical person leave a church (it shouldn't make a musical person leave either), it plays a big role. People leave because they are disgusted with existing worship practices, theology, beliefs, and people. We as musicians do play a role, and we should help all we can.   Paul  
(back) Subject: New George Wright and Hazleton CDs From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Mon, 16 Oct 2000 19:07:35 -0400   There are two new (!) CDs from George Wright ("A Tribute to Jesse = Crawford" and "Radio Days" launching a new series taken from his radio broadcasts), = a new Christmas CD from Tom Hazleton recorded at San Sylmar, a new CD of Reginal Foort playing his touring Moller (while it was still touring 1938-1940), and a magnificent 3-CD set of Quentin Maclean at The Regal Cinema, Marble Arch (recorded 1929-30 and fabulously restored). There is also a new CD from Bob Ralston, "Tulip Time," and one from John Ledwon, "Curtain Up." All are up on the OHS Catalog website, http://www.ohscatalog.org   Bill      
(back) Subject: Re: Service Playing vs. Public Performance From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Tue, 17 Oct 2000 07:55:51 +0800   Paul's picture of the churches is true for Australia too. Many have stayed with traditional music programs using organs, and are flourishing. There = are traditional churches in inner city areas which have languished and in some cases disappeared altogether; some of these are in areas which were once residential but are now given over to warehouse and factory areas. However there are many which have mushroomed up in new growth areas, traditional mainline churches. Remember that the population of Australia has nearly quadrupled in less than 50 years. The Royal School of Church Music has had = a big influence in many areas not only with choral singing but also with = organ music, and there are strong organ societies in most states.. There are many "family" churches with a pentecostal leaning. Their music = is the "clappy-happy" style and the music is accompanied by keyboard, electronic organs of the jazzy type, or a mixture of several instruments = (a "praise band" I have seen it called.). We can't write these groups off. = They often have large congregations. Paul Soulek wrote:   > Sure, some churches are on rapid decline, but nobody looked at the other > end. I know quite a few churches in my area that are really growing, and > they don't have contemporary worship. There are still many churches that > are growing with traditional music programs. The fact that the numbers > say that church membership is declining should be something that should > move everyone to reach out more, not give up hope. > Looks like I've got my job cut out for me! > > Paul >    
(back) Subject: Pipes Spectacular in Little Rock (X-posted) From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Mon, 16 Oct 2000 19:33:34 -0500   Greetings, everyone!   As several on both Lists have been reporting bits of their various PS events, I thought maybe you all would enjoy hearing of ours. As far as I know, the Central Arkansas Chapter AGO did something rather unique for our PS program -- and from what I saw of the reactions from the crowd (300 or so, at least, probably more!) everyone there enjoyed the event immensely. I think we did very good things for the image of the Pipe Organ.   Pulaski Heights United Methodist Church was the site of the event, on the Nichols and Simpson Organ (3/78) of 1998. (stoplist and organ info @ <www.nicholsandsimpson.com>) The arriving audience saw the organ console pushed out into "concert position", front and center of the chancel of the church. What *isn't* usually there was the large screen set up just = behind the console...but that would come into play a little later...<G>.   The program opened at 7 PM with a performance of the "Prelude in Classic Style" by Gordon Young, played by Beau Baldwin. What made this particularly important (and impressive!) to the audience is the fact that Beau is a 9th-grade 1st year organ student of James Maase, the Director of Music Ministries at PHUMC. Beau played very well, despite hints of nervousness at the size of the audience (and who wouldn't be a bit nervous in his situation?) and the audience responded with enthusiastic applause requiring Beau to return 3 times for bows. I can't help but think that some of the many other young people in the audience should have been impressed with this young man and his abilities at the console -- maybe a few of them might now have ideas about musicianship themselves -- and was this not one of the major points of the whole PS event in the first = place...??   Next on the program (after a slight bit of instrument relocation) was a piano/organ arrangement of the Saint-Saens "Danse Macabre", played by = James Maase at the grand piano and Phil Bordeleau at the organ console. Again, another exciting performance -- the two artists stayed perfectly together, and the instruments complemented each other (and the music) quite handily, providing a great variety of musical effects and nuances. Again, the audience responded most enthusiastically. This was truly *fun* music, and easy for the mostly non-AGO audience to appreciate and enjoy.   Phil Bordeleau, by the way, is the Organist/Choirmaster of the Cathedral = of St. Andrew (RC) here in Little Rock, and was now poised for the "main event" of the evening, where he would go on to show a side of his "musical personality" that *this* observer (at least) was unaware of. After a bit more furniture rearranging, the console was now off to the side (still in view of the audience, though) and the screen I mentioned before was about to come into usage.   We all were about to be treated to a showing of the original silent film "The Phantom of the Opera", accompanied by Phil improvising at the organ console. Bear in mind that the PHUMC organ is not in *any* way a Theatre Organ (not a single stoptab to be had!)...but by the conclusion of the film, those unaware of pipe organs in general might not have been able to make that distinction!! The lights dimmed dramatically...and Phil began with an Overture of several minutes' length...and then the screen = flickered to life. Without missing a beat, Phil launched into his accompaniment of the picture. It would prove to be "quite a ride" for us all!   Nearly two hours (!!) later, the words "The End" appeared on the screen...and I was able to start to realize what we had all actually just witnessed. Throughout the duration of the film, we heard what seemed to = be an endless variety of sounds and stop combinations from the organ (some quite unusual by "normal" standards, I'm sure!), and most importantly of all, Phil was able to truly bring the emotions of the film to life for us in the audience, in the finest tradition of the organ-accompanied silent film era. Throughout the duration of his improvisiational accompaniment, we heard bits and pieces of numerous classical organ works and popular tunes (including the Ubiquitous Bach dm -- guess where...!) and an = enormous amount of pure 'off-the-cuff' improvisation, all rendered in the most expressive, musical, and entertaining fashion. He used each of the many resources of the organ at some point or another -- everything from lush combinations of strings and vox purring softly to both chamade trumpets blazing away at top volume. Equally amazing to watch was Phil's mastery = of an unfamiliar (to him, anyway) console -- an observer watching him = punching pistons and grabbing drawknobs without ever missing a beat would certainly not have believed that he does not play this organ on a regular basis!   As soon as the words "The End" appeared on the screen, the audience = started to jump to their feet with loud and enthusiastic applause -- perhaps most (like myself) failed to remember that any proper silent-film accompaniment has to have music with which to watch credits roll by! By the end of the credits, when the lights came up and Phil closed with the classic = ascending "dah-dah-dah-DAA-a-a-a-a-h-h-HHH", we were all on our feet clapping and cheering wildly. Three "curtian calls" (as it were...), I think. This = was an experience for all of us that is rarely, if ever, to be had nowadays -- especially "in church". Certainly rare for those of us in Arkansas, where there is no longer any extant *real* Theatre Organ or Movie Palace. For *this* night anyway, we all got to pretend. (really and truly, the only thing conspicuously missing was the popcorn!)   I'll close this with a comment overheard from a non-AGO (but occasional organ recital attendee) audience member while leaving the church. I think the comment says it all...   ...."I wish more organ concerts were this much fun"...   How true. Let us all remember this into the future -- and we will be certain that our beloved instrument and its music will survive and prosper for our future generations to enjoy as well.   Cheers!   Tim Bovard Little Rock AR        
(back) Subject: Bruce Cornely, where are you? From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Mon, 16 Oct 2000 19:39:56 -0500   Sorry, but I'm having trouble getting mail to Bruce - nothing is working. If you are out there, please reply. I apologize - please play through.   Thanks,   Glenda Sutton        
(back) Subject: Re: Service Playing vs. Public Performance From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Mon, 16 Oct 2000 21:01:25 EDT   In a message dated 10/16/00 5:16:51 PM Eastern Daylight Time, soulek@frontiernet.net writes:   << The fact that the numbers say that church membership is declining should be something that should move everyone to reach out more, not give up hope. >>   A decline in church attendance might be a good thing. If the people who = are there for entertainment are getting bored, so much the better. Vital churches are those with small or large groups of committed Christians, = rather than hoardes of church-shoppers. In a former parish our rector said he didn't see why we continued with Evensong when the choir of 16 often outnumbered the congregation. I suggested that he attend and see for himself. He did and was amazed that the congregational singing of hymns = was equal to or better than the full Sunday morning service. Give me a few people who really want to worship over a large crowd of observers any day.   Bruce Cremona502@cs.com in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles visit the Cornely pack at Howling Acres: Ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Service Playing/Church Membership From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Mon, 16 Oct 2000 21:01:26 EDT   Thanks, Randy. Could you post the program?   Bruce Cremona502@cs.com in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles visit the Cornely pack at Howling Acres: Ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: an e-mail addy From: <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net> Date: Mon, 16 Oct 2000 22:57:44 -0400 (EDT)   Can someone please send me Scott Fopiano's e-mail addy privately? Sorry to do this x=3Dpost, but I'd really like to get in touch with him.   Thanks. Neil B    
(back) Subject: TEST From: "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Mon, 16 Oct 2000 22:37:32 -0500   Please excuse this posting....I checking to see if this will post this way   thanks,   Jon    
(back) Subject: Re: Pipes Spectacular in Little Rock (X-posted) From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Tue, 17 Oct 2000 00:34:55 EDT   Tim, Thanks for the review of what appears to have been a very successful PS. =   May we please see the rest of the programme??   I got a lump in my throat as you described the silent film performance, as = my grandmother and her sister were both theatre organists, unfortunately = barefly before my arrival on the music scene. Now, both of them and the = WurliTzers they played on are gone.   What an exciting event you were a part of. Congratulations.   Our PS did not fare so well, alas.   Below is my review:   Our Pipe Organ "Spectacular" was preceded by a performance of Bach's Clavierubung, played by Peter DeWitt. Sadly, I can't give a complete = review of this recital since I was unavoidably fifteen minutes late, and then = fell asleep during the "Ten Commandements"... about number 3, I think!   After a reception which followed the first recital, the Pipes Spectacular continued at 6pm. The program:   Messe des Pauvres ... Erik Satie Kyrie (sung by Willis Bodine Chorale) Dixit domine (soprano solo) Priere des Orgues Commune qui mundi nefas Chant Ecclesiastique Priere pour les voyageurs et les marins en danger de mort, a la tres bonne = et tres auguste Vierge Marie, mere de Jesus Priere pour le salut de mon ame (Willis Bodine, organist; Willis Bodine Chorale)   "Air" (From Suite #1 for Organ) ... Florence Price "Joie et Clarte des Corps glorieux" ... Olivier Messiaen (Miriam Zach, organist)   Cantata, Ich habe genug (BWV 82) ... J S Bach (Willis Bodine, organist; 2 violins, viola, cello, oboe, and baritone)   Toccata and Fugue in d-minor (BWV 565) ... J S Bach (LeRoy McKinney, organist)   Psalm 23 (first performance) ... Willis Bodine (LeRoy McKinney, organist; Willis Bodine, director; Willis Bodine Chorale)   Psalm 139 (from "Pilgrm Psalms") ... Ross Lee Finney     This program was far from spectacular in my book, either from a musical or =   organ standpoint. The Satie Mass was boring at best... a seeming = continuum of alternating major and minor chords, tedious rhythm, and very tiring nine-note "melodies" played and then echoed. I don't know why the piece = was divided into sections... it all sounded alike. The choir, for some = reason was seated in the first two rows of the auditorium (the organ is above the =   stage on the front wall), and sang with their back to the audience. I was =   sitting on the top row of the balcony (west end!) and could barely hear = them. The soprano solo was lovely but over all to quickly. The rest was = same-old same-old.   The "Air" by Florence Price was just that. A breath of fresh air. In her =   very lovely bluesy style this piece is luscious and tonally and = rhythmically engaging. Alas, it was played all on quiet celestes that disappeared = into the air-conditioning noise when the swell boxes were shut.   The Messiaen suffered from the anemia of the organ's reeds. When the = swell box is closed, only the mixtures are heard. As I listened to this I = thought of the old description of "swell reeds snarling to get out of the box" and =   got the impression that these were quite content inside. The organ (formerly Skinner) has been rebuilt by A-S and Moller, and has been gutted = of its exciting and fiery reeds. Although well played, the Messiaen was = hardly inspiring.   The Toccata and Fugue in d-minor probably had both Bach and Virgil Fox, = and probably Biggs, too, spinning in their graves. The new, and = silly-sounding quadruple mordents used on the opening statements gave image of a demented =   version of Fur Elise! The entire piece was played on uncoupled divisions =   which are very thin and unaggressive. Stock formula emotion was used throughout -- begin segment slowly and accellerate until end. It became = very tedious and predictable. This was definitely not spectacular.   The first performance of Willis Bodine's Psalm 23 certainly will not be = its last. This was, for me, the highlight of the program. Bodine's choral music is quite often simply exquisite. This is one of those times. A beautifully lush accompaniment with organ, flute and oboe plays back and forth with the choir, leading and imitating, and exploring various keys = and textures of word painting. This music ranks with the best of Sowerby and should be in everybody's library as soon as possible. The sound is very intricate, but Bodine's music is written in such a way that it only sounds =   difficult, when it is not; yet it is most often challenging not only to = learn but to perform. I highly recommend this piece, and hope to hear it again, =   and sing it, as well.   The conclusion of the Pipes Spectacular was unfortunately, unspectacular. =   Since this was not a church recital and the audience was about = fifty-percent students, congregational singing was not expected (or achieved!). Psalm = 139 by Ross Lee Finney moves back and forth from 2/2 to 3/2 and employs a not quite interesting melodic formula. The Bodine Chorale sang it along with = a full-ish organ accompaniment so they were barely heard. It was not = exciting and at its conclusion the audience just sat quietly, wondering what was = going to happen next. Following a stage direction, the audience then applauded =   the program.   The purpose of the Pipes Spectacular was to entice people into attending organ recitals and increasing their appreciation of the pipe organ. I = know I don't want to go to another program like this! I hope everyone had better luck than we did. You will also notice that the Widor Toccata was =   omitted from our program. Widor is probably much relieved!       Bruce Cremona502@cs.com in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles visit the Cornely pack at Howling Acres: Ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502