PipeChat Digest #1622 - Tuesday, October 17, 2000
 
Re: Service Playing
  by "Gray King" <gking1@bellsouth.net>
Hymn Playing
  by <toelz@cetlink.net>
AGO PENINSULA PROGRAM
  by "Randy Terry" <randyterry@laumc.org>
Re: Hymn Playing
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
RE: Hymn Playing
  by "Charles E. Brown" <chabrown@bellatlantic.net>
Re: Hymn Playing
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Herr Wagner in 'Church'
  by "M. Hackett" <mikehack@u.washington.edu>
RE: Hymn Playing
  by "Charles E. Brown" <chabrown@bellatlantic.net>
Re: Herr Wagner in 'Church'
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersv.edu>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Service Playing From: "Gray King" <gking1@bellsouth.net> Date: Tue, 17 Oct 2000 11:25:29 -0400   Dear List,   I never really post anything here, but I wanted to say that I am most = impressed with this post of service playing. People are real. They want to hear something they can identify with. Most churches are just not dealing with = a lot of high classics anymore. Once in a while is great.   I know of a man that is at a First Baptist Church here in NC. He has just completed 22 years and in two more years will retire. Now this man has no degree, although he took every course possible without graduating from = Moody Bible Institute, in the music department. He is real. He can improvise = all over the play, even on the classics.   Point is, the church is huge and always has been. I used to practice = there in high school on the Reuters Organ. (wonderful instrument). The city has = the largers open faced granite pit in the world, or at least it was. So, all = the major older buildings are made of granite. Man, you should hear and see = this church and organ.   They used to have starchy old and young organists in there that just about killed interest in the church. Then along came this fellow. It was like = new life in that church.   I myself am a lot like this. I make it real. I hope others will take the = same hint and help renew an interest in one of the most wonderful instruments = ever conceived....the organ.   Gray     Jim wrote:   > You have written precisely what one needs to do in order to continue to > serve God and to continue to play the church organ as it was intended. = We > dicussed this same attitude about 2 years ago. I still say if you are = going > to show off, do it for the postlude or when you are by yourself. That = way > you can pat your own back and turn other people off to the organ in = church. > > Jim H.    
(back) Subject: Hymn Playing From: <toelz@cetlink.net> Date: Tue, 17 Oct 2000 12:14:28 -0400   This is about hymn playing. The registration suggestions are given with generic stop names, and will have to be adjusted to fit each organ and worship space. Once again, these are just my opinions, written mainly for beginning organists, and I'm sure others have different ones.   The primary musical component of the worship service is the singing of congregational hymns and other service music. In our service, there are 4 hymns, a Gloria (most of the time), a Gradual Psalm, a Doxology, and a Sanctus. The purpose of the organ in these instances is to accompany the congregational singing. It is "congregational singing accompanied by organ," not "organ with congregational singing in the background." Of course, part of accompanying is leading, but you don't want to be a drill sergeant.   I play hymns exactly as they are written. I never vary the harmony, I never add progressions, I never add flourishes, and I don't modulate. I play them exactly as written, although I might transpose an especially = high hymn. (Here, to the Evangelical organists, I would add that if your tradition likes free-style hymn playing, you might be able to do it more effectively solo, perhaps during an Offertory.) I play the soprano, alto, and tenor parts on the manual, with the bass part on the pedals as = written. I always repeat each soprano and each bass note--I do not hold bass notes in the pedal. Sometimes I repeat either the alto or tenor or both, and sometimes I hold them. This depends on the hymn. Practice it various = ways for each hymn and see what works best for that hymn. If the congregation is dragging a hymn, I will repeat all notes (not choppy) to better lead them along. You should strive for a "detached legato" in hymn playing, keeping in mind that you are leading the hymn. You can't lead if your playing is mushy. Take a tape recorder with you and record your practice, then listen and learn. I have been playing for almost 30 years, and I still ocassionally record my playing and still learn by doing so. And now a word about nervousness--Get over it, for it will be reflected in your playing. Most people will sense, in your playing, nervousness and lack of confidence and will have no trust in your ability to lead them in singing. You can't lead if you're a bundle of nerves. If you practice and adequately prepare for the service, there is no reason to be nervous. = Yes, embarrasing moments will happen, but so what? I guarantee you the sun = will rise the next morning. I have known more than one organist who took a sedative before each service--that's a disgrace. Conquer your = nervousness.   Play with force and confidence. Your music should exude force, not = energy. And there is a difference--force is strength; energy is not necessarily strength. A gnat has a lot of energy, but not much strength. You don't want to tip-toe-through-the-tulips as you play, and you don't want a delicate touch. Press the keys down as if you were pressing them = purposely all the way to the floor. Be serious as you play. Let your fingers crawl stongly over the keys. Don't play with loose fingers. Don't tickle the keys. Don't lift your hands off the keyboard like Liberace, and as you change stops, don't handle them like they were hot. Don't play hesitantly--play as if you know where you are going. That will make a difference in how your music sounds.   I set the tempo for a hymn by singing it during practice and using the tempo that makes the hymn most comfortable to sing. I don't use the tempo that "sounds best" or what someone else thinks it "should be"--I use a tempo that makes the hymn easy to sing. You can only determine this by singing the hymn during practice. I also sing during the service along with the congregation--that is the only way I can tell if the tempo is right--and there is nothing wrong with singing, as the organist is to participate in worship also. (Here I might add that I participate fully = in worship, even to the point of leaving the console to take Communion before I begin the Communion music.) I think many organists have a tendency to play hymns too fast--the congregation doesn't want a breathing workout. But then again, you don't want every hymn to sound like a dirge. I think you just have to use common sense and listen, sing the hymns during practice, sing with the congregation, and choose a tempo that makes the hymn comfortable to sing. You must use your own judgement, but if you get repeated comments from parishioners that the hymns are too slow or too fast, don't brush them off--they may be right. Remember, you are there to serve their worship needs. You're not making a musical or organistic statement, you're worshipping.   I generally set a registration for a hymn and use it throughout that hymn. I also use the same registration for the introductory stanza. I may vary the registration from hymn to hymn, but I seldom vary within a hymn. As a general rule, I would use on the Great, the 8' Flute, the 4' Octave, and the Mixture. You can also use the 2' Flute (couple it from the Swell if necessary). In the pedal, I would use the 16' Subbass, plus Great to = Pedal 8', plus Swell to Pedal 8' if using the Swell 2' Flute. What this registration does is sound the bass line exactly as if it were played on the manual, with the exception that it is augmented by the 16' Subbass. = To me that produces a clearer sound in which all parts are heard better than does using a complete, independent pedal registration. Also, notice that the 4' is most prominent, with the Mixture second, and the base of 8' = Flute third, with the 2' Flute fourth. I think that gives a cleaner sound, and it is best to avoid a heavy, muddy sound in hymn playing so that the different parts can be heard clearly. Those who play organs that have a veiled sound may have difficulty getting a clear registration and having enough volume at the same time, but I would lean toward sacrificing volume for clarity. In a big hymn, you may want to add the 8' Principal and 4' Flute on the Great and delete the 8' Flute, but I use the 8' Principal sparingly in hymn playing. I would not use the 8' Principal and 8' Flute together unless I were playing a very unusual organ. If you have a Super Octave, you can use it some, too, but I would probably only use it if I used the 8' Principal. Sometimes in a big hymn, I would add a Pedal reed, but if you only have loud reeds on the Pedal, I think it is best to use it only on the last stanza. If you want a reed in the Pedal throughout and your 16' reed is not under expression, couple the Swell reed to the Pedal at 8' and adjust the shades if necessary. You could then add the loud 16' Pedal reed for only the last verse. For the Doxology, sometimes I use the basic registration plus the Swell reed and close the shades partly. For the Sequence hymn, especially it if is a meditative hymn, I would use on the Great, the 8' Flute, the 4' Octave, and couple the 2' Flute from the Swell with Swell to Great 8', with an ocassional Swell to Great 4', depending on the hymn and how well the organ is in tune. Or you could use the 2' and 1 1/3' Flutes on the Swell coupled to the Great at 8'. For the Gradual Psalm, Communion hymn and Sanctus, I like on the Swell the 8' Flute, 8' Gemshorn, 4' Flute and Swell 4' with pedal to balance (you may want to go with a 16' Bourdon plus Swell to Pedal 8' with an optional 4'), except that I do not use the pedals for the Gradual Psalm. In general, I think that the volume of the organ should be such that the organ is just audible above the congregation--if the congregation is just audible above the organ, you are too loud. No stop "has" to be used in hymn playing--if it is too loud, simply don't use it. And whatever you do, don't play louder just because it happens to be Easter, Pentecost, or Christ the = King. Another obtrusive thing that some organists do is to play the very last note in the stanza in the pedal part an octave lower, as if for some grand ending. For instance, if the last note should be D below middle-C, they play D an octave lower. That "sticks out" too much for me. We're not playing the sound-track of a movie where everything has to sound majestic and broad with a deep rich bass. Don't overdo anything on the organ.   Finally, practice the hymns. I know many organists who spend a lot of = time practicing preludes and postludes, but who spend little if any time practicing hymns. Practice the hymns and develop a smooth, leading style. Next installment--selection of music.    
(back) Subject: AGO PENINSULA PROGRAM From: "Randy Terry" <randyterry@laumc.org> Date: Tue, 17 Oct 2000 09:35:22 -0700     PROGRAM     Grand Choeur Dialogue Eugene Gigout (1844 - 1925)   Matthew Halonen, organ, with Royal Court Brass, Bryce Martens, director Doug Simon, trumpet Bryce Martens, trumpet Katie Sablinksy, French horn Ken Sablinksy, trombone Barry Guerrero, tuba   Murray Harris Organ (1901)     Prelude and Fugue in D Major, BWV 532 Johann Sebastian Bach   (1685-1750) Ronald McEntire, organ   Fisk-Nanney Organ (1984)     There is no Rose Randy Terry   (1962- ) Hymn to St. Cecilia Daniel Pinkham   (1923- ) Set me as a Seal (from "Wedding Cantata") Pinkham   Randy Terry, organ, with Melissa Glaister, soprano   Murray Harris Organ (1901)     Three Dialogues Nicolas de Grigny   (1672-1703) Sur le cromorne et cornet Sur les flutes Sur les grands jeux   Matthew Dirst, organ   Fisk-Nanney Organ (1984)     Master Tallis's Testament Herbert Howells   (1892-1983) Randy Wurschmidt, organ   Murray Harris Organ (1901)     Ballo del Granduca Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck   (1562-1621) Robert Huw Morgan, organ   Potter-Brinegar Organ (1995)     Prelude and Fugue in G minor Dietrich Buxtehude   (1637-1707) David Sheetz, organ   Fisk-Nanney Organ (1984)     Salve Regina Giacomo Puccini   (1858-1924)   Jill Mueller, organ, with Mark Adams, tenor   Murray Harris Organ (1901)     Symphonie VI Charles-Marie Widor   (1844-1937) first movement - Allegro   Angela Kraft Cross, organ   Murray Harris Organ (1901)     Trumpet Voluntary John Stanley   (1712-1786) Jill Mueller, organ, with Joyce Johnson-Hamilton, trumpet   Murray Harris Organ (1901)      
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn Playing From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Tue, 17 Oct 2000 12:54:38 -0400 (EDT)     >I play hymns exactly as they are written. I never vary the harmony, I >never add progressions, I never add flourishes, and I don't modulate. I >play them exactly as written, although I might transpose an especially = high >hymn. .... >I generally set a registration for a hymn and use it throughout that = hymn. >I also use the same registration for the introductory stanza. I may vary >the registration from hymn to hymn, but I seldom vary within a hymn.   Much of your post was right on, but this sounds pretty boring, not to say dismal. Hymn-playing, as you say, should communicate strength, but I = think a little joy would be welcome. I know it is with my congregation.   Randy Runyon organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati runyonr@muohio.edu author of DELIA WEBSTER AND THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD (University Press of Kentucky, 1996) Now available in paperback--check it out at Amazon.com!      
(back) Subject: RE: Hymn Playing From: "Charles E. Brown" <chabrown@bellatlantic.net> Date: Tue, 17 Oct 2000 13:33:57 -0400   Randy:   You beat me to the punch and stated my sentiments exactly. I cannot = imagine anything as boring as playing hymns in this fashion.   First of all, in many instances, the different verses of the poetry = require different moods. Playing hymns "straight" shows an insensitivity to the text.   Secondly, I feel the techniques of free accompaniment and modulation helps elevate the congregational singing and mood. Just last Sunday we did a = hymn and when I did a modulatory interlude before the last verse, the congregational singing went right through the roof!   Hymns must be played with excitement a feeling as well as strength.   Charles     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Randolph Runyon Sent: Tuesday, October 17, 2000 12:55 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Hymn Playing       >I play hymns exactly as they are written. I never vary the harmony, I >never add progressions, I never add flourishes, and I don't modulate. I >play them exactly as written, although I might transpose an especially = high >hymn. .... >I generally set a registration for a hymn and use it throughout that = hymn. >I also use the same registration for the introductory stanza. I may vary >the registration from hymn to hymn, but I seldom vary within a hymn.   Much of your post was right on, but this sounds pretty boring, not to say dismal. Hymn-playing, as you say, should communicate strength, but I = think a little joy would be welcome. I know it is with my congregation.   Randy Runyon organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati runyonr@muohio.edu author of DELIA WEBSTER AND THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD (University Press of Kentucky, 1996) Now available in paperback--check it out at Amazon.com!       "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn Playing From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 17 Oct 2000 10:44:43 -0700   Traditions differ from church to church ... at one end, there is a LONG tradition of reharmonizing, modulating, improvising, etc. in the = evangelical churches that sing Gospel hymns; at the other end, there is an even LONGER tradition of reharmonizing, modulating, improvising, descants, etc. in the Anglican churches.   True, a BEGINNING organist should stick to the printed page and strict note-values, voice-leading, etc., but he/she should get a copy of One = Hundred Free Harmonizations and Fifty Free Harmonizations by T. Tertius Noble (the = basic old Anglican books) and a selection of the other free harmonization and = descant books and begin to learn the STYLES.   In our service, improvisations between verses are often NECESSARY if a procession, Holy Communion, etc. isn't finished; if we're singing a = rousing hymn, particularly for the Recessional, my people would ask me if I'm = feeling OK if I DIDN'T modulate and reharmonize the last verse (grin).   ALL of this can be OVERdone, of course ... probably one verse of one hymn = per service is about average. I don't INVARIABLY modulate and play a free harmonization on the last verse of the Processional and Recessional hymns; = I DO change registrations once or twice in the course of most hymns.   Cheers,   Bud   "Charles E. Brown" wrote:   > Randy: > > You beat me to the punch and stated my sentiments exactly. I cannot = imagine > anything as boring as playing hymns in this fashion. > > First of all, in many instances, the different verses of the poetry = require > different moods. Playing hymns "straight" shows an insensitivity to the > text. > > Secondly, I feel the techniques of free accompaniment and modulation = helps > elevate the congregational singing and mood. Just last Sunday we did a = hymn > and when I did a modulatory interlude before the last verse, the > congregational singing went right through the roof! > > Hymns must be played with excitement a feeling as well as strength. > > Charles > > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of > Randolph Runyon > Sent: Tuesday, October 17, 2000 12:55 PM > To: PipeChat > Subject: Re: Hymn Playing > > >I play hymns exactly as they are written. I never vary the harmony, I > >never add progressions, I never add flourishes, and I don't modulate. = I > >play them exactly as written, although I might transpose an especially = high > >hymn. > ... > >I generally set a registration for a hymn and use it throughout that = hymn. > >I also use the same registration for the introductory stanza. I may = vary > >the registration from hymn to hymn, but I seldom vary within a hymn. > > Much of your post was right on, but this sounds pretty boring, not to = say > dismal. Hymn-playing, as you say, should communicate strength, but I = think > a little joy would be welcome. I know it is with my congregation. > > Randy Runyon > organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati > runyonr@muohio.edu > author of DELIA WEBSTER AND THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD > (University Press of Kentucky, 1996) > Now available in paperback--check it out at Amazon.com! > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Herr Wagner in 'Church' From: "M. Hackett" <mikehack@u.washington.edu> Date: Tue, 17 Oct 2000 11:39:25 -0700 (PDT)     Richard Wagner, although famous for writing 'the music of the future' (DE noun omitted) -- and not a religious composer as such (somehow he technically died a Buddhist, or had nominally been in that direction for years) -- wrote a huge amount of religious music.   Considering that (like classical music) 90% of church music is bad enough to drive people away -- the lack of Wagner being performed in churches is a puzzle -- as his 'religious music' superceeds in quality so much of his contemporaries ... and most 20th century compositions.   I do admit that very few non-Roman churches have philosophical grounds to play this 'music of the future' -- as the US has such a tradition of 'fire and brimstone' service content.   Which reminds me -- who is going to bring back the midaevil / renaissance 'song contest', lyres only!   > A decline in church attendance might be a good thing. If the people = who are > there for entertainment are getting bored, so much the better. Vital > churches are those with small or large groups of committed Christians, = rather > than hoards of church-shoppers. In a former parish our rector said he > didn't see why we continued with Evensong when the choir of 16 often > outnumbered the congregation. I suggested that he attend and see for > himself. He did and was amazed that the congregational singing of = hymns was > equal to or better than the full Sunday morning service. Give me a = few > people who really want to worship over a large crowd of observers any = day.                
(back) Subject: RE: Hymn Playing From: "Charles E. Brown" <chabrown@bellatlantic.net> Date: Tue, 17 Oct 2000 14:38:39 -0400   let me add to what Bud said. There are several good courses, available through the AGO website, on hymn improvisation. I know they have stuff by Gerre Hancock and Paul Manz. Well worth a listen and practice!   Charles   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of quilisma@socal.rr.com Sent: Tuesday, October 17, 2000 1:45 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Hymn Playing     Traditions differ from church to church ... at one end, there is a LONG tradition of reharmonizing, modulating, improvising, etc. in the = evangelical churches that sing Gospel hymns; at the other end, there is an even LONGER tradition of reharmonizing, modulating, improvising, descants, etc. in the Anglican churches.   True, a BEGINNING organist should stick to the printed page and strict note-values, voice-leading, etc., but he/she should get a copy of One Hundred Free Harmonizations and Fifty Free Harmonizations by T. Tertius Noble (the basic old Anglican books) and a selection of the other free harmonization and descant books and begin to learn the STYLES.   In our service, improvisations between verses are often NECESSARY if a procession, Holy Communion, etc. isn't finished; if we're singing a = rousing hymn, particularly for the Recessional, my people would ask me if I'm feeling OK if I DIDN'T modulate and reharmonize the last verse (grin).   ALL of this can be OVERdone, of course ... probably one verse of one hymn per service is about average. I don't INVARIABLY modulate and play a free harmonization on the last verse of the Processional and Recessional hymns; = I DO change registrations once or twice in the course of most hymns.   Cheers,   Bud   "Charles E. Brown" wrote:   > Randy: > > You beat me to the punch and stated my sentiments exactly. I cannot imagine > anything as boring as playing hymns in this fashion. > > First of all, in many instances, the different verses of the poetry require > different moods. Playing hymns "straight" shows an insensitivity to the > text. > > Secondly, I feel the techniques of free accompaniment and modulation = helps > elevate the congregational singing and mood. Just last Sunday we did a hymn > and when I did a modulatory interlude before the last verse, the > congregational singing went right through the roof! > > Hymns must be played with excitement a feeling as well as strength. > > Charles > > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of > Randolph Runyon > Sent: Tuesday, October 17, 2000 12:55 PM > To: PipeChat > Subject: Re: Hymn Playing > > >I play hymns exactly as they are written. I never vary the harmony, I > >never add progressions, I never add flourishes, and I don't modulate. = I > >play them exactly as written, although I might transpose an especially high > >hymn. > ... > >I generally set a registration for a hymn and use it throughout that hymn. > >I also use the same registration for the introductory stanza. I may = vary > >the registration from hymn to hymn, but I seldom vary within a hymn. > > Much of your post was right on, but this sounds pretty boring, not to = say > dismal. Hymn-playing, as you say, should communicate strength, but I think > a little joy would be welcome. I know it is with my congregation. > > Randy Runyon > organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati > runyonr@muohio.edu > author of DELIA WEBSTER AND THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD > (University Press of Kentucky, 1996) > Now available in paperback--check it out at Amazon.com! > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: Re: Herr Wagner in 'Church' From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersv.edu> Date: Tue, 17 Oct 2000 15:10:52 -0400       > From: "M. Hackett" <mikehack@u.washington.edu> > Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Tue, 17 Oct 2000 11:39:25 -0700 (PDT) > To: Cremona502@cs.com > Cc: pipechat@pipechat.org > Subject: Herr Wagner in 'Church' > > > Richard Wagner, although famous for writing 'the music of the future' = [snip] wrote a huge amount of religious music. > > Considering that (like classical music) 90% of church music is bad = enough > to drive people away -- the lack of Wagner being performed in churches = is > a puzzle -- as his 'religious music' superceeds in quality so much of = his > contemporaries ... and most 20th century compositions. > Look at _The New English Hymnal_, 1986, No. 290: "Holy God, We Show Forth Her" with the tune name "Meistersinger." The music is the chorale = at the opening of _Der Meistersinger von Nurnberg_, choral parts only, and = the text is the work of England's Peacy Dearmer.   I have taken a vocal score of _Meistersinger_, blanked out the words, photocopies the pages and typed in Dearmer's words instead, and sung the = two stanzas as a choir anthem at communion, #1 simply as a chorale, #2 with Wagner's orchestral interludes in the manner of a Bach "extended chorale" = of the type we know so well in "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring." Just enough folks in my congregation know enough about music to perhaps sense the music's provenance, so I explained it in the bulletin. .   Go for it!   Cordially,   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA