PipeChat Digest #1594 - Monday, September 4, 2000
 
Labour Day PipeChat IRC
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca>
Re: Boston OHS 2000, The Final Great Day
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: Boston OHS 2000, The Final Great Day
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Austin
  by <OrganMD@aol.com>
Re: Boston OHS 2000, The Final Great Day
  by "Cheryl C Hart" <info@copemanhart.co.uk>
Re: Boston OHS 2000, The Final Great Day
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
pump for the wind is fleeting (motto of the Former Pipe Organ Pumpers'  G
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Update
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Boston OHS 2000, The Final Great Day
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Boston OHS 2000, The Final Great Day
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Boston OHS 2000, The Final Great Day
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
 


(back) Subject: Labour Day PipeChat IRC From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Date: Mon, 4 Sep 2000 10:10:41 -0400   HI, Pipechatters,   Although it is Labour Day in both Canada and the USA, it doesn't mean that we shall be away from our computers this evening for our regular PipeChat IRC, held every Monday and Friday, come what may!   If you have not joined us in the past, go to the PipeChat-L Web page for = the easy to follow guide as to how to join in:   http://www.pipechat.org/   We hope to see you there, both regulars and newbies!   Happy Labour Day, - I hope that it will keep dry for the fireworks over = Lake Ontario, here in Kingston, Ontario.   Bob Conway    
(back) Subject: Re: Boston OHS 2000, The Final Great Day From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Mon, 04 Sep 2000 09:37:58 -0500   ManderUSA@aol.com wrote:   > This day began with a lecture which I did not hear. It will have confir= med > that Boston has consistently been a center of organ pedagogy and apprec= iation > for at least a century and a half. The title of the lecture was "Organ > Pedagogy in Boston 1850-1900," and included a discussion of the > personalities, the publications, and institutions of the period.   The title was perhaps a little off-putting, but this was really a very interesting talk. It was fascinating to discover the extent and modus operandi of nineteenth-century organists in Boston, and the speaker -- who is persuing a Ph.D. on the subject at Duke -- was extremely knowledgeable.     To attend a > Friday noon recital at Trinity, Copley Square, is to learn that this or= gan > culture remains very much alive today.=20   This really is one of the great Skinner organs around, and though its layout makes it a little difficult to manage and it is far from being untouched, I found it much more fascinating and attractive than the other Skinners we heard at the convention. Part of the allure is the contrasts -- a rich E. M. Skinner English Horn at the west end, a more piquant Aeolian-Skinner one in the chancel, contrasting Fl=FBtes Celeste -- where else could one find such things? Someone was commenting to me how much this organ captivated and influenced Louis Vierne when he played it. We have to thank this instrument, for example, for the stops such as French Horn specified in Vierne's Sixth Symphony.       Anyway, then onward to the > Chapel at Wellesley College. >=20 > I had played, heard, and even pumped this instrument. When I say played= , it > dignifies too much what I actually did do, as the complications of the > keyboard require quite a bit of time and understanding. =20   It would be interesting to know how John Stanley used the quartertones on his organ at the Temple Church. He certainly composed some pieces in F minor, which would have required some very deft sorting out of sharps and flats. It is my impression that most performers on the Wellesley instrument tend to play stuff in keys with only one or two sharps and flats, and one can well understand why! I was more taken with the beautifully flexible winding and the temperament of the instrument, than with the voicing, which while "authentic" is perhaps a little primitive for my conservative ears <g> =20 a choral prelude by Franz Tunder > (1614-1667), "Jesus Christus, Unser Heiland, der von uns . . . " served= in > alternation to our singing of the choral in or with various harmonizati= ons. > We had three choral harmonizations on two pages, and somehow the whole = effort > got somewhat complicated, and was not totally satisfactory.=20   That must be the understatement of the century! Most of us got utterly confused by the different versions and did not have the slightest idea what we were supposed to be doing when. Part of the confusion, I think, is that some of us thought we had had a playover and some of us thought there wasn't a playover at the beginning, so then we didn't know which verse we were on.   > Our last concert of the convention took us back to Immaculate Conceptio= n   That was one of the highlights for me too, and for my wife who was happily able to join me in time for it. It is also good that in Fr. Carroll the church now has a pastor who appreciates the organ, and an excellent new titulaire in Krista Rakisch.   Thanks, Malcolm, for a very interesting account.   John Speller St. Louis, Mo. > where, before an enormous audience of conventioneers, AGO members, and = Boston > music lovers, Thomas Murray gave us one final fabulous musical memory. = We had > learned to love this organ on opening night, and as I studied the print= ed > program, I found myself thinking about how much I would love to hear ea= ch > listed piece played on it. The whole program was a procession of deligh= ts, > all played in the elegant Tom Murray manner and wonderfully registered = with > great care. This was a program without anything but Organ music - no > gimmicks, no transcription, just good solid stuff from the Organ repert= oire. > That is not to be construed as a negative comment about transcriptions = or the > occasional lollypop piece, but this was an evening in which the perform= er, > the chosen music, and the instrument could hold us completely at attent= ion > throughout, with nothing else needed. Here is the program: >=20 > Guilmant - Sonata IV in D Minor > Allegro assai > Andante > Menuetto > Finale (Adagio-Allegro vivace con fuoco) >=20 > Reger - Benedictus > A note followed this in the program asking that applause be withhe= ld at > this point. Silence might well have happened on its own, given the int= ense > mood this piece can create. >=20 > Schumann - Three Studies for Pedal-Piano - Not too fast, C Major; With > earnest expression, A Minor; Andantino, E Major. >=20 > Bonnet - Matin Provencale (No. 2 from "Poemes d'Automne" - 1908) >=20 > After intermission: >=20 > Franck - Fantasy in A Major > Again another "hold applause" note, not to break the contemplative m= ood > before we sang a rousing hymn, "Praise the Lord, ye heavens adore him" = to a > grand Victorian tune called Faben, composed by the first organist of > Immaculate Conception Parish, who served until his death in 1875 - John= Henry > Wilcox. >=20 > Finding and choosing a hymn by someone connected with the parish was a = lovely > stroke, but there was something more about this tune. In Denver two sum= mers > ago, Tom asked us to sing the Vaughan Williams tune Down Ampney, follo= wed > immediately by a Rheinberger Sonata which began with precisely the same= first > six notes as those of the hymn tune, with only a slight rhythmic differ= ence. > I thought this year there was a connection between Faben and the next p= iece > on the program, and felt reenforced in that when Paul Marchesano came u= p to > me and commented on the same thing. I did not have a chance to query To= m, but > of course we are correct!! >=20 > Next, three more of the Schumann Studies, Intimately, A flat; Not too f= ast, B > Minor; and Adagio, B Major. >=20 > Finally, the Mulet Carillon-Sortie. >=20 > And sortie we did, back to the exhibit hall cum bar, for a last social = time > with friends from far and near. >=20 > What a wonderful convention! I heard 27 concerts in the seven days plus= one > evening! There were more than that, but I reluctantly missed a few. Sa= dly, I > also had to miss six lectures, an important feature of all OHS conventi= ons. > In my small way, by my attendance, I showed my firm support for the wor= k of > the Society by attending the Annual Meeting on the Sunday morning. I sa= w > countless good friends, and made quite a few new friends. It was also f= un > getting to know Boston a bit better. I hope these little scribblings mi= ght > help some readers to consider making plans now to attend next summer in= North > Carolina, from June 21st to the 28th. >=20 > Some questions I have raised in some of my postings about this conventi= on > have been graciously answered by members of the Lists. In a kind of wra= p-up > posting, I hope to make some of the really interesting information I ha= ve > received available to all. >=20 > Cheers, >=20 > Malcolm Wechsler > www.mander-organs.com >=20 >=20 >=20 >=20 >=20 >=20 > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Boston OHS 2000, The Final Great Day From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 04 Sep 2000 09:14:53   At 09:37 AM 9/4/2000 -0500, you wrote: >It would be interesting to know how John Stanley used the quartertones >on his organ at the Temple Church. He certainly composed some pieces in >F minor, which would have required some very deft sorting out of sharps >and flats.<snip>   Stanley did what he had to to cope with the inadequacies of the instrumen= ts of the time. This "Frisky=AE Air Calliope=99" might be great for the ver= y few that like to witness "authentic performances", but other than that, such instruments are a collosal waste of money.   >It is my impression that most performers on the Wellesley >instrument tend to play stuff in keys with only one or two sharps and >flats, and one can well understand why!<snip>   NO kidding! When one has to be particular about key signatures in order = to play on an instrument, it's time to toss the instrument, as far as I'm concerned.   >I was more taken with the >beautifully flexible winding and the temperament of the instrument<snip>   Take up the accordion...you'll LURRRRRRRV its "flexible wind"!   >...than >with the voicing, which while "authentic" is perhaps a little primitive >for my conservative ears<snip>   Primitive's a nice "PC" term for it. I consider such voicing to be barbaric and uncultured, and a quick, easy way to turn off the public to the organ!   I just got off the phone with a girlfriend from Boston that goes to Wellesley. I asked HER about the organ, since she's heard it on various occassions. She is not one of the dreaded "organ people", so her opinion actually matters, and she is a musical person, being a fairly accomplishe= d, but non-professional, 'cellist. Her response?   "Oh...you mean that giant squeezebox they put in there? What was so wron= g with the organ up front that they had to stick THAT thing in there? It sounds terrible!"   The public speaks. Case closed.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Austin From: <OrganMD@aol.com> Date: Mon, 4 Sep 2000 12:43:48 EDT   As a representative for Austin I can assure you that it is possible to dismantle an Austin Universal Windchest and move it! In the factory we generaly assemble the pipe bars (toe boards) complete with the action = parts installed. Then we build the "airbox" and set the complete action = assembly onto the airbox. Hence it can be removed the same way in reverse. The "relay" assembly is as a rule no more difficult to handle than any chest = of like size.   I hope that this helps you.   Bill Hesterman  
(back) Subject: Re: Boston OHS 2000, The Final Great Day From: "Cheryl C Hart" <info@copemanhart.co.uk> Date: Mon, 04 Sep 2000 18:43:50 +0100     >Reger - Benedictus > A note followed this in the program asking that applause be = withheld at >this point. Silence might well have happened on its own, given the = intense >mood this piece can create.   Just thinking about this piece sends shivers of bliss down my spine.   Thank you Malcolm, for the vicarious pleasure (excluding Montezuma's revenge) of this convention, through your always most eloquent scene = settings.   Cheryl       http://www.copemanhart.co.uk   Copeman Hart & Company Ltd Church Organ Builders ENGLAND   Registered in England No 696548    
(back) Subject: Re: Boston OHS 2000, The Final Great Day From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 4 Sep 2000 14:04:46 EDT   Hi Bob:   I just got sucked into this one, and I couldn't leave it alone. I couldn't =   agree with you more about the cost of these "throwback" instruments. As for *authentic* performance 14 or fifteen keys per octave to be able to play = in meantone is a bit *mean* itself. To fill out the plenariness one I suppose must used *authentic* ancient fingerings too I suppose. I find it an = exercise in futility. I guess my question is, Why do people do these things to themselves in the first place? I guess my *other* question has to do with hand pumping, why is that superior to blower blown? It's also interesting = that the word *flexable* stands in for unsteady wind. Another question, why is having to play using 2 1/2 assistants *superior* to a good relyable 100 memory combo action? You're Boston friend is right. Organ building has progressed much apace since the 16th and 17th centuries, and what has been proven by this backlash? Foppish silliness comes to mind. No = flames please, just delete, and I don't mean you Bob!   Regards,   Ron  
(back) Subject: pump for the wind is fleeting (motto of the Former Pipe Organ Pumpers' Guild) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 04 Sep 2000 11:42:36 -0700       RonSeverin@aol.com wrote:   > Hi Bob: > > I guess my *other* question has to do with > hand pumping, why is that superior to blower blown? It's also = interesting that > the word *flexable* stands in for unsteady wind.   Nope. I've restored a Koehnken & Grimm's feeders and had a chance to = compare the hand-raised wind with the turbine-raised wind. It's hard to describe the difference (others have done so better in technical terms). The wind is = STEADY; yet the organ seems to SING when it's hand-pumped. I THINK it has to do = with the turbine keeping a higher STATIC pressure in the reservoir, whereas the hand-pumping allows the static pressure to rise and fall naturally with = the number of stops drawn and the size of the chords, number of bass pedals used, = etc., WITHOUT (I hasten to add) producing any of the characteristics of UNSTEADY = or INADEQUATE wind. It also had something of an effect on the KEY action, = since the amount of pressure the pallets had to open against varied somewhat.   I'm not advocating a wholesale return to hand-pumped organs ... with the = number of services we have to play and the amount of practice time we've become = accustomed to, it simply isn't practical. But it IS worth doing, if for no other = reason than the power always seems to go off in Newport Beach JUST as we're starting a = service (grin).   My! those old bellows-boys must have earned their nickels at RC funerals = in the old days ... imagine pumping the organ through ALL the verses of the "Dies = irae" (grin)! I started on a foot-pumped reed organ ... my ankles used to give = out about half-way through the Credo (grin).   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: Update From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Mon, 4 Sep 2000 14:55:18 EDT   In a message dated 9/4/00 12:57:53 AM Eastern Daylight Time, desertbob@rglobal.net writes:   << Tall words, coming from the Master of the BaWLd-One Fun Machine! BWAAAAHAHAHAHAHA! >>   All right you! Enough is enough!   Bourdons at sunrise!!!!   BBBBBBBBWWWWWAAAAAAAAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA   Bruce Cremona502@cs.com in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles visit the Cornely pack at Holwling Acres: Ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Boston OHS 2000, The Final Great Day From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Mon, 4 Sep 2000 14:55:20 EDT   In a message dated 9/4/00 10:43:49 AM Eastern Daylight Time, jlspeller@stlnet.com writes:   << (Wechsler)> I had played, heard, and even pumped this instrument. When = I say played, it dignifies too much what I actually did do, as the complications of the keyboard require quite a bit of time and = understanding. >> << (Speller) It would be interesting to know how John Stanley used the quartertones on his organ at the Temple Church. He certainly composed some pieces in F minor, which would have required some very deft sorting out of sharps and flats. It is my impression that most performers on the Wellesley instrument tend to play stuff in keys with only one or two sharps and flats, and one can well understand why! >>   Of course, no one will be surprised that I absolutely loved this organ! = It was one of the very few that I personally tried out. Drawing the 8 and = 4 Principals, I diddles through various keys, played chorale segements in various keys, and experiemented with the split keys. It was glorious fun. = If I ever have the opportunity to have an instrument at home, it will be = of this type. I have never had so much fun in such a short time!   Bruce Cremona502@cs.com in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles visit the Cornely pack at Holwling Acres: Ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Boston OHS 2000, The Final Great Day From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Mon, 4 Sep 2000 14:57:09 EDT   In a message dated 9/4/00 12:16:47 PM Eastern Daylight Time,=20 desertbob@rglobal.net writes:   << Stanley did what he had to to cope with the inadequacies of the instrumen= ts of the time. This "Frisky=C2=AE Air Calliope=E2=84=A2" might be great for=20= the very few that like to witness "authentic performances", but other than that, such instruments are a collosal waste of money. >>   BoOb...   We need to lock you in the room with one of these organs, not to be released= =20 until you are genuinely smiling. It WOULD happen. Unless, of course, you=20 don't REALLY play the organ!!!!   hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm.......=20   (ole f***) ;-) heeheehee   Bruce Cremona502@cs.com in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles visit the Cornely pack at Holwling Acres: Ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Boston OHS 2000, The Final Great Day From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Mon, 4 Sep 2000 15:16:39 EDT   In a message dated 9/4/00 2:05:35 PM Eastern Daylight Time, RonSeverin@aol.com writes: <<I couldn't agree with you more about the cost of these "throwback" instruments. As for *authentic* performance 14 or fifteen keys per octave to be able to play = in meantone is a bit *mean* itself. To fill out the plenariness one I suppose =   must used *authentic* ancient fingerings too I suppose. I find it an = exercise in futility. I guess my question is, Why do people do these things to themselves in the first place?>   Because it's beautiful and fun! It's not as though they would send the unused money to YOU, now is it? Do you want people to deprive you of = things that cause you joy and excitement simply because they don't understand = why? It was so much fun playing this organ, and was quite a relief to hear a different sound from the other organs at the convention. The highlight = for me was the Prelude & Fugue in G by Buxtehude, which we had heard in equal temperament before. Kimberly Hess, much to my dismay substituted = something else in her programme for some reason. Had she played it, we would have = had the unique fun of hearing the same piece in THREE different temperaments = on THREE different and unique organs. NOW THAT'S FUN!   > I guess my *other* question has to do with hand pumping, why is that superior to blower blown? >>   Well, if you'd get out a bit more and listen to, rather than complain = about, these wonderful instruments you'd be able to hear how gentle the sound is when produced by "soft" wind. It is a subtle, but very powerful = difference, and you are cheating yourself out of a wonderful experience.   <It's also interesting that the word *flexable* stands in for unsteady = wind. >   You are confusing *flexible* wind with unsteady wind. There IS a = difference. In addition, if flexible wind is misused by someone who doesn't know how = to handle it, of course it is not going to work well. Please! = Credit/blame where it is due!     <Another question, why is having to play using 2 1/2 assistants *superior* = to a good relyable 100 memory combo action? >   Well, gee! Why no tirades about people using page-turners and = stop-pullers in their recitals, even on organs equipped with space-age acoutrements! = Did it ever occur to you that it is FUN to pump a pipe organ. How many organists or builders in the "olde days" became interested in the organ because they pumped it as a child. Is it your desire to removal all fun =   and manual action from our world in the name of expediency or aimless technology? Shame on you!     <You're Boston friend is right.>   I beg to differ! Closed-mined leaps to mind!     < Organ building has progressed much apace since the 16th and 17th = centuries, and what has been proven by this backlash?   That all progress is NOT necessarily good!   <No flames please, just delete....>   Not so fast, Bub! Don't think for a second that your going to get away = with such a narrow and venomous post unchided! Now off to the desert with = you to eat cactus!   heeheeheehee   Regards, Ron "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org ----------------------- Headers -------------------------------- Return-Path: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Received: from rly-yc02.mx.aol.com (rly-yc02.mail.aol.com = [172.18.149.34]) by air-yc03.mail.aol.com (v75_b3.11) with ESMTP; Mon, 04 Sep 2000 14:05:35 =   -0400 Received: from pipechat.org (ns.blackiris.com [206.105.52.2]) by rly-yc02.mx.aol.com (v75_b3.9) with ESMTP; Mon, 04 Sep 2000 14:05:33 -0400 Received: from aol.com by pipechat.org with SMTP; Mon, 4 Sep 2000 = 13:05:16 -0500 From: RonSeverin@aol.com Message-ID: <c9.833548f.26e53e3e@aol.com> Date: Mon, 4 Sep 2000 14:04:46 EDT Subject: Re: Boston OHS 2000, The Final Great Day To: pipechat@pipechat.org MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit X-Mailer: AOL 5.0 for Windows sub 120 Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sender: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Precedence: Bulk List-Software: LetterRip Pro 3.0.7 by Fog City Software, Inc. List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >>     Bruce Cremona502@cs.com in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles visit the Cornely pack at Holwling Acres: Ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502