PipeChat Digest #1600N - Tuesday, September 19, 2000
 
Peterson motor
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Peterson motor
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: Peterson motor
  by "Luther Melby" <lmelby@prtel.com>
Re: Peterson motor
  by "Luther Melby" <lmelby@prtel.com>
Re: Peterson motor
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Felix Hell in Memphis
  by <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: Peterson motor
  by <gblack@mail.ocslink.com>
Small Stock Instruments
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
Re: Austins, etc.
  by "Jason Comet" <diaphone64@hotmail.com>
Re: Small Stock Instruments
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #1588 - 09/19/00
  by <LLWheels@aol.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #1588 - 09/19/00
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Wicks question
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Felix Hell in Memphis
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Austins, etc.
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Austin
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
RE: Small Stock Instruments
  by "Randy Terry" <randyterry@laumc.org>
Re: Moller Organs!
  by <support@opensystemsorgans.com>
Re: Wicks question
  by "Bob Kinner" <rkinner@one.net>
RE: consulting
  by "Randy Terry" <randyterry@laumc.org>
RE: EP vs. DE
  by "Randy Terry" <randyterry@laumc.org>
 


(back) Subject: Peterson motor From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 08:26:39 -0500   Hellloooo listers-   I'm in need of Petersons (Worth, Illinois) email address. I understand they make and sell an electric/electronic swell shade motor control. I've checked OSI and Klanns new catologues and they have none.   This is for a (new) remote console wire-in where a conventional pneumatic wiffle tree would be way to big for the small space alotted in = the free-standing pipe case.   Any Idee-ers?   Thanks, Rick      
(back) Subject: Re: Peterson motor From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 09:36:45 -0400   >Hellloooo listers- > > I'm in need of Petersons (Worth, Illinois) email address. I = understand >they make and sell an electric/electronic swell shade motor control. I've >checked OSI and Klanns new catologues and they have none. > > This is for a (new) remote console wire-in where a conventional >pneumatic wiffle tree would be way to big for the small space alotted in = the >free-standing pipe case. > > Any Idee-ers?   Check the Web site for EMUTEK. They use a real neat and small moter on each shade. Reasonable too.   John V      
(back) Subject: Re: Peterson motor From: "Luther Melby" <lmelby@prtel.com> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 09:10:08 -0500   Try http://www.petersonemp.com/products/index.html I've found them to be very good to deal with. Luther From: VEAGUE +ADw-dutchorgan+AEA-svs.net+AD4- Date: Tuesday, September 19, 2000 8:27 AM     +AD4-Hellloooo listers- +AD4- +AD4- I'm in need of Petersons (Worth, Illinois) email address. I = understand +AD4-they make and sell an electric/electronic swell shade motor control. = I've +AD4-checked OSI and Klanns new catologues and they have none. +AD4- +AD4- This is for a (new) remote console wire-in where a conventional +AD4-pneumatic wiffle tree would be way to big for the small space alotted = in the +AD4-free-standing pipe case. +AD4- +AD4- Any Idee-ers? +AD4- +AD4-Thanks, Rick +AD4- +AD4-    
(back) Subject: Re: Peterson motor From: "Luther Melby" <lmelby@prtel.com> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 09:34:46 -0500   From: Luther Melby +ADw-lmelby+AEA-prtel.com+AD4-     Opps, should have also included email,, email+AEA-petersonemp.com +AD4-Try http://www.petersonemp.com/products/index.html +AD4-I've found them to be very good to deal with. +AD4-Luther +AD4-From: VEAGUE +ADw-dutchorgan+AEA-svs.net+AD4- +AD4-Date: Tuesday, September 19, 2000 8:27 AM +AD4- +AD4- +AD4APg-Hellloooo listers- +AD4APg- +AD4APg- I'm in need of Petersons (Worth, Illinois) email address. I = understand +AD4APg-they make and sell an electric/electronic swell shade motor = control. I've +AD4APg-checked OSI and Klanns new catologues and they have none. +AD4-    
(back) Subject: Re: Peterson motor From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 10:14:20 -0500   Many thanks to Luther and Jon for their kind assistance.   Guten Tag+ACE-   Rick      
(back) Subject: Re: Felix Hell in Memphis From: <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 11:17:51 -0400 (EDT)   I hate to say I told you all, but... I told you all. :)   The only thing I worry about is whether Felix will get burnt out on organ playing. I hope not.   God's blessings on you, Felix, and we are blessed to be able to hear you.   Neil B    
(back) Subject: Re: Peterson motor From: <gblack@mail.ocslink.com> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 10:51:41 -0500 (CDT)   <pre> Hellloooo listers-   I'm in need of Petersons (Worth, Illinois) email address. I understand they make and sell an electric/electronic swell shade motor control. I've checked OSI and Klanns new catologues and they have none.   This is for a (new) remote console wire-in where a conventional pneumatic wiffle tree would be way to big for the small space alotted in the free-standing pipe case.   Any Idee-ers?   Thanks, Rick HI Rick, here is the address etc. hope this helps. 11601S. Mayfield Ave. Alsip Il. 60803-2476 phone 708-388-3311 fax 708-388-3367 Let me know how this works, i have been thinking of getting of these for my organ at home. YOU can get an 8 or 16 stage motor i think. Thanks, Gary         "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : <a href=3D"http://www.pipechat.org">http:// www.pipechat.org</a> List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org   </pre>      
(back) Subject: Small Stock Instruments From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 13:47:46 EDT   In a message dated 9/18/2000 3:57:00 AM Eastern Daylight Time, RonSeverin@aol.com writes:   << The challenge from this new quarter Eorgs, was not anticipated in time to gear up and challenge it, or join in. It went too fast, and builders deluded themselves into believing it was just an upstart cottage industry =   and would go away eventually. It didn't >>   Not all organbuilders failed to recognize the challenge. Glatter-Gotz was publishing the ISO journal, I think back in the 60s, and I recall reading = in one issue his fervent plea to organbuilders to follow his lead in devoting = a month or so each year to building small stock instruments, ten stops or = so, that could be slightly adapted to different surroundings by perhaps a = larger scale 4' Principal, or other simple adjustments, with the basic design remaining completely the same. He would stop work on all contracts in progress, having made clear to customers that there would be no work on = their instruments during the month of ?? Under him, Rieger did a number of these =   instruments, and I recall playing a very elegant example of one of these = in a church in Wayland, MA, west of Boston. It had 12 stops, 4, 4, & 4. (There = may have been extensions in the pedal.) The only other company I know that did =   anything like that was Casavant under Larry Phelps. They produced a number = of essentially stock small mechanical instruments, Great, Brustwerk and = Pedal. In recent years, I believe Gene Bedient has done this sort of thing. The closest we ever came to this was the building of the organ at Immanuel on = the Hill, Alexandria, VA, which is almost a duplicate of the instrument at Cranmore School in England. You can see both of these on the company = website. The rector of Alexandria (now kind of hiding out somewhere - long story) = saw the Cranmore organ while on sabbatical in England, and announced that he wanted the same thing for his church. He more-or-less got it, and in fact, =   saved a few dollars in the process, as the design work had already been = done. There are some tonal differences. I think the concept of small stock = organs is a great one, but the company does not share my enthusiasm for it.   So be it,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Austins, etc. From: "Jason Comet" <diaphone64@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 14:12:16 EDT   I just got home from practicing on a large III/54 Austin at First Pres of Watertown NY. It was installed in 1960-61 and is divided above the = choir's heads on both sides of the 12' chancel. There is a POWERFUL 16' Bombarde = at 16 and 8 on the pedals with 8 on the choir. It just sings with a pure french trumpet sound.   The only thing that was done to the organ when it was installed that was JUST reworked/revoiced this summer were the mixtures.   there was a Scharff III on the Swell, a Plein-Jeu IV on the Great. They switched the two around so the Plein-Jeu is in the Swell, and the Scharff = is on the Great. The Scharff is in Europe right now being voiced but will be =   installed before Xmas. When the organ was built, they prepared for one = rank on the CHoir and one stop on the Great. On the Great they installed a Fourniture IV from Holland and a 4' Rohr Schalmei on the CHoir. The Rohr Schalmei is being made by Laukhuff and will installed in November. They = are now in the process of installing a Peterson Multi-plexing system, a = hydrolic lift under the console pit to raise it up to move it out to the altar, and = a Peterson Master Stop Processer and the Peterson MIDI resource system and a =   Johannas MIDI sound module. Optical keyswitches and magnetic pedal contacts. This is the BEST instrument in the upper part of the state. = And there is a Hill Norman and Beard 4 manulal pipe organ in the Episcopal church three blocks away.   That Fourniture just added a whole new tone to the entire Principal = Chorus. They also turned the Choir shades around so they open down. The Choir and =   Swell shades were orignially opend upwards. That Choir is so much more present in the room now. The Erzahler and Erxahler Celeste are so much = more clearer and when used with the 16 and 4 couplers makes a GORGEOUS solo string.   So, don't diss an organ until you play it. This one was fabulous before = and it is even more fabulous now.   My church is going to have Austin build there new organ. I'm the organist =   and am serving as Consultant and have the final say in what there is in = the organ and the tonal scheme. I also had a say in the First Pres. scheme = when it was being reworked this past summer.   Jason Comet     >From: quilisma@socal.rr.com >Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >To: pipechat <pipechat@pipechat.org> >Subject: Austins, etc. >Date: Mon, 18 Sep 2000 20:41:34 -0700 > >I have no axe to grind with Austin ... I presided over a fine >three-manual Austin of 1928 in Old St. Mary's Church in Cincinnati for a >number of years ... it had the finest Great Trumpet, BAR NONE, of any >organ I've played. It also had a wonderful mellow 16' Trombone that >would fit under the massed 8's to give the Pedal a little more >definition than the ENORMOUS 16' Open Wood could supply. But the 16' >Open Wood had its uses too (grin). > >Ditto the big Austin we removed from Cincinnati Music Hall ... there is >a FINE 8' Bassoon in Old St. Mary's Choir organ that came out of Music >Hall, and some Choir Principal pipes. > >But ANY builder, good, bad, or indifferent is going to have to SHOW me >the mixture compositions and the pipe scales, etc. and explain to me >WHY and HOW they will work in a particular room. It's MY superannuated >derriere on the line if I say to my Vestry, "this is the organ for us" >and then it doesn't work out. I can't ASSURE that won't happen in ANY >case, but I can sure TRY. At least a couple of builders I've worked with >have been grateful that I took the interest. > >Cheers, > >Bud > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >   _________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com.   Share information about yourself, create your own public profile at http://profiles.msn.com.    
(back) Subject: Re: Small Stock Instruments From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 11:23:31 -0700   The 19th century builders did it, and the rural Northeast, South and = Midwest are still dotted with playable examples ... Hinners, Hook & Hastings, Estey, = Erben, Johnson, etc.   My quarrel with most contemporary attempts is that they're neo-baroque = positive organs ... not particularly suitable for Anglican or middle-of-the-road Protestant services, for the most part, except for Schoenstein's French = choir organs.   It's instructive to see what 19th century builders did with seven ranks:   SWELL - enclosed   8' Stopped Diapason 8' Salicional 4' Harmonic Flute Tremulant (affects Swell only)   GREAT - unenclosed   8' Open Diapason - facade 8' Dulciana (some had Melodia instead) 4' Octave   PEDAL   16' Bourdon   COUPLERS   Swell/Great 8-4 Swell/Pedal 8 Great/Pedal 8   Doesn't look like you could play much literature, does it?   WRONG!   First of all, there's that singing 8' Open Diapason on the Great ... can = be used as a solo stop or the basis of the ensemble.   The 4' Octave is different enough that it can also be played down an = octave as a solo stop.   Dulciana, 4' Octave and 4' Flute played down an octave yields fonds 16-8 = without being muddy. Add Swell to Great 4' for more brightness.   Couple the Swell 8-4 Flutes to the Great at 8-4. Leave the box closed. = When you need a secondary chorus, throw off the Great 8-4 principals and open the = box.   The Swell Salicional and 4' Harmonic Flute played down an octave yields a wonderful, rich 'cello sound.   The key, of course is the VOICING ... the scales are wide enough to = compensate for the typical acoustically-dead small church; the Pedal Bourdon is ALL fundamental, for the same reason. Why is this such a mystery today? We = have hundreds of examples extant; y'all heard a lot of them in Boston.   But most of all, each and every voice is BEAUTIFUL in its own right. = There's enough harmonic development that you CAN live without mutations and = mixtures.   The builder? ESTEY (!), turn-of-the-century.   This organ played EVERY SUNDAY without fail for nearly a hundred years, = until the very silly people replaced it with a TOTALLY-INADEQUATE second-hand 4-rank = unit organ, which can be heard to about the second pew. Sigh.   Cheers,   Bud        
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #1588 - 09/19/00 From: <LLWheels@aol.com> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 15:27:00 EDT   In a message dated 9/19/2000 4:01:57 AM Central Daylight Time, pipechat@pipechat.org writes:   << Bruce writes: The common link through all of these instruments is a richness and warmth unique to = Austin. A-S had a distinct sound, but lost it. Old Moller's as well, has a = distinct (even pleasant!) sound whcih they also lost. >>   I would question this statement about A-S and cite as an example the instrument at the Lutheran church in Pheonixville PA which is a late A-S which IMHO sounds very much A-S. I don't know that I have ever encountered = an old Moller with a <distinct (even pleasant!)> sound (I'd be happy for = someone to cite examples) so I will not comment on that.   My point (and I DO have one) is that you guys have let your brains float = off into sweet-memories-ville whilst neglecting the reality that organbuilding = is first and foremost a BUSINESS. Yea, yea, yea, all that stuff about = artistic integrity, tonal concepts and stuff -- I believe it too, given a nice = port and a fireplace, but when push comes to shove, it is the almighty dollar = that rules the organ world. A-S was never, repeat, never on firm financial = ground (see Charlie Callahan's books) and was a bankruptcy-waiting-to-happen from =   day one, always delivering more than they could afford and trying unsuccessfully to make it up on the next one, which they never did. Moller = -- and I am not an expert on Moller and don't have Charlie to quote here so I =   give you good solid gossip :) --lost some of it's sales-staff that could = keep it putting 3 organs-a-day on the loading dock, through attrition and defection, and was floundering for leadership. Rumor has it that it was = the so-called <Calvary Grand> that put the last nail in the coffin.   My point is; no matter how much we would like the demise of large organbuilding firms to represent a referrendum on our own particular taste = in organs, their demise was really due to extra-musical factors.   Still doubt it? Then explain the survival of Wicks which has never had a reputation for <sound> despite their claims over the years of being successors to X,Y, and Z, or the survival of Holtkamp (admittedly smaller) =   now going into it's third generation of Holtkamp and having a <sound> representing the polar opposite of Moller, Austin and most A-S.   I do not mean this argument to say in any way that I think sound is irrelevant, only to point out that we should not equate poor buisness decisions with poor tonal philosophy.   Larry L. Wheelock   Read my lips -- (censored by the list owner!)  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #1588 - 09/19/00 From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 12:39:34   At 03:27 PM 9/19/2000 EDT, you wrote: >I do not mean this argument to say in any way that I think sound is >irrelevant, only to point out that we should not equate poor buisness >decisions with poor tonal philosophy.<snip>   Yup...he's right. Add to this the notoriously flaky nature of the prime customers, churches, and you have a business nightmare. I wouldn't be in the building bizz for anything right now, especially seeing how small the potential market is getting.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Wicks question From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 13:05:30 -0700   Doesn't one of the factors in Wicks' longevity (over and above shrewd business acumen) have to do with their windchests being simpler and cheaper to build? And they're right up there with Austin and simple trackers in the "can't kill 'em" department, which counts for a LOT with churches that don't want to spend a lot of money on maintenance.   I played a Wicks from the '20s in an RC church when I was in college in the '60s that I'm SURE hadn't seen a service-man since the day it was put in. Not only did everything WORK -- the beast was STILL IN TUNE (grin). True, the flutes and tremulant gave a good Hammond imitation, but there it was ... played every Sunday for EIGHT Masses, and SIX daily Masses. Not a GREAT sound, to be sure, but adequate to accompany the choir (which was all an RC organ DID in 1920). As I recall, it was Diapason - Flute - Dulciana on the Great, and Flute - String - Celeste on the Swell, unified all over the place ... no reeds, of course.   I think they WOULD build pretty much what you wanted, IF you knew what to ask for, and were willing to PAY for it, which brings us back to the earlier argument about the necessity of organists being at least SOMEWHAT educated in the specifics of organ-building and design. I think they build their "house style" (hey, so does Holtkamp) for those who DON'T ask.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: Felix Hell in Memphis From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 16:06:50 EDT   In a message dated 9/19/00 11:18:46 AM Eastern Daylight Time, Innkawgneeto@webtv.net writes:   << The only thing I worry about is whether Felix will get burnt out on organ playing. I hope not. >>   Not as long as the big bucks keep rolling in!! Notice, too, he's not playing in church on Sunday morning.   Bruce Cremona502@cs.com in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles visit the Cornely pack at Howling Acres: Ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Austins, etc. From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 16:06:47 EDT   In a message dated 9/19/00 2:08:50 AM Eastern Daylight Time, tmbovard@arkansas.net writes:   << Education on the part of the "consumer" of the product we (as organbuilders) produce can ONLY serve to help *increase* the chances of lasting success of any given instrument. To think otherwise is simply ludicrous. >>   The neobaroque "fad" was the direct result of education, both of consumers =   and builders. Unfortunately, neither were educated enough and all of the =   research wasn't in when his "fad" took off. Education will neither = prevent or instigate "fad" building. It's just part of human nature. Some people =   are subject to fads and others are not. A good example is Holtkamp, who many people think started the "fad" of his unique building style which was =   much copied. For some, it was a fad; for Holtkamp it was the way he felt =   his organs would be best presented. Therein was the combination of education and inventiveness.   And I stand by my original statement: DeSeRtBoOb is full of poopoo! = Bless 'em. That's why we like him so much!! ;-)   Bruce Cremona502@cs.com in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles visit the Cornely pack at Howling Acres: Ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Austin From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 16:06:46 EDT   In a message dated 9/18/00 11:07:57 PM Eastern Daylight Time, = OrganMD@aol.com writes:   << As a representative of Austin Organs, Inc. I must jump in at this = point and say that I do not think that we need some outside person to ride us in = order to get artistic results. >>   My feeling about purchasing a pipe organ is that you go to a builder whose =   work you respect and let them build the organ. If things are not to your liking at completion, then work with them. It is a mistake to try and = work with a builder whose work you don't respect.   My advice to churches is to find five builders who do work that is = pleasing to you. Then get comparable specifications (not exact duplicates) from = each and then decide which builder can deliver an organ expediently, and at the =   most reasonable price (not cheapest) but most reasonable. The goal is to =   get the best organ you can as quickly as possible.   If builder A does wonderful work and builder B also does wonderful work, I =   would not advise a church to wait 5 or 10 years for builder A because of a =   large backlog. There are just too many excellent builders to choose from =   these days.   Bruce Cremona502@cs.com in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles visit the Cornely pack at Howling Acres: Ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: RE: Small Stock Instruments From: "Randy Terry" <randyterry@laumc.org> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 13:15:44 -0700   One must remember that Schoenstein has also reproduced a number of small 6-10 rank organs using the English stock model (from the late 1800's) as a starting point. I remember seeing one in TAO some time back   Great: 8' Diapason, 8' Lieblich Gedeckt (sw), 8' Dulciana (sw) 4' Principal, 4' Flute (sw ext) Swell: 8' Dulciana, 8' Unda Maris, 8' Lieblich Gedeckt, 4' Dulcet (ext), = 4' Flute (ext), 2-2/3' Nasard (ext) 8' Trumpet (double enclosed) Pedal 16' Bourdon (ext) other borrowed pedal stops, full couplers, etc.   Everything was enclosed except the low 12 of the Diapason. There was a switch that chose an alternative bass octave for the Diapason if desired = (?) The big Trumpet was double enclosed. 6 Ranks total. I could see a lot of organ variety out of six ranks here. Perfect for the English minded! The Dulciana was a soft Principal, and the others are pretty much standard. = I'm sure these instruments are not cheap, but if someone is looking for a = small workhorse instrument of Anglican inclination this bears looking into. = This ought to be doable by any number of our smaller shops if you can find someone interested in this sound!   Randy Terry   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of quilisma@socal.rr.com   My quarrel with most contemporary attempts is that they're neo-baroque positive organs ... not particularly suitable for Anglican or middle-of-the-road Protestant services, for the most part, except for Schoenstein's French choir organs.      
(back) Subject: Re: Moller Organs! From: <support@opensystemsorgans.com> Date: 19 Sep 2000 13:19:48 -0700   On Mon, 18 September 2000, Cremona502@cs.com wrote:   > most new organs of any action are too loud these days. The problem is = NOT > the action.   It's the organ committee members who made themselves deaf listening to = rock bands in the 60's.      
(back) Subject: Re: Wicks question From: "Bob Kinner" <rkinner@one.net> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 16:31:47 -0400   Bud,   I agree wholeheartedly. I've always felt that Wicks went the right way in following the "KISS" method - keep it simple, stupid! If properly built, those chests will last forever and and be easily serviced with a = screwdriver and a soldering iron. And they are a shoe-in for today's electronic keyers. I am now in the process of installing a previously-loved organ in my church and, as the first step in the process, replaced all of the EP action with EM. (The only concern the church expressed over the offer was "maintainance costs".)   To start a soapbox uproar, the only thing EP action has going for it nowadays is that it is "traditional" - and organ bulders love their traditions.   Bob -- Bob Kinner AA8FH rkinner@one.net "If at first you don't succeed, switch to power tools." Red Green      
(back) Subject: RE: consulting From: "Randy Terry" <randyterry@laumc.org> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 13:33:56 -0700       -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Jason Comet   My church is going to have Austin build there new organ. I'm the organist and am serving as Consultant and have the final say in what there is in = the organ and the tonal scheme. I also had a say in the First Pres. scheme = when it was being reworked this past summer. ****   Jason, good luck in your organ project at your church. Just a word or = two: always remember when you have the privelege to consult on changes and such that you are not the last person to play the instrument. Someone will = come along after.   I am working with my present church to make some changes in our organ - a Swain & Kates (San Francisco builder) from 1972. They built organs using supply house parts. The instrument we have is pretty nice. However, = there is a lot of unsuccesful unification. The mixture plays at four pitch = levels in 3 divisions. We are going to rewire the great Cymbal so that it plays = as an octave coupler of the base 1-1/3' mixture, rather than the screamy 2 octaves above base pitch. We are adding an Oboe, Viola Pomposa, and replacing our Quintadena with a new Rhorflute, along with just general = tonal finishing here and there. I would have liked to have a big solo flute, = and maybe a Clarinet rather than the Oboe, but I am doing what is basically = the next logical stop, rather than what I personally want. We have a nice 16, 8, 4 Trumpet, but our builder urged me to remember that I am leaving something for the next organist to deal with. We are going to end up with = a much more sophisticated sound, fill in some gaps (there are a lucious pair of Gemshorns, but no good true string stop to use with the choir) and get rid of a stop (Quintadena) that is not very useful in an Episcopal service and replace it with something more moderate (a Rhorflute) I will let you know how it turns out!   Randy Terry    
(back) Subject: RE: EP vs. DE From: "Randy Terry" <randyterry@laumc.org> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 13:37:34 -0700       I think I agree. Having played a number of newer instruments with DE action, they are reliable and offer relief from some of the early DE = valves. The chests can be made very compact, and are easy to service. Our 24 rank Dyer organ at Trinity Episcopal in Florence, AL was located in a space = about 9' square, and included 2 16' reeds and a big Bourdon.   Randy T