PipeChat Digest #1600P - Wednesday, September 20, 2000
 
Organ Reform Movement
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Wicks question
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
RE: understanding the organ
  by "Randy Terry" <randyterry@laumc.org>
Re: PCOrgan Instructions New Chapters Uploaded.
  by "Paul R. Swank" <prswank@bellatlantic.net>
Re: Wicks question(and Can't kill'm organs)
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Felix burning out? Hell No
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
Re: Small Stock Instruments
  by "Kenneth LaFleur" <lafleur@pivot.net>
Re: Austins, etc.
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
Re: Moller Organs!
  by "Douglas A Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com>
Re: Moller Organs!
  by "Douglas A Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com>
Re: Felix burning out? Hell No
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
Re: Wicks question(and Can't kill'm organs)
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
NATIONAL SHRINE ORG
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Wicks question(and Can't kill'm organs)
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Felix burning out? Hell No
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: consulting
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Small Stock Instruments
  by "Blaine Ricketts" <blaineri@home.com>
Re: consulting
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Dennis James - Seattle Paramount - Silent Films
  by <MUSCUR@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: Organ Reform Movement From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 13:44:04 -0700   The excesses of the neo-baroque business in the '60s was the result of not properly UNDERSTANDING the Organ Reform Movement's BASIC principles, which addressed encasement, placement and action, rather than specifics of = national schools of voicing, and/or the orchestral organs of England and America, = which had their own integrity and literature ... many were ruined by trying to = turn them into something they weren't (and COULDN'T be), rather that leaving = them alone to do what they COULD do. Fortunately, the best remaining ones are = now being recognized for what they are: period instruments like any other = period instruments.   Tracker action to slider chests is an ACTION ... nothing more, nothing = less. It can be applied (within reason) to ANY style of VOICING.   And let's not overlook the fact that 8'-less organs were CHEAPER to BUILD (grin).   The problem lies in our definition of "education" ... reading stoplists in = the Diapason and TAO does NOT constitute an education in organ-building ... DIGESTING the majority of organ-building literature in the English = language MIGHT, if one coupled it with going to hear every organ (good and bad) = within reach, but there is STILL the matter of the EAR ... one has to be able to discern what one is hearing ... and GOOD TASTE ... if we could figure out = how to teach THAT ... well ...   Cheers,   Bud       Cremona502@cs.com wrote:   > In a message dated 9/19/00 2:08:50 AM Eastern Daylight Time, > tmbovard@arkansas.net writes: > > << Education on the part of the "consumer" of the product we (as > organbuilders) produce can ONLY serve to help *increase* the chances of > lasting success of any given instrument. To think otherwise is simply > ludicrous. > >> > > The neobaroque "fad" was the direct result of education, both of = consumers > and builders. Unfortunately, neither were educated enough and all of = the > research wasn't in when his "fad" took off. Education will neither = prevent > or instigate "fad" building. It's just part of human nature. Some = people > are subject to fads and others are not. A good example is Holtkamp, = who > many people think started the "fad" of his unique building style which = was > much copied. For some, it was a fad; for Holtkamp it was the way he = felt > his organs would be best presented. Therein was the combination of > education and inventiveness. > > And I stand by my original statement: DeSeRtBoOb is full of poopoo! = Bless > 'em. That's why we like him so much!! ;-) > > Bruce Cremona502@cs.com > in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles > visit the Cornely pack at Howling Acres: Ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502 > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Wicks question From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 13:47:43 -0700   I've often wondered over the years how pitman chests came to be the = preferred windchest ... they're a NIGHTMARE to service. Just about ANYTHING is more durable, at least in urban areas with high pollution indexes.   Cheers,   Bud   Bob Kinner wrote:   > Bud, > > I agree wholeheartedly. I've always felt that Wicks went the right way = in > following the "KISS" method - keep it simple, stupid! If properly = built, > those chests will last forever and and be easily serviced with a = screwdriver > and a soldering iron. And they are a shoe-in for today's electronic > keyers. I am now in the process of installing a previously-loved organ = in > my church and, as the first step in the process, replaced all of the EP > action with EM. (The only concern the church expressed over the offer = was > "maintainance costs".) > > To start a soapbox uproar, the only thing EP action has going for it > nowadays is that it is "traditional" - and organ bulders love their > traditions. > > Bob > -- > Bob Kinner AA8FH rkinner@one.net > "If at first you don't succeed, switch to power tools." Red Green > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: RE: understanding the organ From: "Randy Terry" <randyterry@laumc.org> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 14:15:49 -0700   Understanding, even in the most basic terms, pipe scaling and voicing can really help. I have always relied on my ear first as to whether the = result was musical (with a variety of styles.) Then look at what was done to get that sound. Holding notes or sitting in during a voicing session and just listening to the changes in sound as they occur are most helpful. If a person wants to learn about this it is not difficult (does NOT make one a voicer, tho!) Many organists have no clue, though. Push general X for this, Q for that. Too bad. Randy   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of quilisma@socal.rr.com   The problem lies in our definition of "education" ... reading stoplists in the Diapason and TAO does NOT constitute an education in organ-building ... DIGESTING the majority of organ-building literature in the English = language MIGHT, if one coupled it with going to hear every organ (good and bad) within reach, but there is STILL the matter of the EAR ... one has to be able to discern what one is hearing ... and GOOD TASTE ... if we could figure out how to teach THAT ... well ...    
(back) Subject: Re: PCOrgan Instructions New Chapters Uploaded. From: "Paul R. Swank" <prswank@bellatlantic.net> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 17:38:18 -0400   Mick, I have been following your escapades with the digital PC organ and am very interested in it.   I would like to know what the actual screen looks like that you have when the organ program is opened. Are there stop-like icons, are there areas for the swell, great, pedal, etc.   Would the opening screen be able to be used with a touch-screen monitor = for ease of selecting stops?   I have read your small treatise on the project, and must say that for someone who does not know anything about the Building Blocks program, you would have to be a little slower and precise in the descriptions and explanations for each step.   I realise that you have been working with Building Blocks for quite some time now, and the fine points are quickly glossed over by you, naturally.   As you are no doubt aware, there are several ways to "play" the sound cards, Angel Keys, Midi Control Panel, but I have always found the actual screen to be used to select the pipe voices to be the sticking point in making the system work easily for an organist.   I am looking forward to more info on the PC organ project.   Paul R. Swank     you wrote: >Hello Folks. >Chapters 4 and 5 of my PC Organ Project instructions are up on my = homepage as >of Sunday Sept 17th am. > >There are also two jpg files of Building Blocks screengrabs. The files = are in >a Zip File called PCOrganZipFile2.zip. >The URL of my home page is; ><http://hometown.aol.com/mickberg/myhomepage/ptofile.html>.      
(back) Subject: Re: Wicks question(and Can't kill'm organs) From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 17:48:18 EDT   Hi Bud and List:   Bud writes:   Doesn't one of the factors in Wicks' longevity (over and above shrewd business acumen) have to do with their windchests being simpler and cheaper to build? And they're right up there with Austin and simple trackers in the "can't kill 'em" department, which counts for a LOT with churches that don't want to spend a lot of money on maintenance.   Ron Severin writes:   There are several, can't kill'm companies who make or made small pipe organs. Holzinger is one. Val Holzinger built a five rank unit organ for a sister's convent chapel at St. Catherine's Military School, Anaheim, =   CA. that was 1958. The console's pretty beat up, some Bourdon 16' pipes are made as module units of six pipes each out of pressed board, as well as the chests for the rest of the pipes. It hasn't been tuned in years, it doesn't leak air anywhere, and I can go up and turn it on this afternoon and play it. There are no dead notes either. The reed could use some regulation now, but that's all.   What people don't know about Val Holzinger is the fact he was the plant superintendant for Los Angeles Arts Organ Company when the future Wanamaker neucleus was built for the 1904 St. Louis World's Fair. He must have known what he was doing. Everyone threw rocks at his work. Well they still play faithfully anytime you need them and they still sound good. So much for criticism! He concentrated on building affordable organs for small churches and was very successful. The Wanamaker neucleus was built in four months, all 166 ranks were out the door and installed in the pavillion ready to be played on the opening day of the fair. Nobody could do that today, nobody.   They didn't have modern equipment as we know it. A steam turbine at one end of the building, with drive shafts running the full length of the building, ran machines attached to belt driven drives. Production never stopped 24/7. With this simple machinery they could do things and wrought miracles like that makes one pause and wonder, What happened! Murray Harris was the Co. President If I'm not mistaken.   I knew Val Holzinger personally. He's been gone a long time from this earth, but most of his little, can't kill'm organs still remain as a testament.   There have got to be other stories like this one,   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Felix burning out? Hell No From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 19:19:32 EDT   In a message dated 9/19/00 11:18:46 AM Eastern Daylight Time, Innkawgneeto@webtv.net writes:   << The only thing I worry about is whether Felix will get burnt out on organ playing. I hope not. >>   In a message dated 9/19/2000 4:08:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time, Cremona502@cs.com responded:   << Not as long as the big bucks keep rolling in!! Notice, too, he's not playing in church on Sunday morning. >>   At one time, I wondered not if Felix would "burn out," something I think = is impossible, knowing him as I do, but if he might be getting too much = exposure too soon in terms of building a career. But, as I wrote once to his = father, Hans, expressing a bit of concern about that, this is a huge country, and there will always be venues for him - and, the best news for Felix is that = he is now being asked back to play again in the same places. Knowing father = and son, I cannot believe that this is about dollar signs, although it must be =   very nice, and even helpful, to have this financial recognition of a great =   talent in a young man who really does communicate his love of both the = music and of those who come to hear him.   As for not playing in church, Felix is "organ scholar" at St. Peter's Lutheran Church in the Citicorp Building in New York. How much that = requires of him, I am not sure, but he indeed does have this Sunday morning home = base. Christoph Linde has recently completed tonal revisions on this somewhat elderly Klais, in general, warming and broadening things where they ought = to be broad. Felix will be heard there this Sunday at 2 p.m., for any within shouting distance. This will be a fun day for me, as I will also be able = to attend 6 p.m. Vespers at St. John the Divine, following which my friend Stuart Forster will be playing the customary improvisation recital. (These =   Vesper services have recently been moved to 6 from last year's 7 p.m.)   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler (in a very wet CT) www.mander-organs.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Small Stock Instruments From: "Kenneth LaFleur" <lafleur@pivot.net> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 19:38:04 -0700       ManderUSA@aol.com wrote: (in part) - > and I recall playing a very elegant example of one of these in a > church in Wayland, MA, west of Boston. It had 12 stops, 4, 4, & 4. = (There may > have been extensions in the pedal.)   That "elegant" little Rieger organ was bought by the First Parish in Wayland, UU, in 1960 at a cost of $7500 plus installation. Part of the latter was paid in kind -- that is, parishioners provided room and board for the craftsman who came from Europe, and did much of the dogsbody work under his direction. The total cost did not exceed $10,000. The elegant little instrument is still in use -- and still elegant. I heartily agree with Malcolm that this sort of small, nearly-stock instrument at a reasonable price could have been of great benefit to both builders and churches. The Hooks learned this lesson well.   Ken LaFleur (minister of that church in the 60's)  
(back) Subject: Re: Austins, etc. From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 20:12:06 EDT   In a message dated 9/19/2000 2:14:20 PM Eastern Daylight Time, Jason Comet =   writes:   << Optical keyswitches >>   These were installed recently in an organ he admires in upstate New York. They were also installed in an organ near me here in Connecticut. A large audience assembled for the rededication of this organ, after all the work = was done, and they sat expectantly, and they sat - and they sat - and no one could get the organ to play. It turned out that two quite bright lights = the organist had placed behind him, the better to read by, were also shining directly into the keyboard, totally confusing and disabling the optical switches.   Cheers,   Writ by Malcolm Wechsler, with the help of an optical computer mouse. www.mander-organs.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Moller Organs! From: "Douglas A Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 20:19:59 -0400   While discussing Moller instrumetents...........   The local AGO hosted a POE this summer and I was priviledged to be able to atend several of the events.   During the week, the students were taken to hear and play a wide variety of instruments including a Johnson from the 1860s, BOTH Holtkamps from Syracuse University, several E. M. Skinners, two totally different Mollers (both from 1968), and a wide assortment of other instruments.   When I aske  
(back) Subject: Re: Moller Organs! From: "Douglas A Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 20:22:47 -0400   While discussing Moller instrumetents...........   The local AGO hosted a POE this summer and I was priviledged to be able to atend several of the events.   During the week, the students were taken to hear and play a wide variety of instruments including a Johnson from the 1860s, BOTH Holtkamps from Syracuse University, several E. M. Skinners, two totally different Mollers (both from 1968), and a wide assortment of other instruments.   When I asked several of the more accomplished students which organ, of all they had played, they liked the best....I was more than a little surprised to hear the same answer every time !   a 1929 4 manual 42(+/-) rank MOLLER !!!!!!!!!!!!!       Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY  
(back) Subject: Re: Felix burning out? Hell No From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 22:09:34 -0500   At 9/19/00 07:19 PM, Malcom wrote:   <snip> >this is a huge country, and >there will always be venues for him - and, the best news for Felix is = that he >is now being asked back to play again in the same places.   Hear hear, Malcom! I heartily agree! Long live Felix -- he can do GREAT things for the instrument we all know and love, (things that need to be done!) and he has the world in front of him in which to do it.   Felix is already scheduled for a repeat-performance this coming spring at Subiaco Abbey here in Arkansas, and we are all hoping that there will be a chance this time to also have him play for us here in Little Rock while he is in the state. Details to follow when it is all finalized...   Tim Bovard Little Rock AR    
(back) Subject: Re: Wicks question(and Can't kill'm organs) From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 21:25:41   At 05:48 PM 9/19/2000 EDT, you wrote: >What people don't know about Val Holzinger is the fact he was the >plant superintendant for Los Angeles Arts Organ Company<snip>   L.A. ART Organ Co....singular   >They didn't have modern equipment as we know it. A steam turbine >at one end of the building, with drive shafts running the full length >of the building, ran machines attached to belt driven drives.<snip>   This was the plant either on on Van Nuys Blvd. or Sepulveda Blvd., if I remember right, on a siding of the old SP mainline into LA that was bypassed in 1904, becoming a Pacific Electric line. The St. Louis/future Wanamaker organ was loaded right out the side doors of the building into boxcars. It is now a Salvation Army store, and had an interesting = history in between!.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: NATIONAL SHRINE ORG From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 21:28:28   >Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 17:31:03 -0700 >From: Terry Mueller <tlm1217@earthlink.net> >X-Mailer: Mozilla 4.72 [en] (Win95; I) >X-Accept-Language: en >To: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@rglobal.net> >Subject: NATIONAL SHRINE ORG > >On the jacket of the Durufle's disk (rec. Sep. 1967) of the Washington DC >National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception: "The organs, built by = Moller >Organ Company, were dedicated April 25, 1965 . . . . The two organs are = the >quarter of a million dollar gift of the late Francis Cardinal Spellman of >New York and the Catholic Chaplains and Military personnel given in = memory >of the deceased chaplains and members of the Armed Forces." > >I'm not a member of Pipechat or any other list, but if this is worth >forwarding, feel free. > >Terry Mueller >Las Vegas > > > >  
(back) Subject: Re: Wicks question(and Can't kill'm organs) From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Wed, 20 Sep 2000 00:53:27 EDT   Hi Desert Bob:   Your input is always welcome. You really know your stuff and work to fill in the gaps. It's always appreciated by me, to get this wonderful history of the organ out for people to read and enjoy. You are a very necessary resource, and should be appreciated by all. All your knowledge comes directly from the heart. Thankyou so much again.   Regards ,   Ron Severin   Desert Bob writes:   This was the plant either on on Van Nuys Blvd. or Sepulveda Blvd., if I remember right, on a siding of the old SP mainline into LA that was bypassed in 1904, becoming a Pacific Electric line. The St. Louis/future Wanamaker organ was loaded right out the side doors of the building into boxcars. It is now a Salvation Army store, and had an interesting = history in between!.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Felix burning out? Hell No From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 20 Sep 2000 01:54:17 EDT   In a message dated 9/19/00 7:20:15 PM Eastern Daylight Time, ManderUSA@aol.com writes:   << Knowing father and son, I cannot believe that this is about dollar signs, although it must be very nice, and even helpful, to have this financial recognition of a great talent in a young man who really does communicate his love of both the = music and of those who come to hear him. >>   I didn't mean to insinuate that Felix was dollar-driven, but it certainly does help one's longevity in a career when you don't have to go home after =   playing a recital or church service and walk past a desk full of unpaid bills. Also knowing that you can't take a day off, or if you can take a =   day off from work you can't afford to go anywhere. I wish him the best, = and hope he has a long an satisfying career.   Bruce Cremona502@cs.com in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles visit the Cornely pack at Howling Acres: Ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: consulting From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 20 Sep 2000 01:54:16 EDT   In a message dated 9/19/00 4:35:10 PM Eastern Daylight Time, randyterry@laumc.org writes:   << always remember when you have the privelege to consult on changes and = such that you are not the last person to play the instrument. Someone will = come along after. >>   Horse pucky! You mentioned changes that you are making in the organ you =   are playing now. Are these changes being made in consideration of the person who will be organist NEXT. Do you know who that person IS? = There is no way to build using the idea of "what about the next organist"? = Don't worry about them. Give your best. Make the organ the best it possibly = can be. Preserve it and maintain it if it's worth it. Correct problems = and deficiencies and make appropriate changes if that is best. Don't worry about the next organist.... they might not even use their feet!   Bruce Cremona502@cs.com in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles visit the Cornely pack at Howling Acres: Ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Small Stock Instruments From: "Blaine Ricketts" <blaineri@home.com> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 23:01:58 -0700   Yes, I have a three rank Schoenstein from the late 40's early 50's era. It has 16'Gedeckt, 8' Salicional and 4' Octave. I also have an Austin = console about the same vintage unified with electric switches for four ranks. The original Schoenstein console is electro-pneumatic and in need of much = work. I'm trying to find a home for this organ which needs wiring and = installation of new electric action chest magnets which are included.   any offers?   Blaine Ricketts Castro Valley, CA   Randy Terry wrote: > > One must remember that Schoenstein has also reproduced a number of small > 6-10 rank organs using the English stock model (from the late 1800's) as = a > starting point. I remember seeing one in TAO some time back > > Great: 8' Diapason, 8' Lieblich Gedeckt (sw), 8' Dulciana (sw) 4' > Principal, 4' Flute (sw ext) > Swell: 8' Dulciana, 8' Unda Maris, 8' Lieblich Gedeckt, 4' Dulcet = (ext), 4' > Flute (ext), 2-2/3' Nasard (ext) 8' Trumpet (double enclosed) > Pedal 16' Bourdon (ext) other borrowed pedal stops, full couplers, etc. >  
(back) Subject: Re: consulting From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 23:28:03 -0700   I'M certainly thinking about that at St. Matthew's ... my health is = failing, and I will HAVE to retire in 5-10 years at the LATEST. On the one hand, I want = to build something that will lock in the "St. Matthew's" style of service = (which will NEVER change), but on the other hand I don't want to build something = so WILDLY eccentric that it will be difficult for them to find (and keep) a successor. *I* would have LOVED to have that 20-stop Appleton, G-compasses = and short Swell and all, but that would have virtually ASSURED that the NEXT = organist would order up the biggest Allen the budget would support. Nobody in these = parts would know how to PLAY the Appleton, or WANT to, sadly.   Cheers,   Bud   Cremona502@cs.com wrote:   > In a message dated 9/19/00 4:35:10 PM Eastern Daylight Time, > randyterry@laumc.org writes: > > << always remember when you have the privelege to consult on changes and = such > that you are not the last person to play the instrument. Someone will = come > along after. >> > > Horse pucky! You mentioned changes that you are making in the organ = you > are playing now. Are these changes being made in consideration of the > person who will be organist NEXT. Do you know who that person IS? = There > is no way to build using the idea of "what about the next organist"? = Don't > worry about them. Give your best. Make the organ the best it = possibly can > be. Preserve it and maintain it if it's worth it. Correct problems = and > deficiencies and make appropriate changes if that is best. Don't = worry > about the next organist.... they might not even use their feet! > > Bruce Cremona502@cs.com > in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles > visit the Cornely pack at Howling Acres: Ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502 >    
(back) Subject: Dennis James - Seattle Paramount - Silent Films From: <MUSCUR@aol.com> Date: Wed, 20 Sep 2000 04:20:22 EDT   As house organist for the Seattle Paramount Theatre playing the Publix #1 WurliTzer, I'm proud to announce the next silent film series lined up for = the month of October . . . five productions and all on Mondays, pre-show = lectures with Q&A starts at 7 p.m., the films start at 7:30 p.m. The themes are Science Fiction / Fantasy / Horror and Adventure:   October 2: THE LOST WORLD (1925, Bessie Love) The newly restored 35 mm = color tint archive print of this famous dinosaur fantasy featuring my organ transcription of the original compilation score (that will also be = presented in organ & orchestra format with the Oregon Symphony in Portland, OR on October 31!). This is based on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's popular novel and =   features animated dinosaurs by Willis H. O'Brien (who went on later to = create his masterpiece, the original KING KONG).   October 9: AELITA, QUEEN OF MARS (1924 Yakov Protazanov, director) This Soviet silent science-fiction feature is a wittily subversive document = from the advent of Communist collectivism during the establishment of the early =   Soviet social system. It tells the fantastic tale of a discouraged public =   works engineer who envisions an escapist world on Mars. The film = showcases sets and costumes designed in the innovative Soviet Constructivist and Futurist styles. I'll be playing my new score (assembled in 1991 = utilizing Soviet silent film music sent to me from the Moscow Cinematheque) together =   with the instrumental members of my Filmharmonia Ensemble flying up from = L.A. for the one performance. Featured together with the WurliTzer will be my performing the celebrated Soviet instrument, the theremin, plus the = Cristal Baschet (from France) and the Phonoviolin (from London) together with = cello and sound-effects.   October 16 PETER PAN (1924, Betty Bronson) Another West coast performance = of the show that sold out the El Capitan Theatre in April this year. This gorgeous 35mm color tint print will be accompanied using my recreation of = the original compilation orchestral score transcribed to organ.   October 23 SUBMARINE (1928, Jack Holt) A rarely shown early directing = effort by Frank Capra, this film shows the daring rescue of the crew of a sunken submarine off the coast of San Diego . . . based on a true event. The = 35mm print is fully restored, and my score is a new one assembled from period popular repertoire and published silent film generics.   October 30 PHANTOM OF THE OPERA (1925, Lon Chaney) the celebrated America cinema classic the recounts the story of a demented organist lurking in = the catacombs beneath Opera House who causes mayhem to reign throughout the = city of Paris. This is the 35mm archive print with Technicolor sections and = I'll be playing the original compilation orchestra score by G. Hinrichs and M. Winkler adapted for modern performance. Featured at this presentation = will be my new recreation of the opening "Man With the Lantern" spoken section lost since its release 1931.   Hope to see some of you there!