PipeChat Digest #1600Q - Thursday, September 21, 2000
 
Re: Wicks question
  by <TRACKELECT@cs.com>
Re: Wicks question (can't kill 'em- they won't die!)
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
RE: consulting
  by "Randy Terry" <randyterry@laumc.org>
Re: Wicks question
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Notre Dame Basilica Organ
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com>
Re: Austin organs
  by <Robert_Lind@cch.com>
RE: Austin organs
  by "Barry H Bodie MD" <bbodie@InfoAve.Net>
RE: St. Jame's Austin
  by "Randy Terry" <randyterry@laumc.org>
Re: PCOrgan Instructions New Chapters Uploaded.
  by <MickBerg@aol.com>
Update 9/17
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Re: Update 9/17
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Wicks, DE action, Can't kill'em, my diatribe.Long
  by <TRACKELECT@cs.com>
Re: Austin organs
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Bach Magnificat Continuo
  by <stalan@ix.netcom.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Wicks question From: <TRACKELECT@cs.com> Date: Wed, 20 Sep 2000 08:19:53 EDT   In a message dated 9/19/00 4:32:44 PM Eastern Daylight Time, = rkinner@one.net writes:   << To start a soapbox uproar, the only thing EP action has going for it nowadays is that it is "traditional" - and organ bulders love their traditions. >>     Two words: High pressure.   Alan B  
(back) Subject: Re: Wicks question (can't kill 'em- they won't die!) From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Wed, 20 Sep 2000 07:46:16 -0500   So far, the ONLY service problem with Wicks that I've come upon is a 65 = year old cable. A church has a 4 ranker in a free-standing case with the = keydesk built it (held in with two screws!). Thru the years of removing the desk = to access the trap door for tuning, the cable has developed problems: dead notes and runs. A wiggle of the cable at an elbow and the notes play = again. Also, Wicks made the pedal cable too short for pull-out. That's why I'm considering either a new cable, or a remote console = entirely (hence the Peterson swell motor) to facilitate easier congregation/choir direction.   Rick in Indiana.      
(back) Subject: RE: consulting From: "Randy Terry" <randyterry@laumc.org> Date: Wed, 20 Sep 2000 09:30:34 -0700   Well, Bruce, you do have a point. But in all honesty, I AM thinking. = Maybe more about the church than my successor, but I do think about both. I = have reconsidered my original plans a number of times. We have a great organ guy, Paul Sahlin, who has a 50 rank organ in his house (which can't be = much bigger than 1500 sq. ft!) and several other successful installations in = the area. He was the first one who urged me to be conservative in the = changes. It won't be long before they have to redo the old Klann console and add a relay. I would rather focus on tonal things as long as the console works. So, basically I am adding 2 ranks (a Viola and Oboe) and we are using our present Nasard (a chimney flute) to replace our Quintadena, and we will = use recycled pipes for the Nasard. The whole thing is costing about = $3,000.00, but by the time the voicing is all done it will SOUND new! I will let the church worry about the console when the time comes! Randy   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Cremona502@cs.com   You mentioned changes that you are making in the organ you are playing now. Are these changes being made in consideration of the person who will be organist NEXT.    
(back) Subject: Re: Wicks question From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Wed, 20 Sep 2000 09:34:21   At 08:19 AM 9/20/2000 EDT, you wrote: >Two words: High pressure.<snip>   More modern designs of EM valves can open reliably against high pressure, and more will be coming to market soon. One must bear in mind whilst investigating EM valve design that there are forces available for performing work other than the field of the coil! All one needs is a = small exhaust port vented to outside the chest....   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Notre Dame Basilica Organ From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com> Date: Wed, 20 Sep 2000 13:14:17 -0400   I have 3 pictures of the organ case in the Notre Dame Basilica, here in Montreal. It's a 4-manual Casavant, built from 1887 to 1891. It has over 6800 pipes, and is the 3rd largest in Montreal. If anyone would like to = see the pics, please let me know. E-mail me directly so I can reply with the pics.   Carlo  
(back) Subject: Re: Austin organs From: <Robert_Lind@cch.com> Date: Wed, 20 Sep 2000 12:54:16 -0500   My early experiences with Austin organs were relatively unpleasant. I = started organ study in Springfield, MA, at the age of 14, and even though Hartford = was a mere 20-some miles away, the Skinners held sway. The Austin at the = Episcopal Cathedral seemed inferior, as did the older, smaller one in my church.   Then I went to college in Chicago and soon studied Leo Sowerby's organ = works with him at his church, St. James Cathedral. The organ turned out to be a = very disappointing 40-rank Austin dating from 1920. People on various lists are singing the praises of the 1915 Austin in Chicago's Medinah Temple. I hope = they know what they're talking about. I was so put off by the St. James organ = (I became Sowerby's assistant and later succeeded him, so I agonized with the instrument for 6 years and lived through a very pedestrian Austin addition = of a transept organ installed in 1961 before I was in charge) that I never = bothered so much as to walk out and merely cross the street (Wabash Avenue) and go = into Medinah to try the organ. I suppose there are those who want to keep, = save, enshrine, and bronze (like baby shoes) the "Sowerby Organ". Be my guest. = I'll admit there were a few solo stops and a celeste that were nice, but they = do not an organ make.   On a much happier note, I enjoyed playing on several occasions the 1980s = Austin in St. Simon's Episcopal Church, Arlington Heights, IL.      
(back) Subject: RE: Austin organs From: "Barry H Bodie MD" <bbodie@InfoAve.Net> Date: Wed, 20 Sep 2000 14:33:25 -0400   Mr. Lind:   The old girl is finally getting a new look. St. James purchased the E.M. Skinner instrument from the Lyric Opera of Chicago and will combine the = two instruments. Too bad they didn't wait for the Medinah Temple instrument to become available. There will be additions to the main organ on the left = side of the church and to the transept organ. There will be an addition of a gallery division in the rear of the church which will include an en = chamade trumpet. The main organ will contain the Skinner 32' wooden Bombarde from the Opera and a Skinner Tuba Mirabilis on high pressure. The console for = the new organ came from the Royce Hall Skinner at UCLA. I hope the marriage of the two instruments proves sonically sound. I never heard the large Austin played, but I did hear the transept organ being played recently. It = provides quite a bit of sound for its size and was fully capable of supporting congregational singing. The church has published a very nice monograph on all the instruments which have served the congregation over the years. In addition to Dr. Sowerby and yourself, the church has been served by a variety of exceptional organists over the years including Dudley Buck and = my good friend Beverly A. Ward, also a student of Leo Sowerby.   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Robert_Lind@cch.com Sent: Wednesday, September 20, 2000 1:54 PM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Austin organs     My early experiences with Austin organs were relatively unpleasant. I started organ study in Springfield, MA, at the age of 14, and even though Hartford was a mere 20-some miles away, the Skinners held sway. The Austin at the = Episcopal Cathedral seemed inferior, as did the older, smaller one in my church.   Then I went to college in Chicago and soon studied Leo Sowerby's organ = works with him at his church, St. James Cathedral. The organ turned out to be a very disappointing 40-rank Austin dating from 1920. People on various lists are singing the praises of the 1915 Austin in Chicago's Medinah Temple. I hope they know what they're talking about. I was so put off by the St. James organ = (I became Sowerby's assistant and later succeeded him, so I agonized with the instrument for 6 years and lived through a very pedestrian Austin addition of a transept organ installed in 1961 before I was in charge) that I never bothered so much as to walk out and merely cross the street (Wabash Avenue) and go into Medinah to try the organ. I suppose there are those who want to keep, = save, enshrine, and bronze (like baby shoes) the "Sowerby Organ". Be my guest. I'll admit there were a few solo stops and a celeste that were nice, but they = do not an organ make.   On a much happier note, I enjoyed playing on several occasions the 1980s Austin in St. Simon's Episcopal Church, Arlington Heights, IL.       "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: RE: St. Jame's Austin From: "Randy Terry" <randyterry@laumc.org> Date: Wed, 20 Sep 2000 11:50:04 -0700   Information on this organ available from the Cathedral website, including the specs.   http://www.epischicago.org/Cathedral/OrganHistory.cfm   Quite interesting. Not that most of the organ is now Skinner!   Randy Terry   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of   The old girl is finally getting a new look. St. James purchased the E.M. Skinner instrument from the Lyric Opera of Chicago and will combine the = two instruments.    
(back) Subject: Re: PCOrgan Instructions New Chapters Uploaded. From: <MickBerg@aol.com> Date: Wed, 20 Sep 2000 15:55:21 EDT   Hi.   Paul Swank wrote:   <>   I chose Building Blocks because of its versatility. I could never get = Angel Keys to run on my computer. I've not heard of Midi Control Panel.   There are buttons on the Control Panel for the stops, but they look like Visual Basic buttons. (There is no capability in Building Blocks for customized buttons at this time.) There are also sliders to regulate the volume of each stop. However the Control Panel seems to take a lot of computer resources, and you have to be careful how enormous a Control = Panel you create!   If a touch-screen monitor can be used to emulate clicking a mouse on an = area of the screen, then I think it should work. I have never investigated touch-screens.   The thing to do with Building Blocks is to play with it, (it will do all kinds of interesting things) and read the very good Help system, and experiment. One of the reasons why I decided not to charge money for this project, was that I hope that people will improve on my design, and add features.   I tried to be very explicit in the earlier chapters, but sped up the pace = a bit later on, as I thought readers would now be familiar with the basic workings of Building Blocks. I didn't spend time explaining how to use Building Blocks, as its own Help system is very good.   If you would tell me in what areas I have been unclear, I will write something up to clarify them.   Mick Berg.  
(back) Subject: Update 9/17 From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Wed, 20 Sep 2000 16:28:44 EDT   Dear friends, This has been an eventful month! Kimo and I flew to Duluth, MN on August 15 to gather his possessions. = When we arrived, his ex had trashed the place, and her son was "storing" a = large dog in the condo. Well, Sleepy (the dog) turned out to be a Sweetie, but there was still a lot of shoveling to do. Kimo's things were pretty much homogenized throughout the place, and it took an extra week to sort = through and pack what was salvageable. We drove a full 17' U-Haul box truck with = his VW Sirocco in tow from Duluth to Long Island in 3 1/2 blessedly uneventful =   days, a total of 1520 miles. Highlights: I met his daughter Malia, a truly terrific kid. There is a good chance that she may move in with us when we have a larger place, = which would make him extatic (and me too). I would be nice to have a kid around =   again - my baby is 15, and, to Carolyn, I am incredibly stupid right now. And, Malia found a very small abandoned kitten, named her "Me" because that's what she said as she poked out from under the car, and brought her = to me because "I needed a cat." Me is a Persian cross, and a total maniac - = we think she's about 7 weeks old now. She is a well-traveled and mostly = polite little grey and white cat. And, Kimo taught me to drive his car. This was a real test of our relationship - he prizes his Sirocco, and I'm a flatlander and was = learning to drive a standard transmission on hills. The car and I both survived = the lessons, and as Kimo says, "It's just a clutch plate." And, now that I = can be trusted to drive it, it's a lot of fun - it has a Porche engine, and flies!!! We got back to Long Island just before the Labor Day rush, and I had a = chemo session on the Tuesday following Labor Day. This one hit me really hard - = I was horizontal for almost a week, and my blood counts still aren't up to acceptable ranges despite the booster shots I'm getting. I have one more = of the really nasty chemical cocktails, and then get switched to something slightly less toxic. Here's hoping this next session doesn't flatten me = as did the last one - I don't have time for that nonsense! I'm planning something special for Halloween. I've lost all my hair now, =   and I'm considering going as either Uncle Fester from the Addams Family, = or just having a brain painted on my scalp. Either one should startle the kiddies! Most of the time, I wear a blonde bombshell wig I found in the Frederick's of Hollywood catalog. Well, gee, if my daughter Carolyn can = have that hair color, why can't I???? I can always use the excuse that the = chemo has gone to my brain. My older daughter Laura started college the beginning of September. = She's attending the local community college on the honors program and is = studying interior design. I am so proud of her. That pretty much sums up the last 5 weeks. I am looking into a few = organist positions that I've heard about through the grapevine, but the reaction I = had to the last chemo has me nervous. I'm not sure I'd have the stamina to = play an entire service the week following my chemo sessions, and I'm really out = of commission one week out of every three. Fortunately, Kimo's and my = business, Spectral Resoultions, is a graphic design firm located in our second = bedroom, so I can alternate working and napping. Thank you for all of your caring notes and emails - it really helps to = know there are folks out there pulling for me. Vicki  
(back) Subject: Re: Update 9/17 From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Wed, 20 Sep 2000 18:02:15 -0500   Hi Vickie- If you have organ positions available, don't rush into them = just yet. Take care of yourself first and foremost. On Halloween- Uncle Fester? -a brain? -go with the fright wig: Want some = 70s platforms to go with that? P.S. -I have a shepherd-husky-wolf mix that would just *love* to meet Sleepy!   Rick in Indiana.      
(back) Subject: Wicks, DE action, Can't kill'em, my diatribe.Long From: <TRACKELECT@cs.com> Date: Wed, 20 Sep 2000 21:16:01 EDT   Now that I have some time to sit here and try to type with my big fat = fingers I have to say that old man Wick is to be commended for inventing(?) direct =   electric action. I have serviced Wicks from 1914 that were completely original and reliable. The only problem that they had were the little = wooden valve seats kept falling off because the hide glue was dried out (how the hell did they make those things anyway?!!). Electro - mechanical valves = will last virtually forever provided that that they are properly made. One = supply house brand has developed a reputation for rusting hinge pins. This was because of improper plating during a period of production. This has been corrected but I received samples recently and the quality is lousy. Way = too loose, armature rub etc. There are a couple of brands that are working off = an old Wurlitzer relay magnet design but again here I see poor quality = control and there is almost no way to adjust spring tension. There are solenoid = type valves that may seem very cleaver in that they take up very little toe = board space but I wouldn't touch these things with a ten foot tuning iron. They = are lots of trouble once they are more than ten years old. The valves that I = use are made by Peterson. They are very precisely made and very reliable. = However you really have to know what you are doing when you mount them. I have several designs on the drawing board for a DE valve to use with my = electric tracker action but so far have found no one willing to produce it.   Part two: Bad stuff DE action has gotten a bad name because of several things. First is the people without the experience to know what they are doing. Anyone can (and =   frequently does) open up a supply house catalog, order hundreds of DE magnets, order a bunch of wood, buy some cheap tools and call himself an organbuilder. This frequently results in several things that I have seen = over and over. Toeboards that are too thin resulting in downright awful pipe speech. Toeboards that have been coated on the valve side with poly eurothane, shellac, lacquer or something. This causes the pallets to stick =   and make dead notes. Totally improper winding; either way over kill with = so many reservoirs that you can't get to anything or tiny blowers with a = single small reservoir and the resulting shaky wind. This kind of stuff has given = DE action a bad name. There are many builders who are experts at building = really good DE organs and I must say that it is a shame that they do not sell = more organs and that the 'Big boys with their huge factories, high pressure salesmen, service reps and EP action still get so many jobs. However; There are situations where DE simply cannot be used. Any thing = that calls for more 10" of wind will not work well on DE. Big pedal stuff is better off with EP. DE simply pulls too much current to use with really = big pipes and has poor speech as well. One could use Wicks balanced valves but =   that is their thing and I for one don't want to steal it. Well, that's it, =   I'm going to bed now. Yawn.  
(back) Subject: Re: Austin organs From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Wed, 20 Sep 2000 23:18:57 EDT   In a message dated 9/20/00 1:55:03 PM Eastern Daylight Time, Robert_Lind@cch.com writes:   << I suppose there are those who want to keep, save, enshrine, and bronze (like baby shoes) the "Sowerby Organ". Be my guest. = I'll admit there were a few solo stops and a celeste that were nice, but they = do not an organ make. >>   Thanks for the interesting history. Do you know what has become of the = St. James Austin?   Bruce Cremona502@cs.com in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles visit the Cornely pack at Howling Acres: Ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Bach Magnificat Continuo From: <stalan@ix.netcom.com> Date: Thu, 21 Sep 2000 00:19:35 -0500   Bach MAG / "Sicut locutus" --   This is a choral fugue, the "first eight bars" are the subject. It is not a bass to be realized, hence the absence of figures. That's as scholarly and aesthetic as it gets... chorus and continuo... Cheers to your performance! Now, if you can find string players that will play without vibrating... and cussing you!   Scott Austin   > Subject: Bach Magnificat Continuo > From: "Chris Johns" <Chris_Johns@gmx.de> > I am playing continuo (organ) in the Bach Magnificat for the > first time next weekend, and was intrigued by the fact that in > both the Barenreiter and Peters editions, there is no continuo > realisation for the first eight bars of "Sicut locutus est" > (No. 11), other than a doubling of the voice parts. > As none of the continuo bass is figured, and it appears to be > left to the player's musicianship to supply the right hand part, > is there any good reason not to do the same for these bars? > I would be interested in both scholarly and aesthetic arguments > both ways (acknowledging, of course, that the two are not > mutually exclusive!). If interest merits, I'll post a > compilation. > Chris Johns