PipeChat Digest #1331 - Saturday, April 1, 2000
 
Virus
  by "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net>
Re: Virus
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
Rie Hiroe-Lang in New York
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
What does this mean: "the cancer of the 'Tilt-ups'?
  by "Richard Schneider, President" <arpncorn@davesworld.net>
And the angels lit the candles
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: And the angels lit the candles
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
Re: And the angels lit the candles
  by "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com>
Re: What does this mean: "the cancer of the 'Tilt-ups'?
  by <JamesM8336@aol.com>
Re: What does this mean: "the cancer of the 'Tilt-ups'?
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Spamming  (WAS: Re: What does this mean:)
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: And the angels lit the candles and the Rector elevated the cash
  by <Quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: And the angels lit the candles and the Rector elevated the	cash
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net>
St. Thomas Recital 5:15 pm April 2 (fwd)
  by "Karl E. Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersv.edu>
Re: St. Thomas Recital 5:15 pm April 2 (fwd)
  by "Matthew J Collins" <mcoll@panix.com>
... by wearing lace all over the place
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: And the angels lit the candles and the Rector elevated the cash
  by <flcg1018@mails.fju.edu.tw>
Re: And the angels lit the candles and the Rector elevated thecash
  by "John  M. Doney" <jdoney@email.msn.com>
Re: And the angels lit the candles and the Rector elevated thecash
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
Re: And the angels lit the candles and the Rector elevated thecash
  by <Cantuar@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: Virus From: "Patricia/Thomas Gregory" <tgregory@speeddial.net> Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2000 06:05:00 -0600   Does anyone know if this virus attacks Macs?   Sincerely,   Tom Gregory  
(back) Subject: Re: Virus From: "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2000 07:14:34 -0600   >Does anyone know if this virus attacks Macs? > >Sincerely, > >Tom Gregory   Tom and others   It doesn't attack MACS - that is why I didn't catch it right away since I use, as well as this list runs on MACS. The "worm", really only takes into an account a security opening in MS Outlook Express on PCs.   Having said that I hope that the list can get back on topic since really according to the guideline discussions such as these are Off-Topic. If people have any questions that can address them to me at the Admin address or my personal address but should keep them off the list.   David   **************************************** David Scribner Co-Owner / Technical Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org 850-478-9635 mailto:david@blackiris.com  
(back) Subject: Rie Hiroe-Lang in New York From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2000 10:50:21 EST   Dear Lists,   With the enthusiasm of Glenda Sutton echoing in my ears, I trotted into = New York yesterday to hear Rie Hiroe-Lang play on the fine Gilbault-Therien = organ in the equally fine Chapel of the Reformed Faith at Brick Presbyterian Church. Both the room and the instrument are pilgrimage-worthy, for any of =   our far-flung listmembers planning to be in the New York area. There is no =   more-hospitable organist in New York than Keith Toth, whom you can reach = at < kstoth@MAIL.COM >.   For Ms. Hiroe-Lang, it was something like "If this is Thursday, it must be =   New York!" She is on an extensive tour (a few enthusiastic reviews have already appeared on these lists), and she really had to stop and think = before answering questions about where she had been and where she is going next, = and then got it wrong anyway. I was about to ask: "Is that your final answer?"   The program with some comments:   Bach St. Anne (552), not, I think, this fine player's strong suit. I found = it inflexible and inarticulate, with a heaviness of touch. This organ has a powerful and somewhat opaque Pedal 16 Basson, very useful in other = contexts, but overpowering and annoying in contrapuntal textures - it stayed with us =   through the entire Prelude. I wanted it off, but left the remote at home. = I know that "how we always did things" doesn't work anymore, if it ever did, =   but hearing the second section of the Fugue, which seems to call for a lighter texture, on a full registration was not pleasant to these ears. = This meant that there was no contrast between it and the next section. I know = this question of registration contrasts in the big Preludes and Fugues is = somewhat controversial.   This organ has a Harmonic Flute to die for, and Ms. Hiroe-Lang made it = sing its best in the Mozart Andante in F Major, KV 616. It was gorgeous. I = thought I heard happy sighs coming from Guy Therien, who was sitting next to me. = Then we settled into literature which this organist obviously adores, and we adored it with her. The Mendelssohn Sonatas are still deservedly heard in recitals, but lately, the Preludes and Fugues are having their day, and we =   were given a really warm, yea passionate performance of the P & F in C = Minor, Opus 18. This was followed by Naiades, a bit of a Chopin Etude, but by Vierne, impeccably played.   There is no bit of Franck that I do not love, although I find the Final in = B Flat somewhat embarrassing. (My favorite of all the Franck works, if = anyone wants to know, is not an organ work, but rather the Prelude, Choral and = Fugue for Piano. If you don't know it, seek it out.) Last night we heard a truly =   loving performance of the Prelude, Fugue & Variation. This organ has a wonderful Basson-Haubois, of which I think the Master himself would have approved, and coupled with really sensitive playing, both Prelude and Variation were delicious. I don't believe I have ever heard the Fugue = played more slowly, but Ms. Hiroe-Lang made it work without losing any momentum. Every little harmonic crunch meant that much more at her tempo, and I grew = to like it.   I echo Glenda Sutton's remarks about the Schumann. From the Six Fugues on B-A-C-H, Opus 60, we heard No. 2, Lebhaft; Number 5, also Lebhaft; and No. = 6, Massig, nach und nach schneller-lebhafter (major acceleration here!). = These are indeed rich and full works which are really not heard in concert. = Thanks to Ms. Hiroe-Lang, not only for bringing them to us, but for performing = them with such excitement and flair - a great ending to a splendid concert.   The Brick Church deserves enormous praise for making itself available automatically as a concert venue for young winners of the major = organ-playing competitions. This means they pay the artist's fee, provide accommodation, = do a large mailing, promotion on the Internet, and make sure the notices go = to all the media music listings. The administration of all this is no small matter. There is no admission charge for these concerts, by the way.   So, there's a happy story. Do go and hear this engaging young artist, or even engage this young artist, if the opportunity arises. You'll have no = problem communicating. She speaks Japanese, German, English, and "French for emergencies." Or was it English for emergencies - I can't recall. She was winner of the Chartres Competition in 1998.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com  
(back) Subject: What does this mean: "the cancer of the 'Tilt-ups'? From: "Richard Schneider, President" <arpncorn@davesworld.net> Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2000 11:15:11 -0600   Bob Scarborough recently wrote:   > . . . as the cancers of the "tilt-ups". . .   OK, I'm going to confess my ignorance and ask exactly what is meant by this term? In other words: I don't think it obviously wasn't coined to represent churches, so what WAS it originally meant to imply? Is this supposed to be some kind of building construction technique, or what??   If so, then apparently, I've never seen one. That's what one gets for living in the "corn patch", I suppose.   Given the fact that my wife and I happily belong to an Assembly of God church (which I am gathering is meant to be included in the "tilt-up" group, which I hardly consider to be a "here today-gone tomorrow" church by any means!), after a miserable 17 years in a "stuffed shirt" LCMS church; I am somewhat dismayed at the sweeping generalization implied here.   Faithfully,   "Arp in the Corn Patch" Richard Schneider SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Organbuilders 41-43 Johnston St. P. O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com Business EMAIL rnjs@family-net.net Personal EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com Web Page URL  
(back) Subject: And the angels lit the candles From: "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2000 13:28:35 -0500   > From: quilisma@socal.rr.com > > have you never been in an old-fashioned Anglican church where the > "fire worshipping" ceremony is still carried out? Chimes, orison hymns, = and > the > solemn procession of the acolytes to and from the altar, all for the = sole > purpose of lighting or putting out the candles ... we do it ALL (grin). = But > you > KNEW we would (bigger grin).   Yes, Bud, I have been there (specifically in San Diego and the Bay Area), but it's been more than forty years. And we did those sillies in those = days too. But I've kind of excused US for doing that, because we had no idea what to DO, but wanted to "do" SOMETHING, so we made up these things, or = got them from the Anglicans. But you didn't HAVE that excuse. You already had books full of detailed instructions on how to do VASTLY complicated stuff (I've got them, now).   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: And the angels lit the candles From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2000 13:50:45 EST   In a message dated 3/31/00 1:29:39 PM Eastern Standard Time, Quilisma = writes:   << "fire worshipping" ceremony >>   The most common manifestation of this in the Episcopal Churches of my experience was a mystery to me for a while, as I played well-practiced postludes from my lofty balcony, back in my student days. These brilliant performances followed the great march out of clergy and choir during the final hymn. Then there was the dismissal, "Go forth in peace," but no one went forth. I thought, "wow, they love me." Then at some magical moment = about half way into my piece, everyone quietly rose and left. Did they hear that =   wrong note? How did I offend? It was a while before I realized they were waiting solemnly in place until the last of the candles was extinguished, something I could not see in my mirror. I thought briefly of abruptly stopping playing when the last of the candles was out, but only briefly.   Malcolm (Lux benigna) Wechsler www.mander-organs.com  
(back) Subject: Re: And the angels lit the candles From: "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com> Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2000 13:53:26 -0500       ManderUSA@aol.com wrote:   > > The most common manifestation of this in the Episcopal Churches of my > experience was a mystery to me for a while, as I played well-practiced > postludes from my lofty balcony, back in my student days.   Gee, in the churches I've been in, the minister was lucky if they waited for him to descend from the altar before they made for the door.  
(back) Subject: Re: What does this mean: "the cancer of the 'Tilt-ups'? From: <JamesM8336@aol.com> Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2000 14:01:45 EST   And what is meant by a "stuffed shirt" LCMS church??  
(back) Subject: Re: What does this mean: "the cancer of the 'Tilt-ups'? From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2000 11:56:18   At 11:15 AM 3/31/2000 -0600, you wrote:   >OK, I'm going to confess my ignorance and ask exactly what is meant by >this term? In other words: I don't think it obviously wasn't coined to >represent churches, so what WAS it originally meant to imply? Is this >supposed to be some kind of building construction technique, or = what??<snip>   It's the building technique of choice for cheap, quick construction of industrial parks and some shopping malls. It involves using pre-cast concrete walls that are trucked to the site, dumped on the ground in position, and then "tilted up" using a crane and then propped up to await roof beams. Many "quick money" churches use industrial parks as venues of choice, since they offer a lot of square footage for the money and no long term commitment.   >Given the fact that my wife and I happily belong to an Assembly of God >church (which I am gathering is meant to be included in the "tilt-up" >group, which I hardly consider to be a "here today-gone tomorrow" church >by any means!), after a miserable 17 years in a "stuffed shirt" LCMS >church; I am somewhat dismayed at the sweeping generalization implied >here.<snip>   Most all AOG churches are not "tilt-ups", and revile any association to people like Swaggart. Most faught diligently to keep Swaggart off the pulpit for a period of a year after his first round of "indiscretions". However, money talks, and the Louisiana council allowed him back on the = air after only three months "penance". As one AOG minister related to me, "We've got our church, and Louisiana's got their's...along with millions = of dollars in cash."   In other news....   Today, I got spammed by some outfit called "Praise TV", offering "beta testing" of some new website offering "God-stuff" laced with tons of CCM. It's an outfit calling itself "Christian Music Television". I'm trying to locate the source of the spamming, whether it be from this list, the Hammond list, or elsewhere. Did anyone else get this?   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Spamming (WAS: Re: What does this mean:) From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2000 14:06:12 -0600   At 11:56 AM -0600 3/31/00, Bob Scarborough wrote: >Today, I got spammed by some outfit called "Praise TV", offering "beta >testing" of some new website offering "God-stuff" laced with tons of CCM. >It's an outfit calling itself "Christian Music Television". I'm trying = to >locate the source of the spamming, whether it be from this list, the >Hammond list, or elsewhere. Did anyone else get this?   Bob   You can be certain that it is not from this list unless someone has collected various member's addresses from their postings. The only people that access to the subscription list are the List Owners/Administrators. And the same goes for the EORG-L and DIYAPASON-L lists, both of which also runs off of this same server.   David    
(back) Subject: Re: And the angels lit the candles and the Rector elevated the cash From: <Quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2000 12:12:10 -0800   Earnest Young Rector tried (briefly and unsuccessfully) to dislodge it, = and was met by a SOLID wall of resistance from parishioners of ALL ages and ALL backgrounds, having to do mostly with their fondness for the words and = music of "Day By Day" (set to "Sumner", NOT "Godspell"). And if I began the closing voluntary before the LAST candle was out, they'd probably lynch me on the = SPOT (grin). It's the kind of "Kodak Moment" that the older generation of = organists USED to cultivate in places like St. Bart's and Celestial Snooze ... = another was the Solemn Elevation of the Cash at Morning Prayer ... St. Bart's in = particular had a complicated script involving a spectacular organ improvisation, = building to full organ, at which point the choir would burst into some kind of = Doxology, and then dying away to nothing as the acolytes put the Receiving Basons away. = Wasn't it St. Bart's that collected in velvet bags, and had a discreet notice in = the bulletin that read "Silent Offerings Only" (meaning no loose change)?   Cheers,   Bud   ManderUSA@aol.com wrote:   > In a message dated 3/31/00 1:29:39 PM Eastern Standard Time, Quilisma = writes: > > << "fire worshipping" ceremony >> > > The most common manifestation of this in the Episcopal Churches of my > experience was a mystery to me for a while, as I played well-practiced > postludes from my lofty balcony, back in my student days. These = brilliant > performances followed the great march out of clergy and choir during the > final hymn. Then there was the dismissal, "Go forth in peace," but no = one > went forth. I thought, "wow, they love me." Then at some magical moment = about > half way into my piece, everyone quietly rose and left. Did they hear = that > wrong note? How did I offend? It was a while before I realized they were > waiting solemnly in place until the last of the candles was = extinguished, > something I could not see in my mirror. I thought briefly of abruptly > stopping playing when the last of the candles was out, but only briefly. > > Malcolm (Lux benigna) Wechsler > www.mander-organs.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: And the angels lit the candles and the Rector elevated the cash From: "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2000 16:06:38 -0500   > From: Quilisma@socal.rr.com > > Earnest Young Rector tried (briefly and unsuccessfully) to dislodge it, = and > was met by a SOLID wall of resistance from parishioners of ALL ages and = ALL > backgrounds, having to do mostly with their fondness for the words and = music > of "Day By Day" (set to "Sumner", NOT "Godspell"). And if I began the = closing > voluntary before the LAST candle was out, they'd probably lynch me on = the SPOT > (grin). It's the kind of "Kodak Moment" that the older generation of = organists > USED to cultivate in places like St. Bart's and Celestial Snooze ... = another > was the Solemn Elevation of the Cash at Morning Prayer ... St. Bart's in > particular had a complicated script involving a spectacular organ > improvisation, building to full organ, at which point the choir would = burst > into some kind of Doxology, and then dying away to nothing as the = acolytes > put the Receiving Basons away. > Wasn't it St. Bart's that collected in velvet bags, and had a discreet = notice > in the bulletin that read "Silent Offerings Only" (meaning no loose = change)? > Amazing--but all believable. Actually, I've never been to St. Bart's for = a service--only for concerts. But if I arrive early for a concert, and Evensong is just finishing, I see enough in one minute to persuade me that this is Riverside Midtown, and not a place I'd choose for serious worship (ignoring for the moment the forbidding interior architecture--though I = love the exterior).   St. Thomas: Different story. One of the warmest interiors on earth. And the ceremonial may be a bit self-conscious, but it mostly avoids such = funny things (to me) as rochets, chimeres, and tippets (Sarum stuff?), so I feel more at home.   And yet again: When the Anglicans (over)did these things, they seemed to = be doing them in addition to more substantial things, rather than instead of more substantial things (which I accuse us of doing, in those days).   Alan        
(back) Subject: St. Thomas Recital 5:15 pm April 2 (fwd) From: "Karl E. Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersv.edu> Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2000 17:27:34 -0500 (EST)   Program for Sunday, April 2, 2000 at 5:15 pm played on the two organs* of St. Thomas Church, Fifth Avenue at 53rd Street   by=20   Peter Stoltzfus Minister of Music and Organist Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims Brooklyn, New York   *The three Bach works will be played on the Loening-Hancock Organ in the Re= ar=20 Gallery, a 1996 Taylor and Boody Baroque tracker organ well suited to this= =20 part of the program.       Paraphrase on =93Te Deum,=94 Opus 43 (1946) Marcel Dupr=E9 (1886-1971)   Fifteen pieces, founded on Antiphons (V=EApres du commun), Opus 18 (1919) = =20 Dupr=E9 Ave maris stella III. So now as we journey, aid our weak endeavor Choral ornamented in the style of J. S. Bach. *(played surreptitiously by Judith Hancock, Associate Organist of Saint=20 Thomas Church)   Fantasie in C minor, S. 582 Johann Sebastian Bach=20 (1685-1750) =20   Bach=92s Memento (1925) Charles-Marie Widor =20 V. Sicilienne (1844-1937) = =20 (transcribed from the Sonata for Flute and Cembalo, S. 1031)   Prelude and Fugue in E Minor, S.548 (=93Wedge=94) Bach   *Traveling music to return the recitalist to the front organ following the= =20 Bach will be improvised by Dr. Gerre Hancock, Organist and Master of=20 Choristers of Saint Thomas Church.   Meditation on =93Picardy,=94 H. 247 (1940) Leo Sowerby (1895-1968)     Prelude on =93Slane=94 (1986) Gerre Hancock (born 1934)     Toccata on =93Beecher=94 (2000) Peter Stoltzfus (born 1968)      
(back) Subject: Re: St. Thomas Recital 5:15 pm April 2 (fwd) From: "Matthew J Collins" <mcoll@panix.com> Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2000 18:41:35 -0500   At 05:27 PM 3/31/00 -0500, you wrote: >Program for Sunday, April 2, 2000 at 5:15 pm >played on the two organs* of >St. Thomas Church, Fifth Avenue at 53rd Street >>by >Peter Stoltzfus >Minister of Music and Organist >Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims >Brooklyn, New York   And I would be remiss here if I didn't point out that Peter is a fine organist, and this should be an enjoyable recital (full disclosure: he's = my instructor, and no, he didn't ask me to put in a plug for him).   --- MJC    
(back) Subject: ... by wearing lace all over the place From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2000 16:52:47 -0800       Alan Freed wrote:   > (snip) > > St. Thomas: Different story. One of the warmest interiors on earth. = And > the ceremonial may be a bit self-conscious, but it mostly avoids such = funny > things (to me) as rochets, chimeres, and tippets (Sarum stuff?), so I = feel > more at home.   Nope, part and parcel of the tradition from the beginning. A bishop's = "choir garb" (paratus in chori) consists of a white rochet (like an alb, but with = gathered sleeves) and a black, purple or scarlet chimere (like an elongated zip-out = liner for a coat ... a sleevless duster affair open in the front), and, in the old = days, a square Canterbury cap like the WOMEN choristers at St. Bart's wear = (wore?). Neither are normally worn by priests. I forget the origin of the tippet = (mis-called the "black stole", which of course it isn't) ... it's main function these days = seems to be to carry the coat of arms of the priest's seminary, and his own = personal coat arms or (more likely) the coat of arms of the diocese or parish, which are = sewn on the ends.   Someone once remarked that tippets and academic hoods served more than a = decorative function in the unheated churches and cathedrals in England.   > > > And yet again: When the Anglicans (over)did these things, they seemed = to be > doing them in addition to more substantial things, rather than instead = of > more substantial things (which I accuse us of doing, in those days). > > Alan   Anglo-Catholics took particular exception to all the nonsense surrounding = the cash at the "Offertory" of Morning Prayer, since it wasn't a real Offertory at = all. They saw it as an almost-blasphemous parody of the Elevations at Mass. To this = day, most Anglo-Catholic churches don't sing the Doxology when the cash is presented = (we do, for some reason ... probably our mixed ancestry as a parish), elevate it = (we don't) and the priest never touches it (ours doesn't) ... at most they wave a = blessing at it from the predella as the acolyte takes it away.   Gotta go do Evensong ... parish soup and bread and Bible study for Lent = tonight.   Cheers,   Bud   > >    
(back) Subject: Re: And the angels lit the candles and the Rector elevated the cash From: <flcg1018@mails.fju.edu.tw> Date: Sat, 1 Apr 2000 10:50:48 +0800 (CST)       On Fri, 31 Mar 2000 Quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote:   > Earnest Young Rector tried (briefly and unsuccessfully) to dislodge it, = and was > met by a SOLID wall of resistance from parishioners of ALL ages and ALL > backgrounds, having to do mostly with their fondness for the words and = music of > "Day By Day" (set to "Sumner", NOT "Godspell"). And if I began the = closing > voluntary before the LAST candle was out, they'd probably lynch me on = the SPOT > (grin). It's the kind of "Kodak Moment" that the older generation of = organists > USED to cultivate in places like St. Bart's and Celestial Snooze ... = another was > the Solemn Elevation of the Cash at Morning Prayer ... St. Bart's in = particular > had a complicated script involving a spectacular organ improvisation, = building to > full organ, at which point the choir would burst into some kind of = Doxology, and > then dying away to nothing as the acolytes put the Receiving Basons = away. Wasn't > it St. Bart's that collected in velvet bags, and had a discreet notice = in the > bulletin that read "Silent Offerings Only" (meaning no loose change)? >   St Bart's =3D St. Bartholomew's in New York City, right?   The Doxology may have been "Holy Offerings Rich and Rare ---" DOn't have my 1940 Hymnal with me, but it might have been Hymn 482... Unfortunately that hymn didn't make it to the 1982 Hymnal...   Best wishes,     Morton Belcher     > Cheers, > > Bud >  
(back) Subject: Re: And the angels lit the candles and the Rector elevated thecash From: "John M. Doney" <jdoney@email.msn.com> Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2000 22:05:30 -0000   <<St. Bart's in particular <<had a complicated script involving a spectacular organ <<improvisation, building to <<full organ, at which point the choir would burst into some kind of <<Doxology, and <<then dying away to nothing >>   I used to play in an Episcopal Church in Connecticut which did the same thing except following the Doxology, the acolytes would grab theUnited States Flag and the Episcopal Flag, bring them in front of the altar, = facing them to the congregation while we sang the last verse of America "Our Father's God to Thee...." with suitable dramatic accompaniment by me - starting softly, adding on each line, and finally opening the Swell to let the tigers out on the last line. John        
(back) Subject: Re: And the angels lit the candles and the Rector elevated thecash From: <DudelK@aol.com> Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2000 22:23:49 EST   In a message dated 3/31/00 10:08:14 PM Eastern Standard Time, jdoney@email.msn.com writes:   << I used to play in an Episcopal Church in Connecticut which did the same thing except following the Doxology, the acolytes would grab theUnited States Flag and the Episcopal Flag, bring them in front of the altar, = facing them to the congregation while we sang the last verse of America "Our Father's God to Thee...." with suitable dramatic accompaniment by me - starting softly, adding on each line, and finally opening the Swell to = let the tigers out on the last line. John >> Sounds fabulous!!!! Sorry I never got to see/hear it.  
(back) Subject: Re: And the angels lit the candles and the Rector elevated thecash From: <Cantuar@aol.com> Date: Sat, 1 Apr 2000 02:40:27 EST   In a message dated 3/31/00 10:24:56 PM Eastern Standard Time, = DudelK@aol.com writes:   << I used to play in an Episcopal Church in Connecticut which did the same thing except following the Doxology, the acolytes would grab theUnited States Flag and the Episcopal Flag, bring them in front of the altar, = facing them to the congregation while we sang the last verse of America "Our Father's God to Thee...." with suitable dramatic accompaniment by me - starting softly, adding on each line, and finally opening the Swell to = let the tigers out on the last line. John >>   Come to Maryland.We do that on the second and fourth Sunday when whe do morning prayer.   Travers Koerner