PipeChat Digest #1341 - Sunday, April 9, 2000
 
(no subject)
  by "dm726" <dm726@delphi.com>
Re: small pipe organ for sale
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Tubular Casavant Trumpet tuning
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re:  The Haskell / Estey connection
  by <TRACKELECT@cs.com>
Re: Tubular Casavant Trumpet tuning
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: The Haskell / Estey connection
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Estey oboe
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
 


(back) Subject: (no subject) From: "dm726" <dm726@delphi.com> Date: Sat, 08 Apr 2000 10:31:38 -0400   I am not sure if someone has posted this to the lists already but this was in the Mechanical Music Digest this Morning. Cheers, Dave McPeak   From: tps@chartertn.net.geentroep (Charles Dyer) To: <john@player-care.com> Date: Thu, 6 Apr 2000 11:45:46 -0400   Subject: Value of Wurlitzer Theatre Organ   Hello,   I have recently purchased a property that has an old pipe organ and wish to find out the value because I want to sell it. The only knowledge I have is what the son of the deceased owner has told me.   He has stated the following to me. "The main part of the organ is a rank 5 manual Mighty Wurlitzer Theater Pipe Organ. The ranks include Tibia, Vox, Trumpet, Flute, and memory fails on the fifth rank. There is a borden rank for the pedals. This part of the organ came from the Logan Theater in Logan Ohio. ... he continues his father also acquired   a glockenspiel and an xylophone from Robert Morton Pipe Organ, a "toy counter" (various sound effects actuated by pedal buttons) from the McVicors Theater in Chicago, and a set of chimes, and bordon pipes for pedals from a local Tennessee theater."   The organ is in a fair state of repair. Could you please direct me to how I could find someone that might be interested in this organ. I am sending this email in hopes that someone might have a use for this rare instrument.   Thank you, Charles Dyer charlesdyer@hotmail.com   [ Forwarded by John Tuttle. Please reply directly to Charles and to MMD [ [ Theatre organs are a favorite of mine. Perhaps someone that [ participates in the Pipe Organ List Server could forward this [ to that group as well. Does anyone have any suggestions ? Unfortunately [ the number of ranks was not specified in the message... -- Jody   --------------------   From: pianola_shop@compuserve.com.geentroep (David Dibley) To:    
(back) Subject: Re: small pipe organ for sale From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sat, 8 Apr 2000 09:40:53 -0500   The Haskel- Estey connection:   Mr. Haskel designed and built both reedless (reed) pipes and = pipe-in-a-pipe basses- Haskel Basses.   The reedless reeds were successful but very soft compared to their real cousins.   The basses were good in that they conserved ceiling height.      
(back) Subject: Re: Tubular Casavant Trumpet tuning From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sat, 08 Apr 2000 09:51:54 -0500   Quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote: >=20 > In fairnesss, our Brit cousins used t/p action extensively for a very l= ong > time, and developed it far beyond MOller and Estey's modest work.   It is also unfortunate that American organ builders tended to follow German norms (such as Steere's espousal of Carl Wiegle's awful membrane action) rather than following British practice. M=F6ller's dreadful bar-and-membrane tubular action was one of the worst mechanisms ever constructed, and since thousands of them were produced, the disrepute they brought on the pipe organ industry may have been a factor in the subsequent growth of the popularity of electronic substitutes. By contrast, though only a few of them were ever built, the handful of pitman tubular M=F6llers built around the end of World War I proved very satisfactory, though M=F6ller only built them for a few months before standardizing on electro-pneumatic pitman actions.   John Speller  
(back) Subject: Re: The Haskell / Estey connection From: <TRACKELECT@cs.com> Date: Sat, 8 Apr 2000 11:01:29 EDT   I was well aware of the reedless reeds and Haskell basses and was = surprised to find that the 1895 Haskell I have been working on had neither. The oboe = is a real one complete with a removable panel to get to the wires and the 8' string has Quintendena basses. What I am curious about is when did Haskell =   take up with Estey, and why? He seemed to be building perfectly good = organs on his own. I have no time to get to the main branch of the library to = look up Osche's book - Easter approacheth.   Alan B  
(back) Subject: Re: Tubular Casavant Trumpet tuning From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sat, 08 Apr 2000 11:58:11 -0500   Quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote: >=20 > In fairnesss, our Brit cousins used t/p action extensively for a very l= ong > time, and developed it far beyond MOller and Estey's modest work.   It is also unfortunate that American organ builders tended to follow German norms (such as Steere's espousal of Carl Wiegle's awful membrane action) rather than following British practice. Furthermore, M=F6ller's dreadful bar-and-membrane tubular action was one of the worst mechanisms ever constructed, and since thousands of them were produced, the disrepute they brought on the pipe organ industry may have been a factor in the subsequent growth of the popularity of electronic substitutes.=20 By contrast, though only a few of them were ever built, the handful of pitman tubular M=F6llers built around the end of World War I proved very satisfactory, though M=F6ller only built them for a few months before standardizing on electro-pneumatic pitman actions.   John Speller  
(back) Subject: Re: The Haskell / Estey connection From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sat, 08 Apr 2000 20:00:06 -0500   TRACKELECT@cs.com wrote: > > I was well aware of the reedless reeds and Haskell basses and was = surprised > to find that the 1895 Haskell I have been working on had neither. The = oboe is > a real one complete with a removable panel to get to the wires and the = 8' > string has Quintendena basses. What I am curious about is when did = Haskell > take up with Estey, and why? He seemed to be building perfectly good = organs > on his own. I have no time to get to the main branch of the library to = look > up Osche's book - Easter approacheth.   After running Roosevelt's Philadelphia branch, Charles S. Haskell established his own firm in Philadelphia around 1880. His sons Charles E. and William E. Haskell were both involved with the firm early on, but William left the frim around 1900 and started his own firm. The original Haskell firm continued by Charles E. Haskell after his father's death until it went bankrupt in 1921.   William E. Haskell established his own firm in Philadelphia in around 1901 after leaving his father's business. It was William who developed the labial reed stops and Haskell basses. His firm was subsequently bought out by Estey, which is how he came to be working as pipe organ superintendent of that firm. Some of his labial stops such as the labial Tuba Mirabilis were developed after Haskell went to work for Estey.   The 1895 Haskell you mention would have been built by the original Haskell firm before the invention of labial reeds. I think the first of these was the labial Oboe in the early years of the present century, i.e. about a decade after your instrument was built.   John Speller St. Louis, Mo.  
(back) Subject: Estey oboe From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Sat, 8 Apr 2000 22:59:04 -0500   HI list, I have a 1905 Estey organ opus 290 at home. The organ has an 8' reedless oboe in it. It has a very bright sound and is constructed similar to a string pipe because of the roller in the mouth. It is not as loud as the usual oboe though. Gary Black