PipeChat Digest #1352 - Tuesday, April 18, 2000
 
Re: Palm Sunday
  by "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net>
RE: question to everyone.......
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
question to everyone.......
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com>
Difficult pieces
  by "Ron Reseigh" <RonRizzy@prodigy.net>
Difficult pieces
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com>
Re: Difficult pieces
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
RE: question to everyone.......
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: Difficult pieces
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Difficult pieces
  by "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com>
Panis Angelicus
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
Re: Les Rameaux
  by <dougcampbell@juno.com>
Re: Difficult pieces
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Difficult pieces
  by "Jason Comet" <diaphone64@hotmail.com>
Re: Difficult pieces
  by <Quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Panis Angelicus
  by <Quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Large Scale Kilgen Clarinet For Sale (x post)
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Difficult pieces
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Difficult pieces
  by <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: Panis Angelicus
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
Reality check [was Re: Les Rameaux]
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
RE: question to everyone.......
  by "Daryl Robinson" <darylrobinson@hotmail.com>
Re: Biltmore
  by <p.wilson2@juno.com>
Re: Biltmore
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
Re: Biltmore
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Palm Sunday From: "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net> Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2000 07:13:18 -0400   I did a Harry Vibard arrangement of Les Rameaux for the postlude--the blue-haired set love it every year.   By the way, there is no accent on Jean-Baptiste Faure's last name (it's pronounced "Fawr").   I had the great pleasure to do music by Faur=E9 (with an accent) for Palm Sunday; the Bennington College chorus came over and did the "Cantique de Jean Racine" and the Requiem, which made for a lot of music in the service. The minister cut his sermon short, and we only ran over about 20 minutes, which wasn't bad. The rough part was that the organ's (Wix, 1965) had just been replaced with Peterson electronics (not really playable until Friday afternoon!) and I didn't have a chance to rehearse with the choir- we got it together cold in performance. Only a couple of minor glitches, no train wrecks, thankfully.   Paul   >Carlo wrote: > >p.s. anyone play "Les Rameaux" by Jean Faur=E9 today? > >---------------------------------------------------------------------- > >Yes, I hired a local pianist to accompany me on the violin. This is the >first time I have ever played it on any instrument and found it a lot of >fun. It fits well on that instrument esp. in the violin's higher range. > >Has anyone Not hear Langlais's "Les Rameaux" for organ? ...... WOW ! > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org     http://www.sover.net/~popel      
(back) Subject: RE: question to everyone....... From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2000 08:15:39 -0500   Carlo:   I vote for the Yon, having just heard Simon Nieminski perform it last week to near perfection.   Peter    
(back) Subject: question to everyone....... From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2000 09:27:22 -0400   Peter,   You heard someone play it? COOL!!!!! Were you able to see him play it? I think pedal glissandi are so amazing! I'm getting my hands on Yon's 1st Concert Study in the near future, so I might have to add it to my list of difficult pieces.   Carlo  
(back) Subject: Difficult pieces From: "Ron Reseigh" <RonRizzy@prodigy.net> Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2000 09:48:45 -0400   Carlo wrote:   >Toccata on Thou Art The Rock.....Henri Mulet   Well, I must say that Thou Art The Rock is one of the most difficult = pieces I've ever *tried* to learn. The reason I've wanted to learn it is because = my father played it for many years. Played it absolutely flawlessly and = sounds VERY much like Virgil Fox playing it. (and if'ya don't believe me - I got tapes, man!! lol) Some people think it's the most obnoxious, most crude, and mjost vulgar piece written for the organ. However, I think it's FANTASTIC. LOTS of changes that take you through an entire spectrum of key changes. But, I'm still not finished with it, and I started learning it at age 16!! UUGGHHH!!!!   One of the hardest pieces I'm learning at the moment is J.S. Bach's Fugue = a la Jigue (commonly known as your grade-A, garden variety "Jigue Fugue") = Now granted, for my age, and my ability, this probably isn't the best piece to start working on, seeing as my sight reading is at about 0.1%, but I'm taking on the challenge anyway. It's an incredible piece. However, my dad has mentioned that the most difficult piece he's ever played and learned = is the Toccata from Symphony #6 - Widor, and I'd have to agree - just looking at the music looks like a roller coaster on paper!   There's my two cents in!   Ron Reseigh    
(back) Subject: Difficult pieces From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2000 10:06:43 -0400   Ron et al,   surprisingly enough, when I was learning "thou art the rock", I found it = not that difficult. I found "carillon-sortie" to be a real hum-dinger though. = I had alot of trouble with the Jongen toccata, and the Vierne toccata in Bb minor. The toccata in D by Lanquetuit gave me a run for my money, as well = as the toccata on "o sons and daughters" by Farnam. If we can talk about = pieces for pedals alone, then I'd have to list perpetuum mobile by Middelshutle = (or however you spell it), to be a real doosey. Although I'm about 95% done learning it, I almost ruined my organmaster shoes!   Carlo  
(back) Subject: Re: Difficult pieces From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2000 10:10:41 EDT   regarding "Tu Es Petra" by Mulet, you should come play it (or just about = any other piece for that matter) on the Shrine's organ!!! YUMMY!   Scott   (I didn't know your dad played the organ........)  
(back) Subject: RE: question to everyone....... From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2000 09:22:04 -0500   Yes, it was amazing. Simon played on a five-manual 133-rank organ placed = in four chambers at the room's corners. The console was in full view for the recital. He's one of those guys who doesn't appear to be breaking a sweat while performing, which is all the more remarkable to those iof us = watching and listening.   Peter   -----Original Message----- From: Carlo Pietroniro [mailto:concert_organist@hotmail.com] Sent: Tuesday, April 18, 2000 8:27 AM To: PipeChat Subject: question to everyone.......     Peter,   You heard someone play it? COOL!!!!! Were you able to see him play it? I think pedal glissandi are so amazing! I'm getting my hands on Yon's 1st Concert Study in the near future, so I might have to add it to my list of difficult pieces.   Carlo   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Difficult pieces From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2000 10:40:59 -0400     >surprisingly enough, when I was learning "thou art the rock", I found it = not >that difficult. I found "carillon-sortie" to be a real hum-dinger though. = I >had alot of trouble with the Jongen toccata, and the Vierne toccata in Bb >minor. The toccata in D by Lanquetuit gave me a run for my money, as well = as >the toccata on "o sons and daughters" by Farnam. If we can talk about = pieces >for pedals alone, then I'd have to list perpetuum mobile by Middelshutle = (or >however you spell it), to be a real doosey. Although I'm about 95% done >learning it, I almost ruined my organmaster shoes! > >Carlo   It really is remarkable how much we differ in what we find difficult to play. Have physiologists done any research, I wonder, on this question? Like Carlo, I didn't find "Thou Art the Rock" difficult to learn; but unlike himi, I find Mulet's "Carillon-Sortie" to be, relatively speaking, = a piece of cake. In fact, it's the postlude I am going to fall back on for Easter Sunday, as the one I was thinking of playing is going to take some more time. I agree that the Vierne Toccata in Bb is quite hard; I haven't learned the Jongen yet, but at least I can put my finger on what is hard about that one: that you have to read it through so slowly to make sure you haven't missed any accidentals; it's not intuitive, as the Mulet = pieces are. The Lanquetuit I learned fairly quickly, though with good slow practice. What utterly amazes me, given the difficulty of so many of the other pieces you play, Carlo, is that you find the Farnam at all a challenge--it's just a bunch of arpeggios (as I recall, though I've = mislaid my copy)! After you've mastered the Middleschulte, are you going to take on Sowerby's Pageant?   Randy Runyon runyonr@muohio.edu Professor of French Miami University (Oxford, OH)      
(back) Subject: Difficult pieces From: "Carlo Pietroniro" <concert_organist@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2000 10:43:59 -0400   Randy et al,   I don't find the Farnam hard now, but I did when I first started learning it. It was the 1st piece I ever played that had that much crossing of the hands. As for the Sowerby, I don't own a copy, but I hear it's amazing. I have a recording of it, but it's hard to tell how hard a piece is just by listening.   Carlo  
(back) Subject: Panis Angelicus From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2000 10:49:41 EDT   In a message dated 4/18/00 12:45:41 AM Eastern Daylight Time, = JKVDP@aol.com writes:   << Yes. It's sort of like Franck's Panis Angelicus - there are so many arrangements one really wonders how the composer wrote it. >>   There is no reason to wonder. It is a tenor solo in the Mass in A, and the =   canon, if I recall correctly, is with the 'Cello. In Rollin Smith's = wonderful "Organist's Book of Days," (published by the AGO), you will find this note =   for December 25th:   "Cesar Franck composed his Panis angelicus during vespers, 1871."   Whether Franck wrote it originally as a part of the Mass, or it had a life = of its own first as a separate composition, I know not. A few years ago, obviously 1996 or later, I noticed in a Christmas bulletin for St. = Ignatius Loyola in New York, the piece listed with the note "Sung on the 125th anniversary of its first performance in the Church of Sainte Clotilde, = Paris."   Those were the days! How nice to remember them thus!   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Les Rameaux From: <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Mon, 17 Apr 2000 19:55:35 -0400   I did check:   the copies from the Church Library are as follows:   Palm Branches J. Faure Arranged by Carl Bunche # 9678 Oliver Ditson Company Copyright 1913 by W. F. Sudd   These are the original copies ! Not reprints ! The price paid per copy was 12 cents !!!!!!!!!!     Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY     On Mon, 17 Apr 2000 16:35:38 -0400 dougcampbell@juno.com writes: > > In answer to Carlo's earlier question, The First Presbyterian > Church in > Skaneateles, NY DID do "The Palm Branches" on Palm Sunday as we have > done > every year, but one, since 1928 (at least) ! > > Our copies of this music are "very" old - and I will check tonight > on the > exact dates, etc. > > > Douglas A. Campbell > Skaneateles, NY > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related > topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >  
(back) Subject: Re: Difficult pieces From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2000 11:04:01 -0400   As for the Sowerby, I don't own a copy, but I hear it's amazing. I >have a recording of it, but it's hard to tell how hard a piece is just by >listening. > >Carlo > Unlike the Middleschulte, the Sowerby is not for pedals alone, but it does show them off considerably. It's available from the Fred Bock Music Company, in a volume entitled "The Organ Music of Leo Sowerby" (vol. 1), BG0879, which is very much worth purchasing, as it contains the lovely "Carillon."   Randy Runyon organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: Difficult pieces From: "Jason Comet" <diaphone64@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2000 12:29:30 EDT       > >Toccata on Thou Art The Rock.....Henri Mulet > >Well, I must say that Thou Art The Rock is one of the most difficult = pieces >I've ever *tried* to learn. LOTS of changes that take you through an >entire spectrum of key >changes. But, I'm still not finished with it, and I started learning it = at >age 16!! UUGGHHH!!!!     ******   I am 17, almost 18 and have learned the other difficult pieces. I am performing the Widor V (not VI) Toccata this Sunday (Easter). Mext year (when we have a new large 4 manual organ in the church, I will learn the Mulet. I suppose the Widor would be a great starting piece to lead into = the Mulet. I learned the Boellman Toccata (and the entire Suite) first, then the Widor, then into the Mulet. The Jique Fugue would fall under any of those. I learned that before the Boellmann but I found it easier after = the Widor.   As for the sight reading, Keep it up. I an also a pit pianist and a rehearsal accompanist. I can sight read the Broadway show scores better than any other trained pianist in the area. I have also conducted the orchestra while playing the piano several times, but that's all a = different story.     Just MY $.02 worth. Jason Comet note the change of address ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Difficult pieces From: <Quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2000 10:29:52 -0700   I find the Mulet particularly difficult because my wrists want to tense up = on the repeated chords. Anybody got any suggestions?   Cheers,   Bud   Randolph Runyon wrote:   > >surprisingly enough, when I was learning "thou art the rock", I found = it not > >that difficult. I found "carillon-sortie" to be a real hum-dinger = though. I > >had alot of trouble with the Jongen toccata, and the Vierne toccata in = Bb > >minor. The toccata in D by Lanquetuit gave me a run for my money, as = well as > >the toccata on "o sons and daughters" by Farnam. If we can talk about = pieces > >for pedals alone, then I'd have to list perpetuum mobile by = Middelshutle (or > >however you spell it), to be a real doosey. Although I'm about 95% done > >learning it, I almost ruined my organmaster shoes! > > > >Carlo > > It really is remarkable how much we differ in what we find difficult to > play. Have physiologists done any research, I wonder, on this question? > Like Carlo, I didn't find "Thou Art the Rock" difficult to learn; but > unlike himi, I find Mulet's "Carillon-Sortie" to be, relatively = speaking, a > piece of cake. In fact, it's the postlude I am going to fall back on = for > Easter Sunday, as the one I was thinking of playing is going to take = some > more time. I agree that the Vierne Toccata in Bb is quite hard; I = haven't > learned the Jongen yet, but at least I can put my finger on what is hard > about that one: that you have to read it through so slowly to make sure > you haven't missed any accidentals; it's not intuitive, as the Mulet = pieces > are. The Lanquetuit I learned fairly quickly, though with good slow > practice. What utterly amazes me, given the difficulty of so many of = the > other pieces you play, Carlo, is that you find the Farnam at all a > challenge--it's just a bunch of arpeggios (as I recall, though I've = mislaid > my copy)! After you've mastered the Middleschulte, are you going to = take > on Sowerby's Pageant? > > Randy Runyon runyonr@muohio.edu > Professor of French > Miami University (Oxford, OH) > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Panis Angelicus From: <Quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2000 10:43:46 -0700   Since the original was bound in with the Mass in A, it was probably a = substitute for the Benedictus of the Mass. If you'll recall, French churches in the = 19th century had a curious custom of replacing the liturgical Benedictus (which = in those days was separated from the Sanctus and sung AFTER the Elevations) = with a solo or motet, usually "O Salutaris", or "Pie Jesu" at Requiems, which = accounts for the absence of a Benedictus in the Faure Requiem. Durufle, of course, = includes both Pie Jesu and Benedictus in his requiem, so the custom hadn't entirely = died out, right up to Vatican II.   Pie Jesu, BTW, is the last phrase of the "Dies irae".   It may seem strange to younger RC organists, but with a silent Canon this = was the way things went:   The singing of the Sanctus covered the time between the end of the Preface = and the Elevations. The priest went right ahead with the (silent) Canon.   In some places, an instrumental or organ "Elevation" was still played = DURING the elevation of Host and Chalice; although it was dying out, I heard it in an = early ENGLISH Mass in the '60s at the RC cathedral in Toronto ... a marvelous = old three-manual Warren (?) tracker.   Benedictus was sung AFTER the Elevations, and the music was expected to = cover the time between the elevations and the Lord's Prayer. If it didn't, a motet = was to be added.   Interestingly enough, the direction to separate Sanctus and Benedictus was = even included in most of the CHANT books (where it was readily apparent that = they weren't two separate pieces) up until the revision of the Holy Week rites = in the 1950s.   Cheers,   Bud   ManderUSA@aol.com wrote:   > In a message dated 4/18/00 12:45:41 AM Eastern Daylight Time, = JKVDP@aol.com > writes: > > << Yes. It's sort of like Franck's Panis Angelicus - there are so many > arrangements one really wonders how the composer wrote it. >> > > There is no reason to wonder. It is a tenor solo in the Mass in A, and = the > canon, if I recall correctly, is with the 'Cello. In Rollin Smith's = wonderful > "Organist's Book of Days," (published by the AGO), you will find this = note > for December 25th: > > "Cesar Franck composed his Panis angelicus during vespers, 1871." > > Whether Franck wrote it originally as a part of the Mass, or it had a = life of > its own first as a separate composition, I know not. A few years ago, > obviously 1996 or later, I noticed in a Christmas bulletin for St. = Ignatius > Loyola in New York, the piece listed with the note "Sung on the 125th > anniversary of its first performance in the Church of Sainte Clotilde, = Paris." > > Those were the days! How nice to remember them thus! > > Cheers, > > Malcolm Wechsler > www.mander-organs.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Large Scale Kilgen Clarinet For Sale (x post) From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2000 13:53:26 EDT   Large scale Kilgen Clarinette (late 1920's) with timbre very similar to a Corno di Bassetto for sale. Formerly in a prominent R.C. church in = Detroit.   For price quote and further details contact Al Hunter at (248) 542-3353.  
(back) Subject: Re: Difficult pieces From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2000 11:19:59   At 10:29 AM 4/18/2000 -0700, Bud-at-the-Beach wrote: >I find the Mulet particularly difficult because my wrists want to tense = up on the >repeated chords. Anybody got any suggestions?<snip>   VERY common problem. For some, repetitive chordal figures, or quick repititions of two notes, such as in a long trill, cause the hand and forearm to tense up. One teacher I had, Dorothy Hester, recommended working on this problem by relaxing the forearm and hand, the slowly = trying the passage that causes the tensing, and then slowly progressing in speed until the tensing happens. As soon as the tensing happens, stop and immediately relax the arm and hand by shaking it. Keep doing this until you can accellerate into proper tempo during the passage.   I went through this same syndrome early on when studying organ, but never had the problem on piano. It took considerable work to break the = "tension" habit, and after I did, it was like knocking down a high wall that was impeding my progress. Some folks are blessed by not having this problem. They're lucky...it's quite something to try to "unlearn"!   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Difficult pieces From: <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net> Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2000 14:36:35 -0400 (EDT)   Maybe that's what the repeat button is for on the toasters? LOL   >>I find the Mulet particularly difficult because my wrists want to tense up on the repeated chords. Anybody got any suggestions?<<   Neil    
(back) Subject: Re: Panis Angelicus From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2000 14:56:43 EDT   In a message dated 4/18/00 1:46:47 PM Eastern Daylight Time, Quilisma@socal.rr.com writes:   << If you'll recall, French churches in the 19th century had a curious custom of replacing the liturgical Benedictus = (which in those days was separated from the Sanctus and sung AFTER the Elevations) with a solo or motet, usually "O Salutaris", or "Pie Jesu" at Requiems, which accounts for the absence of a Benedictus in the Faure Requiem. >>   It's kind of you to think I might recall it, but I can't because I never = knew that. I can't lay my hand on a 1940 - they are at church - but seem to = recall something odd about Benedictus qui venit therein, or perhaps it was the = old Canadian Anglican book which I used for so many years, also at church. In = any case, I have before me a 1916 Episcopal Hymnal, called "The New Hymnal," which I found in an antiquarian bookshop some time ago - marked down from $1.45 to $1.35, and there are no Benedicti in sight anywhere. Also in this =   book, as, I guess, in 1940, the Gloria in excelsis is at the very end, = which is where we used to sing it every Sunday in cheerful seasons.   Thanks for an interesting posting.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com  
(back) Subject: Reality check [was Re: Les Rameaux] From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2000 14:19:27 -0500       doug wrote, (referring the "Palm Branches") in part:   > These are the original copies ! Not reprints ! The price paid per copy > was 12 cents !!!!!!!!!!   As good as that sounds, remember that at that time a laborer was paid a = few dollars (at most) per week. As cheap as .12 per copy sounds, it was probably nearly an hours worth of work, or the equivalent of about $5.00+ per copy today.    
(back) Subject: RE: question to everyone....... From: "Daryl Robinson" <darylrobinson@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2000 15:42:59 CDT   Simon was just in Houston and I had a GREAT opportunity to spend some time =   with him and his wife. A remarkable person AND organist. Don't give him = nuts though!     Daryl Robinson   From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> To: 'PipeChat' <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: RE: question to everyone....... Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2000 08:15:39 -0500   Carlo:   I vote for the Yon, having just heard Simon Nieminski perform it last week to near perfection.   Peter     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org     ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Biltmore From: <p.wilson2@juno.com> Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2000 13:22:47 -0700       On Sun, 16 Apr 2000 23:29:40 -0500 "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> writes: > Any listers here know who restored the Aeolian/Skinner at The > Biltmore? > > I've got friends going there next week and they would like to know. > > Thanks, Rick > Where is the A/S at Biltmore? The famous photograph of the Library at Biltmore shows an impresssive fa=E7ade, but I was told that it's just = that, a fa=E7ade, that there wasn't a pipe organ behind it.   Shalom, Preston p.wilson2@juno.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Biltmore From: <DudelK@aol.com> Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2000 17:57:13 EDT   A little quick surfing turns up the full story, which can be found at: http://biltmore.com/just4media/organ.html   Yes, Virginia, there is a 2 manual Skinner in the banquet hall, and the = Sept 20 news release has all the fascinating details.   Enjoy.  
(back) Subject: Re: Biltmore From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2000 16:57:33 -0500   >On Sun, 16 Apr 2000 23:29:40 -0500 "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> writes: > > Any listers here know who restored the Aeolian/Skinner at The > > Biltmore? > > > > I've got friends going there next week and they would like to know. > > > > Thanks, Rick > > >Where is the A/S at Biltmore? The famous photograph of the Library at >Biltmore shows an impresssive fa=E7ade, but I was told that it's just that, >a fa=E7ade, that there wasn't a pipe organ behind it.   The organ is in the Gallery of the Great Hall. I don't think there=20 was originally an organ there but the facade has always been in=20 place. The current instrument was installed by John Allen Farmer,=20 Inc. of Winston-Salem, NC. It is not an A/S but is E.M Skinner Opus=20 248 originally installed in the Residence of Mrs. Cornelius Agnew of=20 Armonk, NY a a II/14 with a semi-automatic player.   David