PipeChat Digest #1357 - Saturday, April 22, 2000
 
Re: Ellsasser stuff
  by <FiveManual@aol.com>
The discussions are getting ludicrous!
  by <Devon3000@aol.com>
RE: The discussions are getting ludicrous!
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: Liberation
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: The discussions are getting ludicrous!
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Liberation
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Page theatre organs
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Re: Liberation
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
re: Liberation
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
Re: Liberation
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: secular organs (X-posted)
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
Is this still in print?
  by "Robert Ehrhardt" <r_ehrh@bellsouth.net>
re: Liberation
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Liberation
  by <PipeLuvr@aol.com>
Re: Liberation
  by "V. David Barton" <vdbarton@erols.com>
Re: The discussions are getting ludicrous!
  by "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Re: secular organs (X-posted)
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
T.O. Concert 4/28/00 Portland OR
  by <DAJAMES@aol.com>
Re: Almanac
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: Liberation
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Upcoming Detroit Recital May 5
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Upcoming Detroit Recital May 5
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
RE: Liberation
  by "Bert Atwood" <atwoody@ispchannel.com>
Re: After 1950 is scum :-)
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Liberation
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Purists (was Upcoming Detroit Recital May 5)
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Ellsasser stuff From: <FiveManual@aol.com> Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 08:19:50 EDT   I have most of these recordings also and when I was young I used to go to = the Hammond Castle Museum in Gloucester, MA, to hear Elsasser play the organ there. As far as his original works go, none were ever published because = most of them were simply on the spot improvisations. He played a few of them = often enough that he locked down an actual arrangement that could be replayed at =   will. I was there for a recording session when he created a selection on = the spot, recorded it straight through in one take and then named it later = when he was doing the workup for the record cover. He was an interesting fellow =   and while no great artist he certainly did inspire many people to become = fine organists. His time as artist in residence for the Hammond Castle was probably the most bizarre musically of his career owing perhaps to the = fact that the huge pipe organ there was much more of an orchestral instrument = than a real classical pipe organ. I spent two different stints there (89-91 and =   94-96) as artist in residence playing 14 concerts a year and a multitude = of tour recitals each time and I will have to admit that I found myself doing =   the same, using a lot of orchestral material rather than organ repertoire. = It just seemed to fit the instrument much better. It certainly fit the = audiences much better. Best regards, Mark  
(back) Subject: The discussions are getting ludicrous! From: <Devon3000@aol.com> Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 10:00:16 EDT   If the discussions continue as they are right now, I'm out of this list.   Mr. Foppiano's program is full of variety and will certainly entertain the =   audience, without the "dumbing down" of our art of organ playing. Like it = or not, the pipe organ is tied to history. A lot of the best music written = is "past music". It doesn't matter what the content is, it's the player and = the "marketing" (publicity, not dumbing down). If I am ever required to play rock music transcriptions to get an audience for organ music in a church, then it's over anyway. There will be another "big" position open, as many = of my colleagues have given up in the past few years.   And to be talking about a theatre organ without a tremolo and pedals is so =   ridiculous, and a waste of my time to read. Please carefully label your subject lines so I can skip this thread also!   Let's get real and talk about the organ, its best craftsmanship, and performance. Mr. Foppiano will have a large crowd, and not one will be disappointed in his performance, as he will have them spellbound. And he won't have to resort to musical "prostitution" to inspire others to listen =   and maybe study seriously the instrument they hear. And, of all people, = he could do the tangos if he were so inclined. I'm so grateful he has a = sense of quality as well as spiritual sensibility about sacred spaces, and he = might even have been requested to play most of those selections! We've had excellent audiences at Christ Church at our organ concerts. It's all in = the publicity, careful selection of date and time, and selecting the right "communicator(s)" of our high art. If we do otherwise, we're killing it = for sure.   Not a day goes by recently, that someone doesn't enter our sanctuary, and comment how "awesome" the organ looks, and how it sounds. We're entering = an era where a lot of people just haven't "heard" a pipe organ played by a = real musician. At a recent wedding, one of the guest musicians told me "It's = so great to have a real organist playing". There are a lot of organ players = out there. We need more "real organists" to communicate the best of what this =   instrument offers. We'll never be lacking for audiences if we work hard = at that. It does require a lot of work and sensibility.   Sorry to be so nasty, but I've had it with those who think we're going to save the organ by doing secular music in sacred spaces. Ridiculous!!! = God help us.   Devon Hollingsworth, in Chicago Suburb  
(back) Subject: RE: The discussions are getting ludicrous! From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 09:27:53 -0500   Devon:   Thanks for the reality check. While I would personally go to hear Scott play ANYTHING, my preference would be for the type of program he will present on May 5. While I cannot make that date, I do plan to go to hear him at the National Shrine's Kilgen in the near future. Being able to = hear a musician of his caliber in such a space on such an instrument is for me = an unexcelled musical experience. For all of the reasons you mentioned.   Peter    
(back) Subject: Re: Liberation From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 09:54:50 -0500     > >Like NASA says: Smaller, better, cheaper... this is the motto for >designing new pipe organs for public venues. Think about all >the places where the public goes to hear live music, e.g. malls, >coffee shops, beer halls, pizza places, anywhere the public goes >for mellow, non-hyperactive entertainment, etc.   I'm afraid, it'll never fly as long as the "must-be-historic(ancient)" = goes with it.   I suggested on Pipe-ARGUE _ L that an organ such as a theatre organ be enclosed in a movable trailer so it can be hauled to the sites where = people congregate. (Fairs, Conventions, picnics, parties, etc.). It met with = stony silence. I love organs in all their permutations as the greatest = instrument ever created by Man(and woman). But it appears that those in charge are unwilling to accommodate the general public, who makes up the audience, = who pays the bills, whose commn denominator decides the eventual direction of our music.   Wake up folks! The first rule of marketing is find out what your public = wants!!   John V   "still fighting..."      
(back) Subject: Re: The discussions are getting ludicrous! From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 10:09:40 -0500   Even regarding my earlier posts about trailering organs to the masses, I will absolutely admit that the classics in any from should be part of it.   Having said that, I have witnessed mr. Foppiano's playing in a secular as well as a religious setting and I can assure you that what ever he plays will thrill/ amaze/entertain/spiritually-uplift (pick one) you. His gift = is that he plays FOR the audience and not DOWN to them. There-in lies part of the appeal so desperately needed.   Go-get-em Scott!   John V      
(back) Subject: Liberation From: <KriderSM@aol.com> Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 11:49:50 EDT   One great idea that is coming to fruition is the installation of the beautiful Skinner in the Cincinnati Union Terminal. A Monday evening presentation of classical pops garnered over 1300 music lovers.   I eagerly await notice of their next concert. Perhaps Hector or Simon Gledhill could do the honors.   Stan Krider   dave_hat@hotmail.com wrote: <snip> I think theater organs were a good start but that style didn't get very far because it wasn't given wide enough play outside of the movie places, in the general context of public live music.  
(back) Subject: Page theatre organs From: <KriderSM@aol.com> Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 11:58:40 EDT   Page was built in Lima, Ohio, using mostly Godfried pipes. Page was known = for over-unification. Imagine, if you can, a 4 manual, 15 rank instrument with =   more stoptabs than (it seems like) than both Radio City Music Hall = consoles. Nice sound, and a most impressive console appearance. It is one of my favorite sounding instruments. I practically grew up = around the Fort Wayne Embassy Page Grande Theatre organ. Great instrument; = beautiful sound. ...but, oh, those rows of stoptabs!   Stan Krider     Stan krider     quilisma@socal.rr.com asks: "I don't know about Page ... somebody tell the story, please."  
(back) Subject: Re: Liberation From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 09:37:24   At 09:54 AM 4/22/2000 -0500, you wrote: >I suggested on Pipe-ARGUE _ L that an organ such as a theatre organ be >enclosed in a movable trailer so it can be hauled to the sites where = people >congregate. (Fairs, Conventions, picnics, parties, etc.). It met with = stony >silence.<snip>   Well....just WHAT did you EXPECT over there, anyway? LMAO!   >Wake up folks! The first rule of marketing is find out what your public wants!!<snip>   Well, part of the role of a good artist is to educate as well as perform. Certainly the literature of the organ holds many works that the public never really "wants", because they don't know what they are in the first place! Maestros and artists must rely on publicity to get people "in" to give a listen, but then must keep them there with something that satisfies their minds. Directors of symphony orchestras know this all too well; there must be some "play-the-hits" to draw crowds to the familiar, but = then expansion into th unknown has to happen once the public is in the hall. Organists, being their own maestros, have to think this way also, to be successful. Nothing is more disasterous than to properly promote a = recital on a fine organ to the public, attract a good crowd, and then euthanize them with a memory recall of all of Buxtehude's chorale preludes...in chronological order...or other such driv-VELL. Variaty is the spice of life, indeed, especially as it pertains to the patrons of musical = performance!   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: re: Liberation From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 11:43:56 -0500   "DaveG" quoted somebody or another:   >>However, no one is installing organs in department stores, shopping = >malls, >>civic centers, and the like, where they belong! Someone's got >to get >>things going in that direction. It won't happen until there's >public >>acclaim for it.   Dave --   There's a really ugly (but very effective) catch-22 here...new organs are built almost exclusively for churches because the churches are the only ones wanting to buy them. I heartily agree that it would be fabulous to see new instruments (of whatever persuasion) going into shopping malls and civic centers, but someone, somewhere has to commission such instruments before they can be built. Those currently building such venues are more interested in things that they percieve the public to want (any number of *other* gimmicks) and, unfortunately, they could be right. Those few public venues where new instruments are considered are usually provided with some cheap imitation, for the owners of the venues are unwilling to make any but the minimum commitment for something that they have little faith in the "public desire for". The "public" often backs them in this = by not giving a hoot one way or the other.   Pipe organs, by their nature, are exceedingly costly to build (even little ones), thus making it impractical if not impossible to build them "on speculation" that *somewhere* will be found to put it once we have it. = "If you build it, they will come" is a lovely setiment, but unfortunately not = a particularly practical one.   So, now we've cycled back to the beginning: where do we start to build interest in the Organ and Organ Music within the "general public"??   Methinks that such efforts must begin where the organs *currently* exist = -- which, good or bad, is mostly in the churches. If more organists were willing to try to actively reach out to the public with music/performance practices/publicity that actively try to break the stereotype of organs being "stodgy" or "religious"...perhaps we'd be getting somewhere along this road. (Virgil -- we need another Virgil!!)   We also need to vehemently promote and utilize the few "secular organs" that currently exist -- the Austin #500 thing in SF might not be the ultimate usage for that instrument, but it's better than *no* usage of = that instrument...? Someone mentioned the former Chicago Stadium Barton -- let us all also be vigilant to see that such situations that caused its demise aren't allowed to happen again!   Further thoughts, anyone??   Tim (who'd *LOVE* to build an organ for a mall or civic center...so who should I send the bill to? Volunteers??? <g>)      
(back) Subject: Re: Liberation From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 09:43:51   At 11:49 AM 4/22/2000 EDT, you wrote: >One great idea that is coming to fruition is the installation of the=20 >beautiful Skinner in the Cincinnati Union Terminal. A Monday evening=20 >presentation of classical pops garnered over 1300 music lovers.<snip>   A great, large ediface with a superb acoustic for the organ. Kudos to those in Cincinnati responsible for this enterprise!   Speaking of "trailerable organs", let us (or the snobs over "there") not forget about Reggie Foort's portable M=F6ller, which he dragged tirelessly over England in the '30s and '40s. It was a great part of the home front war morale effort for the Brits, and was quite successful indeed. Perhaps the acoustic into which it played on such mobile gigs wasn't ideal, but at least it was being heard! Now, it sits silent, mostly, crammed into chambers in the Pasadena Civic Auditorium. This isn't a bad venue, but there seems to be a lack of promotion and interest.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: secular organs (X-posted) From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 10:52:11 PDT     >to find out in 1999 that it was all a system for the Nazis to pass nuke >secrets back and forth between Berlin and Los Alamos during the hieght of >the Manhattan Project.   Really ?!?! Wow, where can we find out more about this?   DG     ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Is this still in print? From: "Robert Ehrhardt" <r_ehrh@bellsouth.net> Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 12:29:57 -0500   A friend of mine is looking for a copy of the volume "Virgil Fox - The Organist", published 1980 by Bradley Publications and is unable to locate = it anywhere. Anyone know if this is still available? TIA   Robert Ehrhardt Noel Mem. UMC Shreveport, LA    
(back) Subject: re: Liberation From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 10:46:27   At 11:43 AM 4/22/2000 -0500, you wrote: >We also need to vehemently promote and utilize the few "secular organs" >that currently exist -- the Austin #500 thing in SF might not be the >ultimate usage for that instrument, but it's better than *no* usage of that >instrument...?<snip>   True, true. It just seems that there are far better places for #500 to go into where it could attract a larger number of potential listeners. NO one's going to the Embarcadero for an organ recital, believe me...not without carrying an Uzi, anyway.   >Someone mentioned the former Chicago Stadium Barton -- let >us all also be vigilant to see that such situations that caused its demise >aren't allowed to happen again!<snip>   Ah, yes, the "Bellowing Barton", played heftily by "Ol' Nine Fingers" Melgaard. Hmmm...not the best organ nor the best player, but it was "out there" in public, and had a following! The botched Allen installation in the "new" Stadium, from all reports, sounds awful...all channels summed into one big monaural channel. There's a huge campaign now to get rid of the organ entirely there and go to canned music, =E1 la the happy-clappies and most baseball venues. I think such a move, even on the part of hockey fans, wouldn't have happened if the old "Bellowing Barton" were still there! One of the first things the dreaded totalitarian/Nazi Rupert Murdoch did at Dodger Stadium when he invaded there was to sack the organists and go to canned music. Dodger games aren't the same anymore...which goes along with their lousy record last year!   >(who'd *LOVE* to build an organ for a mall or civic center...so who should >I send the bill to? Volunteers??? <g>)<snip>   Also VERY true! Who pays?? Most shopping malls are generally administered by quasi-managerial snotnoses who want "cost effectiveness" to please their single-minded bosses and only like "alternative rock". Certainly, concerns such as Wanamaker's and its successor are rare, indeed. Hmmmm...it IS a puzzlement!   I do agree that *some* current churches do have show-worthy instruments and promote them actively. First Congregational Church of Los Angeles, home to arguably the third largerst organ in the world, has a series of recitals year 'round. Many are on weekdays around the lunch hour, designed so that nearby office tower habituates can escape for a half hour of a quality musical experience by noteworthy artists. (I still don't think they allow sack lunches in the pews, however!) I've noted over the years that Congregational churches tend to be leaders in this regard, even in smaller cities and with smaller, although always good, instruments.   For a look at some of FCCLA's leadership in music (and a look at one of their truly intimidating consoles), surf over to:   http://www.fccla.org/music.htm   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Liberation From: <PipeLuvr@aol.com> Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 14:08:56 EDT   In a message dated 4/22/00 9:57:25 AM Central Daylight Time, jovanderlee@vassar.edu writes:   > Wake up folks! The first rule of marketing is find out what your public wants! > !   Right on John! And we're not just talking theatre organs here either!   Bob  
(back) Subject: Re: Liberation From: "V. David Barton" <vdbarton@erols.com> Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 14:23:52 -0400   > Well, part of the role of a good artist is to educate as well as = perform. > Certainly the literature of the organ holds many works that the public > never really "wants", because they don't know what they are in the first > place! Maestros and artists must rely on publicity to get people "in" = to > give a listen, but then must keep them there with something that = satisfies > their minds. Directors of symphony orchestras know this all too well; > there must be some "play-the-hits" to draw crowds to the familiar, but then > expansion into th unknown has to happen once the public is in the hall. > Organists, being their own maestros, have to think this way also, to be > successful. Nothing is more disasterous than to properly promote a recital > on a fine organ to the public, attract a good crowd, and then euthanize > them with a memory recall of all of Buxtehude's chorale preludes...in > chronological order...or other such driv-VELL. Variaty is the spice of > life, indeed, especially as it pertains to the patrons of musical performance!     Bob makes a good point. Though no great fan of cutting edge contemporary music, I'm much more willing to give it a try at an organ recital where a free-will offering is taken up than I am to pay $50 for a ticket to hear = it at the symphony downtown! I do, however, take exception to his characterization of Buxtehude's chorale preludes as "drivel." Shall we, instead, say only that they're not generally to the taste of the average = man on the street. <g>    
(back) Subject: Re: The discussions are getting ludicrous! From: "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 13:32:05 -0500   AMEN    
(back) Subject: Re: secular organs (X-posted) From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 11:11:16   At 10:52 AM 4/22/2000 PDT, you wrote: > >>to find out in 1999 that it was all a system for the Nazis to pass nuke >>secrets back and forth between Berlin and Los Alamos during the hieght = of >>the Manhattan Project. > >Really ?!?! Wow, where can we find out more about this?<snip>   There was a rather complete write-up of this in the Los Angeles Times a month or so ago...including quotes from former Nazi officers and = scientists.   http://www.latimes.com   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: T.O. Concert 4/28/00 Portland OR From: <DAJAMES@aol.com> Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 14:46:01 EDT   The Oregon Chapter of the American Theatre Organ Society is presenting =   well known Theatre Organists Donna Parker and Jonas Nordwall in a Theatre Organ Pops Concert at 7:30 pm Friday, April 28, 2000, at Cleveland High School Auditorium, 3400 SE 26th Avenue, Portland. They will be performing = on our 3 manual 26 rank Kimball Theatre Organ as well as an Allen 311 digital/electronic theatre organ. Admission (donation) is: Adults: $10; children or students w/ ID: $5; with a maximum of $20 per family. For more =   info call 503-848-0677.   Don James  
(back) Subject: Re: Almanac From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 13:55:57 -0500   On April 21, R. A. Campbell, <rcampbel@U.Arizona.EDU>, wrote:   > Listers may be interested in this new Classical Music Almanac. Posting > historical events in classical music. ALMANACm-subscribe@egroups.com   Clicking on this prompts an e-mail window - is there some response that = one must make to "log on"?   Just curious.   Glenda Sutton        
(back) Subject: Re: Liberation From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 11:40:15   At 02:23 PM 4/22/2000 -0400, you wrote: >I do, however, take exception to his >characterization of Buxtehude's chorale preludes as "drivel."<snip>   Not "drivel"..."driv-VELL"! It's BrewSe's word...ask him!   hehehehe!   dB  
(back) Subject: Re: Upcoming Detroit Recital May 5 From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 15:02:21 EDT   In a message dated 4/21/00 11:24:57 AM Eastern Daylight Time, RonRizzy@prodigy.net writes:   << Okay - so if I came and did a concert on your organ at your parish, = I would not be repremanded for playing Scott Joplin, Joseph Lamb, Cole = Porter, Ellington, etc.? >>   Shucks, nobody's complained about the "Gator Fight Song" making an occasionaly appearance during the postlude (on winning weekends only). = I'd imagine we'd love it!   It sure is great being a chorister, so I can really enjoy the organ = playing (someone elses!! hehehe).   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com http://community.webtv.net/cremona84000/ALLHAILTHEPOWERand http://community.webtv.net/hydrant/TheBeaglesNest http://community.webtv.net/bruco/STORIESINGLASS  
(back) Subject: Re: Upcoming Detroit Recital May 5 From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 15:04:27 EDT   In a message dated 4/21/00 12:37:16 PM Eastern Daylight Time, desertbob@rglobal.net writes:   << All the more to further my feeling that we must liberate the organ from = the prison of churches it is now captive to. The instrument is capable of so much, yet delivers so little in such a repressive, politically-charged atmosphere. >>   Another problem is with attendance. So many people won't cross denomiantional lines for some reason. So many people only go to organ recitals at "their" church.   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com http://community.webtv.net/cremona84000/ALLHAILTHEPOWERand http://community.webtv.net/hydrant/TheBeaglesNest http://community.webtv.net/bruco/STORIESINGLASS  
(back) Subject: RE: Liberation From: "Bert Atwood" <atwoody@ispchannel.com> Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 12:13:34 -0700   > True, true. It just seems that there are far better places for #500 to = go > into where it could attract a larger number of potential listeners. NO > one's going to the Embarcadero for an organ recital, believe me...not > without carrying an Uzi, anyway.   I must disagree with your Uzi comment. Having worked at One Market for 18 years, I always found the Embarcadero quite pleasant and never felt threatened - day or night. I don't think it's the best place for the = organ, but if the organ gets played midday, it will surely be heard by many = people who would never hear it otherwise. Maybe a few will become devotees.    
(back) Subject: Re: After 1950 is scum :-) From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 15:20:33 EDT   In a message dated 4/21/00 2:58:57 PM Eastern Daylight Time, dave_hat@hotmail.com writes:   << At a recent concert Mr. Gledhill played a medley of Beatles pieces... Very effective! One of my first concerts on the small theater organ I described will include something by Tom Petty. >>   It is really interesting how much nice music was writtenby the Beatles in their later years. Some modern composers have written some really = beautiful music. I especially enjoy some of the soundtracks that follow films. = It's a shame this beautiful music gets wasted, since most people are leaving = the theater.   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Liberation From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 15:24:30 EDT   In a message dated 4/21/00 3:15:25 PM Eastern Daylight Time, dave_hat@hotmail.com writes:   << A small, Let's say $4000 organ of the kind I mentioned in my post, is exactly what is needed in these contexts, playing MODERN POPULAR music. = We have the technoloyg to do this but need to get away from this weird idea that however it was that Silbermann built them X hundreds of years ago is =   the best we can do. >>   Hmm... a $4000 organ..... let's see, that would be a bench, a pedal = board, and three octaves of keys!!   A well designed mechanical action organ in a mall would give people not = only something to hear to some really neat stuff to look at. The voicing = could allow for performance of modern pop styles. Casework would go far in attracting people to the instrument. Burying organs in chambers is baaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaad. People then get the impression that the organ = is the console, and don't develop appreciation for the pipes that make the beautiful sound.   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Purists (was Upcoming Detroit Recital May 5) From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 15:44:12 EDT   In a message dated 4/21/00 10:38:34 PM Eastern Daylight Time, KriderSM@aol.com writes:   << You cut out my precious Beatles compositions!!! The Melissa Manchester =   piece, "Come In From The Rain" still holds its own against any of that pre1950s Purist stuff!! >>   Actually, the post 1950's uck I was referring to is that composed for the organ, mainly. There is some good, a bit!!! Much late beatle stuff = was pretty good.   Could use "Come in from the rain" on the SUnday when we hear about Noah!   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502