PipeChat Digest #1360 - Sunday, April 23, 2000
 
Re: "Believe it, or Not!?"
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: organs in schools/Star Wars Music
  by "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu>
RE: Where to get Conn 652 Tech Manual
  by "Grandstaff, Larry P." <grandslp@smxcorp.com>
Used midi-equipped electronic organ.
  by "Hugh Drogemuller" <lon.hdrogemuller@wwdc.com>
Re: Used midi-equipped electronic organ.
  by <PipeLuvr@aol.com>
Plexi-glas Shades
  by "ldpatte@attglobal.net" <ldpatte@attglobal.net>
Expressions for organ cases
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Re: Used midi-equipped electronic organ.
  by "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com>
Re: Where to get Conn 652 Tech Manual
  by "Ed Brown" <edbroorg@webtv.net>
Gainesville Recital
  by "Bill" <WGWUTILS@webtv.net>
Hearing Protection During Tuning - Cross Posted
  by <PipeLuvr@aol.com>
Music List, Toms River (x post)
  by <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: organs in schools
  by <dougcampbell@juno.com>
Re: "Believe it, or Not!?"
  by <dougcampbell@juno.com>
cross-church audience building (was Detroit recital)
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
Estey pipe toe
  by "William T. Van Pelt III" <wvanpelt@erols.com>
Re: Hearing Protection During Tuning - Cross Posted
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
Re: Where to get Conn 652 Tech Manual
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Frank Zappa and Classical Music
  by "Jerry Ripley" <jaripley@lan2000.net>
Re: Frank Zappa and Classical Music
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Liberation
  by <MickBerg@aol.com>
Re: Estey pipe toe
  by <OrgelBozo@aol.com>
Design Improvements on the small theater organ
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
Re: Frank Zappa and Classical Music
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: "Believe it, or Not!?" From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 01:12:29   At 02:39 AM 4/23/2000 -0500, you wrote: >I meant to say, "...performer I thought _not_ to have recorded any= classical >music..."   Frank Zappa also composed and recorded an opera. He was quite an interesting fellow; grew up in the desert here not far from where I'm stuck...er, live...now. He HATED the musical "intelligentia", even more than I do. The Glass piece was an obvious rib at such. He also liked to lift hunks of Sch=F6enberg to use in his albums to show twelve tone's utter ridiculousness. Another great sendup of it was during the Hoffnung festivals in London, where Sch=F6enberg was disguised as one "Bruno Heinz= Jaja".   "Moozeek is obsolete...graph paper is essential now!" "...and every good young German composer is willing to schtick his schpanner in da verks!"   The Hoffnung festivals, I believe, are still available from EMI's catalog. The "Grand, Grand Overture" features a full symphony orchestra, the Albert Hall organ, two Hoovers, and an electric floor polisher.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: organs in schools/Star Wars Music From: "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu> Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 07:47:52 -0400     ----- Original Message ----- From: <PipeLuvr@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, April 23, 2000 12:23 AM Subject: Re: organs in schools/Star Wars Music     > In a message dated 4/22/00 9:13:01 PM Central Daylight Time, rringram@syr.edu > writes: > > > We've done the "Cantina Song" from Star Wars . . . > > Does anyone know of a source or the publisher of the Star Wars music?   That particular version was done by somebody in our studio. Warner = Brothers pretty much exclusively owns anything Star Wars-ish in nature.   -Rebekah    
(back) Subject: RE: Where to get Conn 652 Tech Manual From: "Grandstaff, Larry P." <grandslp@smxcorp.com> Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 09:00:35 -0400   Good morning Bill,   Try the following bookmark and I think the part number is 71314-066 & 067.   http://www.mitatechs.com/serownman.html#CO   Regards, Larry Grandstaff Pipe Dreams Farm     > -----Original Message----- > From: Bill Morton [SMTP:wjm@pacbell.net] > Sent: Saturday, April 22, 2000 5:17 PM > To: pipechat@pipechat.org > Subject: Where to get Conn 652 Tech Manual > > I have a Conn 652 and need a technical manual (circuit diagrams, etc.) = for > > it. Where is a good > place to obtain same? > > Bill > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Used midi-equipped electronic organ. From: "Hugh Drogemuller" <lon.hdrogemuller@wwdc.com> Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 09:22:27 -0400   Can someone suggest a good candidate for a used midi equipped electronic instrument suitable for "gutting" with the present tone generation = system to be replaced by a state of the art digitally sampled system.   HD    
(back) Subject: Re: Used midi-equipped electronic organ. From: <PipeLuvr@aol.com> Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 10:08:16 EDT   In a message dated 4/23/00 8:22:12 AM Central Daylight Time, lon.hdrogemuller@wwdc.com writes:   > Can someone suggest a good candidate for a used midi equipped = electronic > instrument suitable for "gutting" with the present tone generation system > to be replaced by a state of the art digitally sampled system.   Artisan has released their "ranks in a box" system which sounds pretty = good, at least on the CD. Check out:   http://www.artisan-instruments.com/index.htm   Good luck with your project!   Bob  
(back) Subject: Plexi-glas Shades From: "ldpatte@attglobal.net" <ldpatte@attglobal.net> Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 10:17:45 -0400   Are we talking about chambers here with plexi-glas fronts or are we actually talking about plexi-glas swell shades? The Gabriel Kney organ at Roy Thompson Hall in Toronto has thick plexi-glas swell shades on the Swell and Brustwerk divisions, with seemingly no ill effects. He was somewhat of a purist as well! This organ was built using werkprinzip (or is it werkprincip?) standards as well!   Dave C. London, Ont.      
(back) Subject: Expressions for organ cases From: <KriderSM@aol.com> Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 10:55:19 EDT   Maybe wagging Beagle tails? Stan Krider   desertbob@rglobal.net writes: << Well, OK, but you have to have expression in a modern organ, especially theater. >>   Bruce . . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles responds: <<Ummm. You need expression.. Paint a smile on the front of the = case!!>>    
(back) Subject: Re: Used midi-equipped electronic organ. From: "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com> Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 11:33:16 -0400       Hugh Drogemuller wrote: > > Can someone suggest a good candidate for a used midi equipped = electronic > instrument suitable for "gutting" with the present tone generation = system > to be replaced by a state of the art digitally sampled system.   Most electronics that are in reasonably good mechanical shape are good candidtates. I picked up a 60's era Allen that someone had already ripped all the electronics out of for $2. The only thing that you have to watch is that some of the cheap MIDI encoders (like PAVO's custom instrument) use a scan that assumes you can wire up the keys in a Matrix. The Allen has a common return for the manuals. Not an insurmountable problem. A few IC's on the PAVO board or a MIDI interface designed for organs will solve the problem.   Of course, the other option is that not infrequently a pipe-organ console becomes available.  
(back) Subject: Re: Where to get Conn 652 Tech Manual From: "Ed Brown" <edbroorg@webtv.net> Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 12:50:31 -0400 (EDT)   Call 800-457.4408    
(back) Subject: Gainesville Recital From: "Bill" <WGWUTILS@webtv.net> Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 13:14:06 -0400 (EDT)   Bruce: Heard the PBS radio (North-central Florida) announcement for your Stain Glass Recitals today. Break a leg. Bill (also in FL but not close enough to go and enjoy a listen).    
(back) Subject: Hearing Protection During Tuning - Cross Posted From: <PipeLuvr@aol.com> Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 13:23:30 EDT   I've noticed that many who have spent long hours "in the chamber" seem to speak loudly and give other indications of possible hearing deficit. I = would assume that prolonged exposure to pipes during tuning may well be a = factor, particularly in the case of higher pressure theatre organs. So . . .   What (if any) techniques do those who tune regularly use to protect their hearing? I'm kinda getting interested in learning how to do it for my own =   project, but certainly don't want to sacrifice the ability to hear and = enjoy the instruments for the rest of my life!   Best wishes to all, Bob  
(back) Subject: Music List, Toms River (x post) From: <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net> Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 13:47:11 -0400 (EDT)   FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Toms River, NJ 4/23/00 Easter Sunday   8:00, 9:30, and 11:00 a.m.   Rev. Bruce Quigley, Senior Pastor Neil Brown, Minister of Music/Organist Sanctuary Choir Schantz II, 24   Prelude: "Toccata" from Symphony V (Widor) Introit: "Salvation Is Created" (Tschesnokoff) Hymn: "Christ the Lord is Risen Today" (EASTER HYMN) Prayer Response: "He Is Lord" (contemporary) Offertory Anthem: "Let the Alleluias Resound" (arr. Mark Hayes) Hymn: "In the Garden" (GARDEN) Hymn: "He Lives" (ACKLEY) Choral Benediction: "Alleluia" (R. Thompson) Postlude: Improvisation on Thompson's Alleluia, Easter Hymn, All Creatures of Our God and King.   The Choir sang beautifully at all 3 services. They were a little timid about the Thompson, but they pulled it off nicely every time.   Happy Easter Everyone!! Neil Brown    
(back) Subject: Re: organs in schools From: <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 12:40:46 -0400       On Sat, 22 Apr 2000 23:48:16 EDT Cremona502@cs.com writes: > > Please, folks! Please delete the word "chamber" from your > vocabulary. > Closets, basements, attics, garages and coal bins are no place to > install > organ pipes. Organs go in cases. Even band organs are encased! > Bruce, Get a grip, will you please ???? In our church the choice is a pipe organ ina a chamber OR an electronic !     Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY  
(back) Subject: Re: "Believe it, or Not!?" From: <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 12:02:28 -0400       On Sun, 23 Apr 2000 01:12:29 Bob Scarborough <desertbob@rglobal.net> writes: > At 02:39 AM 4/23/2000 -0500, you wrote: > > The Hoffnung festivals, I believe, are still available from EMI's > catalog. > The "Grand, Grand Overture" features a full symphony orchestra, the > Albert > Hall organ, two Hoovers, and an electric floor polisher. > > DeserTBoB > CAREFUL, Bob!!!!!!!! you will get Charlie Lester all excited !     Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY  
(back) Subject: cross-church audience building (was Detroit recital) From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 14:04:36 -0500   Bob Elms quoted Bruce C: >> Another problem is with attendance. So many people won't cross >> denomiantional lines for some reason. So many people only go to organ >>recitals at "their" church.   and then added: >If we depended on our own congregation for an audience at an organ = recital in our >church, we would be playing for ourselves. Nope Bruce! We get 'em from = the >opposition!   Happy Easter, everyone!   I'm with Bob E on this one -- although there is probably a *very small* segment of folks that won't darken the door of any church but their own, I don't think that they're nearly as sizeable in numbers as Bruce seems to think.   We recently had a concert here in a downtown Episcopal Church with a large and fine 3m "French-flavored" pipe organ. The recitalist was a former "local-boy", who had grown up in the congregation of the large Baptist Church around the corner from the Episcopals. The Baptists do have a pipe organ, albeit an undersized and rather non-descript example. He chose the alternate venue, as his program was all French music -- very well suited = to the instrument.   Anyway, when concert-nite rolled around, we were all pleasantly surprised to find people starting to arrive a full 1/2 hour before the program began (!) ...and by start time, the place was nicely filled with people (at = least a couple hundred folks -- maybe more). One thing we *did* notice, = however, is that very few of them were people that we'd seen there for any previous concert -- or at any other organ concert anywhere, for that matter.   The concert proceeded -- lots of large, noisy (and rather familiar, to us) French works, played well, and showing the instrument to full advantage. Also a nice selection of "soft-and-pretties". The artist (who personally knew much of the audience) gave verbal 'program notes', in addition to those printed in the program, and demonstrated the occasional "sound" or "melody" to listen for. The audience ate it up -- applauding = energetically to each work presented.   Afterwards, we figured out the reasons for much of the (sorta-unexpected) large audience -- seems that "momma" (of the performer -- she still = attends the Baptist Church) had been working overtime to see that all her fellow Baptists knew about and were encouraged to attend the concert. Her work paid off "in spades". We joked amongst ourselves afterward that 3/4 of = the audience had never been thru the door of the Episcopal Church (but this = was probably *very true*).   The important part of this story -- they **DID** attend. And they enjoyed it. Nobody 'bit' them, and they didn't go directly to h*** for attending an "other" church. They might even come back in the future for another concert. I am planning to make a point to pass word to "momma" in advance of the next organ concert we hold there, just to see if we might drag a = few of them back again. I'll bet we'll get a few (at least) as long as (another important part) *THEY KNOW ABOUT IT*!!   OK -- so let's review...what do we do to generate audiences for our = instrument?   1) PUBLICIZE, PUBLICIZE, PUBLICIZE. No matter where they come from, people won't show up for an event if they don't know it's going to happen. 2) GIVE THEM SOMETHING "FUN" ONCE THEY GET THERE. Even if this means = that we have to leave our 'academics' for another time/place. Note that this does not mean "playing down to them" -- just playing music that is easy = for folks that haven't studied the instrument or its music to enjoy. Variety is the spice of life here, kids -- and there's plenty of variety available in the repertoire. 3) UTILIZE THE INSTRUMENT TO ITS FULLEST. Attempt to create programs = that will use as many different combinations of stops and sounds as are available on the organ (and yes, *including* the chimes!!). 4) DON'T BE AFRAID TO 'BEND THE RULES' (a bit). This particular concert ended with an unexpected encore -- a little piece by Fats Waller (yes, *that* Fats Waller), called "Asbestos". Nobody would have expected such a thing, but EVERYONE loved it!! They left in a good mood because of it!! Remember that "we" essentially *set* the rules...so why are we so afraid = to occasionally alter them?? (what's that old adage...rules are meant to be broken...? Is this not applicable to the situation??) 5) FOLLOW UP ON YOUR SUCCESSES. No matter what various situations might generate an unexpected turnout at any particular event, pay attention to them and attempt to see that those folks are again given a chance to try organ music another time. It seems sensible to me to think that if you send an audience home happy, that they'll be a little more apt to consider attending another, future concert. If you do/play something that is unexpectedly well-recieved, try to do it (or something similar) again in the future.   To re-quote Bruce: >> Another problem is with attendance.   Yes, Bruce, that is definitely a problem for us all. However, I do not at all think it is such a problem that we cannot overcome it. I've tried to present a few alternatives -- can anyone offer more??   No matter how many times the topic of audience building comes up on these lists, I'll not tire of hearing about it -- and I hope that, sooner or later, these ideas and many more will be implemented so that we all can succesfully preserve our instruments and their music.   *WE* all know that it's worth it -- now it's time to help the "public" = come to the same conclusion.   All best to everyone, on this lovely Easter afternoon!   Tim (who's still humming the Vierne Final (sym. #1) from church this AM -- and I bet I'm not the only one that was there that still is!!)      
(back) Subject: Estey pipe toe From: "William T. Van Pelt III" <wvanpelt@erols.com> Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 17:48:54 -0400   Dear Readers:   Would someone who has a wooden pipe (of any sort) from an Estey organ please copy from the toe of the pipe the patent information printed on it, and especially any patent number if there is one printed there? This is for a research project of the Organ Historical Society.   I have seen many of these but I've never copied the information. Now, I don't have such a pipe at hand. Thanks.   Bill Van Pelt Organ Historical Society    
(back) Subject: Re: Hearing Protection During Tuning - Cross Posted From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 15:04:53 PDT     >I've noticed that many who have spent long hours "in the chamber" seem to >speak loudly and give other indications of possible hearing deficit. I >would >assume that prolonged exposure to pipes during tuning may well be a = factor, >particularly in the case of higher pressure theatre organs. So . . . > >What (if any) techniques do those who tune regularly use to protect their >hearing? I'm kinda getting interested in learning how to do it for my = own >project, but certainly don't want to sacrifice the ability to hear and >enjoy >the instruments for the rest of my life!   This is a very important question. The fact that pipes are loud, = sustained tones at a single intense continuous high frequency leads me to believe = that voicing and tuning is particularly hard on the ears.   For my experiments with flue pipes I plan to wear thick foam earplugs. These tend to block out high frequencies much more effectively than lower frequencies, so when trying to adjust the relative pipe volumes this needs =   to be taken into consideration.   I am of course eager to build string pipes that give the proper harmonic content (spectral centroid around the 9th harmonic!) which run on lower pressure and aren't too loud.   I am 29 and have spent relatively little time listening to loud music, mainly because I have a lower threshold of pain than most everyone else. = If I have to be an environment where loud music is being played (e.g. Salsa = and swing dancing night at the pub with the "if it's not good and loud, you can't feel the beat" crowd) I always wear my earplugs. As a result of = this I always pass my hearing tests better than average.   Dave   ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Where to get Conn 652 Tech Manual From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 14:56:11   At 04:41 PM 4/22/2000 -0500, you wrote: >You should check into the e-org mailing list -- I bet someone there could >help. Unfortunately I don't have the URL handy to pass on...DeserTBob, = are >you around this afternoon??<snip>   Ooops! Missed this one! Here ya go:   EORG-L: A discussion List for electronic organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.gulfcst.com/eorg-l List: mailto:eorg-l@lists.gulfcst.com Administration: mailto:admin-eorg-l@gulfcst.com Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@lists.gulfcst.com   Lotsa Conn people on this list with good tidbits, as well as Allen and Rodgers folks. A good group, and it's free of the "pipes vs. toaster" bullroar. You'll find lots of info about your 652 there; all you have to do is ask.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Frank Zappa and Classical Music From: "Jerry Ripley" <jaripley@lan2000.net> Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 15:07:07 -0700   No one should be surprised to find Zappa associated with classical music. Back in the early 70's when I was in high school, I was studying organ = with Doc Blanchard at Pomona College. Blanchard was the college organist and organist at Claremont UCC. Not only a grand classical musician, but a wonderful theater organist as well. Sorry, I digress... One used to see Zappa around Pomona College quite regularly.   At that time, Zappa was studying composition with Karl Kohn there at = Pomona. He was the only student of Kohn's who had the gumption to turn in his composition assignments in ink, not pencil! Very self assured, he was.     Chag Sameach [re: Passover], and Happy Easter, y'all!   Jerry Ripley Congregation Emanu El & First Congregational UCC San Bernardino, California      
(back) Subject: Re: Frank Zappa and Classical Music From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 15:45:06   At 03:07 PM 4/23/2000 -0700, you wrote: >At that time, Zappa was studying composition with Karl Kohn there at= Pomona. >He was the only student of Kohn's who had the gumption to turn in his >composition assignments in ink, not pencil! Very self assured, he= was.<snip>   ....and pretty darned smart, too. Time will show Zappa to be head and shoulders above anyone else in the "rock" crowd in terms of musical ability and knowledge.   Local question: Who's playing at First Congo/UCC in Riverside now? I harken from the days when Gerard Faber was there. Dorothy Hester was at First Methodist on Brockton Ave. on their =C6-S, and Dale Wood was down the street at a Lutheran/LCA that I can't remember. Dale also played three nights a week at the La Paloma Restaurant on 8th St. on a Gulbransen Rialto K and was a pretty good theater organist in his own right. I can't for the life of me remember who was at Calvery Presby next to the hospital on that M=F6ller. Trinity Lutheran, down Brockton Ave. the other way, had just installed an Abbott & Sieker in a truly dead, dead room, and Gerard played the dedicatory recital, if I remember right. He was dean of the Riverside-San Bernardino Chapter at the time, after Dorothy had it.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Liberation From: <MickBerg@aol.com> Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 19:04:30 EDT   I received the Pfeifenorgal CD yesterday, (thank you) and couldn't resist =   having a listen, just with Vienna for now, I'll wait a bit before doing anything with it. How I wish the other stuff on the CD wasn't in German! I =   would love to know what he is saying. I can't remember any of my schoolboy =   German, and there are probably lots of new Techno words in there.   It sounds very nice, I must say. I will certainly buy it. If you can = direct me at all as to how to get it, and pay for it, I would be grateful.   I noticed that some ranks seem to change very noticeably at certain = points. These points are where the sample changes. Listen to the Prinzipal 8' , between A and Ab below middle C. And the same thing between F and F# above =   Middle C. Another very noticeable one is between Eb and D below middle C = in the Krummhorn 8' bar. (what does "bar" mean?) The change seems too exaggerated to me. But in the Quintadena there is very litle change in the =   sound when the sample changes. What do you think?   And, how do you do those nice screen captures?   I finished putting the MIDI interface into the console today. (For notes that is, I haven't done the stops yet.) It all worked first time with my yucky-sounding MT32. The computer will be in there in a couple of days! = Can't wait!   What do I owe you for the CD rom?   Mick.  
(back) Subject: Re: Estey pipe toe From: <OrgelBozo@aol.com> Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 19:34:33 EDT   Dear Bill,   The Estey opus 357 toe says "PAT'D AUG 9, 1898" and doesn't list the = actual patent number. Perhaps this, together with the Tracker article on organ patents, will lead you to the patent number.   Best regards, Beauxeau d'Orgue  
(back) Subject: Design Improvements on the small theater organ From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 16:35:52 PDT   Hi Everyone,   I posted some info about a small theater organ I hope to build one of these days to this list. Based on your input it has changed a little. this instrument is ideal for public installation where space and audience attention is at a premium.   3 ranks, 4 manuals, no pedal, unenclosed, 30 combination pistons, = fully programmable. No more than _2_ ranks may have their largest pipe longer = than 4' physical length   Ranks:   name pipes playable at notes ---- ----- ----------- ----- Gemshorn 85 8',4',2' fairly conical, weak even partials, wide scale -> fluty   Violin 73 8' (from low C only) 4', 2' narrow scale   Cornett 73 8', 4' reedless 'reed' pipes, horn timbre   The "test suite" of representative pieces that this instrument was = designed play well:   * J. S. Bach's 3 part inventions * Francisco Canaro's Argentine tangos * Tom Petty's 80's rock (esp. "Mary Jane's Last Dance" and other melodic works) * The theme music from the Indiana Jones movies and other works by John Williams * Joplin's "Augustan Club Waltzes" and similar works   Comments on previous design proposal: =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D   >Hi Dave - >Couldn't pass this one up! >8' Tibia unified at 16TC,8,5 1/3, 4, 2 2/3, 2, 1 3/5, 1 >8' Vox Humana at 16TC, 8, 4, >8' Salicional at 16TC, 8, 4, (and maybe even 2' fifteeth!)   First, why do you like the vox humana so much as to include it in a small instrument?   I don't include mutations because unless they are not unified they are perforce equal-tempered and not true harmonics. Yuck!   >Hmmmm. a three stop theatre organ. I would do: >Tibia 16 (tc) 8 4 2-2/3 2 1-3/5 1 >Viole de orchestre 16 (tc) 8 4 2-2/3 2 >Oboe & Clarinet -- Oboe 16 (tc) 8 and Clarinet 8 from mid-c   This design is not that far off from my 'final answer' but has those mutation stops.   >since there can be a compound stop... >Tibia >Vox de strings IX   What's that????   >Kinuras au d'bazoooo   What's that????   >Just curious, a theatre organ with NO TREMS???   Nope! mechanism is too complex, and it just drives me crazy to hear organists overuse the tremulant. This is my classical bias showing through, the wobbly tremulant is the worst feature of the standard theater organ, it is an attempt to get the instrument to do something it's not suited for doing.   I hear thick tremulant and I think, "soap opera." And I'm a fan of the instrument!   If you need a tremulant it means that the music is too slow and dull to work well on the organ, or your pipes are badly voiced so that their steady tone has to be disguised by all that acoustical squirming.   > ....no swell shade pedal to keep time with???   Nope! Too small an instrument for this.   >....no second touch????? ...no percussion???   ditto.   > ....no pedal board to keep the left foot busy???   Or both busy if you're playing Bach or Widor. Nah, too small an instrument for that.   Dave   (further flames, comments, etc welcome.)   ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Frank Zappa and Classical Music From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 16:32:37   At 03:45 PM 4/23/2000, Dummy Me wrote: >...and pretty darned smart, too.<snip>   Well, >>I<< sure wasn't very smart!! That was supposed to be off-list. = My apologies!   dB