PipeChat Digest #1366 - Thursday, April 27, 2000
 
Re: cross-church audience building (was Detroit recital)
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
Re: Ellsasser stuff
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Hearing Protection During Tuning - Cross Posted
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Searching for Rossini Score
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Re: Ellsasser stuff, Christmas
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Wurlitzer Valves
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: cross-church audience building (was Detroit recital)
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
multi-use of church buildings
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Hearing Protection During Tuning - Cross Posted
  by "Nelson And Tracy Denton" <ndenton@cgocable.net>
Felix Hell in concert in Arkansas (X- posted)
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
Re: Ellsasser stuff, Christmas
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Ellsasser stuff, Christmas
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: multi-use of church buildings
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Ellsasser stuff, Christmas
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: Ellsasser stuff, Christmas
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Ellsasser stuff, Christmas
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Ellsasser stuff, Christmas
  by "Arno Schuh" <arno.schuh@in-trier.de>
Re: multi-use of church buildings
  by "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com>
Re: Marcel Dupr=E9 and John Scott
  by "Dr. Darryl Miller" <organdok@safari.net>
Re: Who was at the Coral Ridge organ last Sunday?
  by "Dr. Darryl Miller" <organdok@safari.net>
Re: multi-use of church buildings
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: multi-use of church buildings
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
A Serious Question
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: cross-church audience building (was Detroit recital) From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Thu, 27 Apr 2000 09:14:42 EDT   In a message dated 4/24/00 10:54:35 PM Eastern Daylight Time, Cremona502@cs.com writes:   << I've always wanted to try a wine and cheese buffet, but haven't found a =   church that will let us eat in the nave. When I was at UHouston, for organ class we would set up a table in the front of the chapel (where everyone sat) and put a platter of Subway sandwiches and other goodies out. THen we would eat and listen and eat and listen..... it was great. >>   During the years in which I was spending almost as much time in England as = I was in Canada (where I lived for 17 years), I was a regular at a wonderful =   London church called St. Olive's (Olaf), Hart Street, much beloved of = Samuel Pepys, amongst many. Twice each week, this church presented a noon = concert, only once that I can recall having anything to do with the Compton = Extension organ in its gallery. The vicar was well-connected to the Royal College of =   Music, I forget how, and invited music students to come to the church to = play or sing their graduation concerts (and other concerts) over for a live audience, before the final presentation at the college. We heard some glorious music, featuring many different instruments, including the = splendid concert grand at the front of the church. At these concerts, a hot lunch = was served from a make-shift kitchen in the back of the church. The menu never =   varied - Curried Spaghetti (that's right), a grilled cheese sandwich, = ginger cake, and coffee or tea, all for 50p. The vicar's wife produced this twice =   weekly for many years. The backs of all the pews had a flat surface, = perhaps six or eight inches deep, accommodating a book rack arrangement, but = perfect for use as a table. The food was all designed for quiet eating. The only sounds heard, in competition with the music, were the occasional scrape of = a fork on a plate (real plates), and the loud clink of 50p coins. When the vicar finally retired, there was a great Sunday morning Eucharist, sung by = a great number of former choristers at the church, and the service was = followed by a elegant party. I was able to be there for all this, and finally got = up into the organ loft where, stacked behind the bench, were huge tins of = curry powder!!   For all of our American sanctimony about our churches, and the feeling in many places that we ought not to be eating in them, lots of Engish parish church congregations, lacking elegant parish halls, or often having a = church hall down the road and around the corner, happily munch away at coffee = hour (sometimes with Sherry) at the back of the church after service, without = any thought of desecration.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Ellsasser stuff From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Thu, 27 Apr 2000 08:15:33 -0500   I too found some Ellsasser stuff- on a Baldwin....(belch-urp).......Orgasonic. SORRY BRUCE!!!   Theatre organ stylings on such ditties as Celery Stalks At Midnight....hmmm....and many Leroy Anderson toe-tappers.   I have (thanks to a PipeChat member) a tape of Ell playing Widors 5th Symphony at Hammond Castle. If that don't getchya up and goin' nothing = will- well, maybe Geritol!   An aged friend transcribed (years ago) Fritz Kreisler music for Mr. Ellsasser in his college days- I think they were dorm-mates.   Mr. Ellsasser was a unique talent- another one out of his own time- whose life was ended tragically.   I hope one can still hear echoes of Mr. Ellsassers playing at Hammond Castle.   Rick        
(back) Subject: Re: Hearing Protection During Tuning - Cross Posted From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Thu, 27 Apr 2000 08:22:02 -0500   Having spent time in swell boxes tuning....and playing calliopes.... my = ears go buzzing and ones' balance is temporarilly impaired.   Swimmers' ear plugs or speakerless head phones help a great deal.   What hurts me most in tuning are the (dog) whistles- maybe I'll start howling one of these days- and the post horn on an installation I did.   Taking intermittant breaks while tuning helps settle the cobwebs back in place- and then back in for more!   Rick        
(back) Subject: Re: Searching for Rossini Score From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Thu, 27 Apr 2000 11:01:36 EDT   Did you try Burt & Co? He always comes through for me.   <A HREF=3D"http://www.burtnco.com/">Burt & Company Discount Music = Supply</A>     In a message dated 04/26/2000 11:12:04 AM Eastern Daylight Time, Quilisma@socal.rr.com writes:   << It's published by Ricordi, and available at: http://www.boosey.com/musicshop/acatalog/Boosey___Hawkes_Latin_Masses_102.h= tml B & H is pretty expensive ... I'd check and see if Ricordi has another American agent. I had another edition at one time (I think), but it's = long gone ... perhaps Kalmus or Masters? Cheers, Bud P.S. - It's FORMIDABLE trash, but LOTS of fun to perform (grin) Patricia/Thomas Gregory wrote: > Greetings: > > I am searching for a score of the Gioachno Rossini "Petite Messe > solennelle". > > The accompaniment is written for piano(s) and harmonium. > >>  
(back) Subject: Re: Ellsasser stuff, Christmas From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Thu, 27 Apr 2000 10:04:20 -0500     > >Mr. Ellsasser was a unique talent- another one out of his own time- whose >life was ended tragically. > >I hope one can still hear echoes of Mr. Ellsassers playing at Hammond >Castle. > >Rick     Around 1962 I had picked up a set of Extended Play 45 RPM records by Richard Elsasser. It's long gone now, but I recall it being a Christmas collection. A title that sticks in my mind was something like "....funny red man on a big sleigh...". The pressing was HORRIBLE, surface noise drowning the music. I guess that's why I never kept it. Any one elso know any more about it? I did like what I could discern.   John V      
(back) Subject: Wurlitzer Valves From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Thu, 27 Apr 2000 10:28:59 -0500   Dear list members,   It's that time again to go to the well for info, or at least hope to get a concensus of opinions. As always, I thank all the resident talent in advance for all efforts and thoughts that go into the replies. Much appreciated!   I have gotten various opinions on the rebuild of Wurlitzer spool valves. We're redoing a 7 rank chest, and we'd like to do it right the first time.   The originals consist of the brass threaded rod mounted on which - in = order from the non-threaded end - there is a leather nut, free-spinning valve disk, felt washer, leather nut, leather nut, felt washer, same disk, and leather nut.   We found the space between disk faces to be nominally 11/16", and the = first nut sitting in the first thread. We also found that not all rods were exactly the same length; varying by as much as a 1/4"! Also that the location of the threads on the rods was inconsistent.   To completely redo theses valves we were told that it was better to use = new disks that are threaded on ratherthan loose-spinning. however these are thicker! Also if we add the nuts it leaves no wobble to help seat the valve. Is that really better?   Is the 11/16" a good dimension to hold?   What should the initial space between the top of the primary pneumatic and the valve disk face be ?   Where - in your esteemed opnions - should we purchase the proper parts? = P/N?   Should we try and redo the valves the old way? nuts, felts, etc.   Any other helpful opinions and comments would be greatly appreciated.   Regards,   John V      
(back) Subject: Re: cross-church audience building (was Detroit recital) From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 27 Apr 2000 12:36:05 EDT   In a message dated 4/27/00 9:17:10 AM Eastern Daylight Time, ManderUSA@aol.com writes:   << For all of our American sanctimony about our churches, and the feeling = in many places that we ought not to be eating in them, lots of Engish parish =   church congregations, lacking elegant parish halls, or often having a = church hall down the road and around the corner, happily munch away at coffee = hour (sometimes with Sherry) at the back of the church after service, without = any thought of desecration. >>   Shucks, we could really have great after church goodies if we weren't = saddles with pews and carpet. An architect once said that 3/4 of the number of people get lost in the parking lot on the way to the parish hall for = coffee.   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: multi-use of church buildings From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 27 Apr 2000 10:00:58 -0700   I was disappointed when our building committee opted for putting fixed = pews, etc. in the temporary church, rather than making an all-purpose room ... the = temporary parish hall (which will eventually become the kitchen ... there's a small = kitchen for the present) isn't going to be much bigger than what we've got now, = and we can only seat 50 for a dinner. Of course, we'll be on our own land, and = SoCal being SoCal, we can have larger events outside most of the year.   I'm of two minds about doing other things in a permanent, consecrated = church, though ... we do it now in the temporary chapel, and there's very little = sense of reverence when it's time to have the service. On the other hand, I'd like = to see the friendliness of coffee hour spill over into the service a little bit = more. Remember, these are folks who REFUSE to give the Peace at Mass ... God = FORBID they should GREET their fellow Christians DURING the Eucharist.   For that matter, I wouldn't mind seeing the Rector's sermons put into = practice in real life, but that's another story (grin) ...   I think it's different in big cathedrals, where you can have a stage and = concert seating at one end and the altar, choir stalls, organ, etc. at the other = and there's enough space to make a differentiation. Certainly the medieval = cathedrals were used for all SORTS of things besides services ... market on rainy = days, etc.   Cheers,   Bud   Cremona502@cs.com wrote:   > In a message dated 4/27/00 9:17:10 AM Eastern Daylight Time, > ManderUSA@aol.com writes: > > << For all of our American sanctimony about our churches, and the = feeling in > many places that we ought not to be eating in them, lots of Engish = parish > church congregations, lacking elegant parish halls, or often having a = church > hall down the road and around the corner, happily munch away at coffee = hour > (sometimes with Sherry) at the back of the church after service, = without any > thought of desecration. >> > > Shucks, we could really have great after church goodies if we weren't = saddles > with pews and carpet. An architect once said that 3/4 of the number = of > people get lost in the parking lot on the way to the parish hall for = coffee. > > Bruce > . . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles > Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com > http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502 > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Hearing Protection During Tuning - Cross Posted From: "Nelson And Tracy Denton" <ndenton@cgocable.net> Date: Thu, 27 Apr 2000 13:22:17 -0400     Nelson Denton R. A. Denton & Son Pipe Organ Builders Hamilton Ontario Canada   > Having spent time in swell boxes tuning....and playing calliopes.... my ears > go buzzing and ones' balance is temporarilly impaired. > > Swimmers' ear plugs or speakerless head phones help a great deal. > > What hurts me most in tuning are the (dog) whistles- maybe I'll start > howling one of these days- and the post horn on an installation I did. > > Taking intermittant breaks while tuning helps settle the cobwebs back in > place- and then back in for more! > > Rick   Rick makes some very good points here. As someone who services 1200 ranks! of pipes ( about the same as 3 of the largest organs in the world put together). and is responsible for tuning them all. I get dizzy and = deafened as well. I sometimes find that full ear plugs or head phones cutdown the sound too much and I miss out on some tone quality changes. Thus i often block only one ear- the one pointing to the pipes and leave the other slightly open. This cuts down the noise and still allows some quality of sound. I do have a few mixtures and trumpets that nothing will help!   Try not to stand or lean right over the tops of reeds if you can, keep = your head to one side or below the pipes. It can make a real difference in the blast effect..   Those breaks are needed by the keyholder as well!! Janine complains of "bench butt" all the time. For me it's the knees that can't take it any more. 4-5 hours of standing on one foot with your toes turned backwards = and holding the other leg up with your free arm while you tune with your = tuning wand in your teeth is a real killer.   Organ designers please note! Somebody's got to tune the durn thing! Leave some room for footholds.   Rule # 1 of organ tuning. If it looks large enough, solid and strong to hold your weight - it won't = so don't go there. If it looks like it's ready to fall off and a fly couldn't rest there = thats the only place to hold on so use it..    
(back) Subject: Felix Hell in concert in Arkansas (X- posted) From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Thu, 27 Apr 2000 01:24:46 -0500   Greetings, Friends!   It is my great pleasure to announce (albeit at rather short notice) that = we will be welcoming Felix Hell to the state of Arkansas for a concert on Tuesday, May 2nd. All are most cordially invited to attend.   Herr Hell will be playing the organ of St. Benedict's Church of Subiaco Abbey and Academy, Subiaco AR, at 7:30 PM. The instrument is a 1958 Wicks (3 manuals and 31 ranks of pipes), which has recently received thorough = and complete revoicing and tonal re-specification, as well as a completely new console and electrical control system.   St. Benedict's Church is a large and acoustically vibrant space, which showcases the improvements to the organ to great advantage, while also being a truly beautiful "visual environment" in which to enjoy good music. The console will be in full view of the audience for the performance.   Subiaco Abbey is also a truly lovely place -- well worth a visit -- even = if not for the chance to hear Felix play. Subiaco is located in northwest Arkansas, in the foothills of the Ozark Mountains, about 15 minutes (roughly) south of Interstate 40 at Clarksville AR. Anyone seeking = further directions is most welcome to contact me for more complete information.   I would hope for the chance to personally meet and welcome any fellow Listmembers to this event -- look for the guy with the ponytail!   Most sincerely,   Timothy M. Bovard Nichols and Simpson Inc., Organbuilders Little Rock AR <tmbovard@arkansas.net>    
(back) Subject: Re: Ellsasser stuff, Christmas From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Thu, 27 Apr 2000 12:34:03   At 10:04 AM 4/27/2000 -0500, you wrote: >The pressing was HORRIBLE, surface noise >drowning the music. I guess that's why I never kept it.<snip>   Ellsasser unfortunately signed with MGM Records in the early '50s and stayed associated with them years. MGM as a studio was never good at sound, and their record division was even worse. Noisy pressings were the order of the day. I recently "uncorked" an Ellsasser release from the early '50s that had never been played...it was quite awful! The engineering of the Hammond Castle recordings was quite miserable, also.   MGM held onto the old "45 EP" format long after major labels had abandoned it, so the '62 timeframe sounds right for this collection. Interestingly, Richard Vaughn's HIFIRecord label also provided the format until its demise. Various George Wright albums pop up from time to time on the "boxed 45" album format.   DeserTBoB   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Ellsasser stuff, Christmas From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Thu, 27 Apr 2000 15:02:19 -0500   Thanks for that interesting background, Bob!   John V      
(back) Subject: Re: multi-use of church buildings From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 27 Apr 2000 16:13:17 EDT   In a message dated 4/27/00 1:01:12 PM Eastern Daylight Time, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes:   << I'm of two minds about doing other things in a permanent, consecrated church, though ... we do it now in the temporary chapel, and there's very little sense of reverence when it's time to have the service. On the other hand, I'd like = to see the friendliness of coffee hour spill over into the service a little bit more. >>   People are yakkking and talking during the prelude anyway, they may as = well be holding a cup of coffee and donut! Actually, they'd probably be = quieter since most would be chewing! Reverence and appropriate quietness are behaviours that are learned in association with the particular = environment.   Many parishes would be much better off if they would building buildings = with a large choir area, much in the monastic tradition, and have an open nave area for use when there are more people present.   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Ellsasser stuff, Christmas From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Thu, 27 Apr 2000 15:14:06 -0500   Sorry, that was meant as a private reply!   John V      
(back) Subject: Re: Ellsasser stuff, Christmas From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 27 Apr 2000 13:17:49 -0700   I wonder if they couldn't be digitally remastered and cleaned up ...     Cheers,   Bud   Bob Scarborough wrote:   > At 10:04 AM 4/27/2000 -0500, you wrote: > >The pressing was HORRIBLE, surface noise > >drowning the music. I guess that's why I never kept it.<snip> > > Ellsasser unfortunately signed with MGM Records in the early '50s and > stayed associated with them years. MGM as a studio was never good at > sound, and their record division was even worse. Noisy pressings were = the > order of the day. I recently "uncorked" an Ellsasser release from the > early '50s that had never been played...it was quite awful! The > engineering of the Hammond Castle recordings was quite miserable, also. > > MGM held onto the old "45 EP" format long after major labels had = abandoned > it, so the '62 timeframe sounds right for this collection. = Interestingly, > Richard Vaughn's HIFIRecord label also provided the format until its > demise. Various George Wright albums pop up from time to time on the > "boxed 45" album format. > > DeserTBoB > > DeserTBoB > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Ellsasser stuff, Christmas From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Thu, 27 Apr 2000 13:30:06   At 01:17 PM 4/27/2000 -0700, Beach Boy Bud wrote: >I wonder if they couldn't be digitally remastered and cleaned up = ...<snip>   After some careful listening and "ear filtering" of pressing problems, I would judge that these masters, if they could be found at all, wouldn't be worth the effort. Much of MGM's record division catalog went to Polydor along with their artists after MGM closed shop in the late '70s, so they may indeed have the masters. It's obvious that mic placement and recorder overload distortion are major issues that a "remastering" can't overcome, usually.   I found his original compositions on this album, "Variations on a Theme by Paganini" (quasi-neo-romantic, and the same as what Rachmaninoff did, only Sergei did it better) and "...by Chopin" (quasi-modern send-up of the "Funeral March") to be of limited appeal and quality, anyway. What I did get out of the recording, if anything, was that the Hammond Castle organ does indeed represent the orchestral style of large organ specification, and does contain some very nice soft solo reeds.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Ellsasser stuff, Christmas From: "Arno Schuh" <arno.schuh@in-trier.de> Date: Thu, 27 Apr 2000 23:16:53 +0200   From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> > After some careful listening and "ear filtering" of pressing problems, I > would judge that these masters, if they could be found at all, wouldn't = be > worth the effort. Much of MGM's record division catalog went to Polydor > along with their artists after MGM closed shop in the late '70s, so they > may indeed have the masters. It's obvious that mic placement and = recorder > overload distortion are major issues that a "remastering" can't = overcome, > usually.   Okay, but what's about his recording of Widor's 5th? Its on Nonesuch and = not reissued on CD, yet, I belief.   Arno        
(back) Subject: Re: multi-use of church buildings From: "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com> Date: Thu, 27 Apr 2000 17:51:15 -0400       Cremona502@cs.com wrote: >   > People are yakkking and talking during the prelude anyway, they may as = well > be holding a cup of coffee and donut!   Without pews it took us a while to convince people not to start stacking = up the chairs until after the postlude completes.  
(back) Subject: Re: Marcel Dupr=E9 and John Scott From: "Dr. Darryl Miller" <organdok@safari.net> Date: Thu, 27 Apr 2000 06:01:18 -0400   At 02:00 PM 4/26/00 -0400, Carlo wrote: >concerning the Sketch in B-flat minor, Opus 41, #2 (written in 1945), I >don't find it difficult at all, in fact I play it quite often as a encore >piece.=20   If you don't find it difficult, you're one of the few in the world! It's a tough, tough, tough piece. The Dupr=E9 sketches and the Demessieux etudes or beastly. Do I play 'em? Not a chance.     >If John Scott learned it for a recording and has never played it since, it doesn't >say much about his endurance as an organist . . . How can someone be considered one of the world's best organists if they stay away from the difficult repertoire?=20   John Scott has EARNED the right to be considered one of the top organists in the world today. We don't know why he has stayed away from that piece. To keep the Dupr=E9 sketches and other pieces of such staggering technical requirements in playing condition takes a lot of time and dedication. Maybe he has no need to keep it in his current repertory? Do you know why he has chosen not to play the piece on a regular basis? If he played it once, Carlo, obviously, he has the chops to play it again and again and again. It, apparently, is a choice he made. I heard him some 20 years ago and will heard him several times. Always, always, always it is a very satisfying musical experience. He, as many choose to do, does not use the music to show off his technique, but choose to use his technique to give the audience a musically satisfying experience.   Just my 2=A2, of course.   Yours,   Darryl by the Sea    
(back) Subject: Re: Who was at the Coral Ridge organ last Sunday? From: "Dr. Darryl Miller" <organdok@safari.net> Date: Thu, 27 Apr 2000 06:34:27 -0400   At 07:43 AM 4/26/00 CDT, you wrote: >That was old service because it was Easter and now that other lday, not = sure >of her name at the moment, is there. Was listed in back of TAO not too = long >along.   I'm confused by Daryl's comment, but the Senior Organist of CRPC now is Rebecca Kleintop. One the broadcasts in the past year have been Becky, = Lisa Wilson, Tom Trenney, John L. Wilson, yours truly, and Diane Bish.   So . . . take your pick . . . they're all good . . . but of course, only the undersigned is considered the "best lookin' organist in the history of the world." So there . . . !   Yours,   Darryl by the Sea    
(back) Subject: Re: multi-use of church buildings From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 27 Apr 2000 20:14:34 EDT   In a message dated 4/27/00 5:51:20 PM Eastern Daylight Time, = ron@sensor.com writes:   << Without pews it took us a while to convince people not to start = stacking up the chairs until after the postlude completes. >>   Such eager beavers! I've worked in churches where often the postlude was =   ended in darkness, since it was the usher's job to turn of the "house" lights! Really makes one feel appreciated.   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: multi-use of church buildings From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Thu, 27 Apr 2000 17:35:34   At 08:14 PM 4/27/2000 EDT, you wrote: >I've worked in churches where often the postlude was >ended in darkness, since it was the usher's job to turn of the "house" >lights! Really makes one feel appreciated.<snip>   ....which is why I won't waste my time on churches anymore. They don't = care about you, so why care about them??   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: A Serious Question From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 27 Apr 2000 18:40:20 PDT     Hi All,   In the last couple days events have taken a sharp turn...   Those of you who are in the organ building business or have contacts in that business, please help:   If reedless reed pipes were to become available that had superior tone and loudness comparable with 'real' reed pipes, what do you estimate the profit for their manufacture would be, assuming one had the sole patent on the technology? How big would the market be? I need to know this before I start up a big $$ research project on this.   Dave ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com