PipeChat Digest #1369 - Friday, April 28, 2000
 
Re: Fw: A Serious Question
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Estey reedless reeds
  by <Quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: multi-use of church buildings
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Still not as good as the real thing.
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
exposure and Allens
  by <Quilisma@socal.rr.com>
reedless reeds
  by <Quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re:HUGE Schoenstein was Estey reedless reeds
  by "Hugh Drogemuller" <lon.hdrogemuller@wwdc.com>
Re: HUGE Schoenstein was Estey reedless reeds
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
National Shrine Kilgen Rededication (x post)
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
DUH- National Shrine Location (x post)
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Fw: A Serious Question
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: HUGE Schoenstein was Estey reedless reeds
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Fw: A Serious Question
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Still not as good as the real thing.
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: multi-use of church buildings
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Free Reeds, Reedless Reeds
  by "Ken and Chris Potter" <tracker@j51.com>
Re: Free Reeds, Reedless Reeds
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Choral List Info (x post)
  by "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net>
New Books at OHS
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
Re: why I don't quit
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: (or should that be "Was"?) Fw: A Serious Question
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Fw: A Serious Question From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2000 10:11:59   At 07:50 AM 4/28/2000 -0500, Veague wrote: >Back in the 40s and 50s, Everett Orgatron had their electric reed organs >with banks of amplified reeds. No resonators were used- just individual >pick-up mics on each reed.<snip>   Not quite. The Everett Orgatron, invented by a fellow at M=F6ller, who paid for it by being sacked, was built in the late '30s until war production limitations ceased production. The reed's sound was picked up by a flat headed screw charged with a fairly high B+ voltage. When the reed would vibrate, the capacitance between the reed and the screw would change analogously with the reed's vibration, and this change of capacitance would then modulate the high voltage, which was then decoupled and amplified.   >WurliTzer bought out Everett and continued the >instrument into the late 50s/maybe early 60s. >The tone was akin to an over-grown accordian and somewhat sluggish in >response.<snip>   WurliTzer bought out the Orgatron during the War, after seeing that would-be competitors to Hammond, such as Jerry Markowitz, Conn Instrument and Baldwin Piano, were all developing other purely electronic organs. Not long after WurliTzer resumed production in 1946, they made the reeds free running, eliminating the expensive pallets and action, and cut the number or ranks down to two or three. Prior to the War, Everett Orgatrons could be ordered with up to ten ranks of reeds, providing what most e-org builders couldn't until many years later...true ensemble.   The Orgatron was a fussy thing when it came to voicing. Very few people in the field ever got the knack for "twisting" the reeds properly to get desired harmonics from them. Also, proper air gap between the reed and pickup screw was a must. A properly voiced Orgatron with ten ranks was a formidable instrument at the time, indeed. One "defect" of the Orgatron was in its 16' ranks, near the bottom of their compass. When the note was released, the reeds would keep vibrating, slowly attenuating. Smart folks realized this was actually an advantage, as it provided badly needed bass reverberation time absent in homes, and also absent in Hammond's spring reverb system then available. One thing that would always give sluggish reponse and "accordian-like" tone was improper winding. Any less than 5" from the small regulator, and things would get saggy pretty fast. Properly regulated, an Orgatron had a response not unlike the average eletro-pneumatic organ, which, in fact, the Orgatron was.   Later "decontented" WurliTzers used free-running reeds and keyed audio, opening up the whole can of worms of "keyclick" that plagued Hammond from the start. WurliTzer wasn't interested so much in pipe-like fidelity as they were in profits, as their later reed models in the 1950's showed. WurliTzer dropped the reeds entirely around 1956 and went to cheaply made divider organs of notoriously poor circuit quality.   Laurens Hammond and his minions in Chicago in the '30s always regarded the Everett Orgatron as an intruder and a threat, but it was nothing compared to the onslaught of electronic competitiors that would challenge them in 1946. As if to say they had won, Hammond introduced a line of REALLY cheesy electronic schpinettes in the 1960's named...."the Everett"! They didn't sell much, and were quickly done away with.   DeserTBoB   =A9 2000    
(back) Subject: Re: Estey reedless reeds From: <Quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2000 10:11:32 -0700   Was the Saxophone in the former organ at St. Paul's, K Street (DC, now replaced by that HUGE Schoenstein) a lingual or a labial rank? I remember it being an interesting sound ... still can't imagine where they PUT all that Schoenstein (grin) ... St. Paul's isn't that big ...   Cheers,   Bud   "Weber, Richard" wrote:   > Estey made besides the usual Oboe, a Clarinet ( one of which I have > heard and is quite fine) as well as a Saxophone, among others. Richard > Weber Avocational (published) organ historian.    
(back) Subject: Re: multi-use of church buildings From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2000 13:26:38 EDT   In a message dated 4/28/00 6:58:36 AM Eastern Daylight Time, ldpatte@attglobal.net writes:   << I always thought one of the beauties of the Christian religion was that Jesus could reside in your heart, not in physical structures like buildings! >>   Unfortunately, this is the rationale too often used to justify/excuse poor =   social behaviour and lack of reverence. "God doesn't care" is one of my = all time unfavorites. God resides everywhere is deserves and even commands respect and honor. Part of our honor is the example we show with respect = to his holy places. This runs the gammut from littering a forest to = yakking in our worship spaces.   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Still not as good as the real thing. From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2000 10:28:44 PDT   > Added to that was the cost of electricity to wind >the beast versus consumption of energy of the Allen.   Once again demonstrating the need for inexpensive, "better, cheaper, faster" small _real pipe_ organs even for the church setting.   How different is one of these digital electronic organs, with output = through loudspeakers, as compared to the happy-clappies and their pretaped digital =   praze band music? Come on!   DG   PS: Please, I need feedback on the main question:   If it were possible to have reedless pipes produce reed tone of quality and power comparable with real reeds, how big of a market for such pipes would there be among the organ building community?   Thanks,   ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: exposure and Allens From: <Quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2000 10:31:54 -0700       Bob Scarborough wrote:   > (snip)   > The point to be grasped here is that the Allen franchisee helped them = get > this whole production off the ground and onto cable, providing the = church > with badly needed exposure with which to battle the fundies, and also > provided a quality Christmas pageant for viewers. Trust me, the cable > morons weren't allowed ot chop off *any* musical events, whatsoever! = Cable > TV as an industry is another thorn in my hide, but that's not important > right now. > > When's the last time you ever heard of a pipe builder assisting a church = in > such a way?   Given the precarious financial nature of pipe-organ-building versus the = high markup profits on electronic instruments, I'm not sure that's a fair = question. What IS the markup these days? Something like 1000%? I'm speaking of = actual production costs, not wholesale versus retail ...   > Allen continues to chip away at the smaller organ market, and > such programs as that which they sponsored only strengthen their = position.   They HAVE done quite a bit to assist smaller churches and amateur = organists, like their series of organ lessons for beginners on video tape. I have to wonder, though, if their library of canned organ music for SmartRecorder = isn't going to turn around and bite them eventually ... I can see church = committees saying "Why do we NEED an organist?"   > > Interestingly, the Allen fought a hard battle against pipes all along, > elders of the congregation not wanting "second best". Allen won out = when > it became appartant that a similar-sized pipe instrument couldn't > physically be fit into the building properly, and would cost more than > twice as much up front.   Probably for a very good reason ... a church seating 200 doesn't need 75 = ranks, equivalent or otherwise. Which takes me back to my earlier argument about = what the AVERAGE church REALLY needs in the way of an organ ... a diapason = chorus to lead hymns, some color stops under expression, a sturdy pedal stop or two, = and THAT'S IT. How many times have we ALL seen HUGE electronics go into = churches where the "organist" registers with the CRESCENDO PEDAL??!!   I've accompanied "Messiah" (without an orchestra) on a seven-stop = two-manual Estey quite Handely (grin) ... it didn't sound like a transcription of the orchestral accompaniment on a 100-rank Skinner, but it was clean and = bright and the choir could follow it. So the argument that churches who do oratorios = with the organ NEED all those knobs doesn't hold water ... aside from the fact = that they probably shouldn't be attempting them in the first place ... "The = Seven Last Words" loses about 50% of what the composer intended when it's done without the very colorful orchestra accompaniment, and in English ... "He = of death is guilty" versus "Reus est mortis" ... pu-LEEZE! Dubois was an = organist .... he KNEW how to orchestrate (grin).   > Added to that was the cost of electricity to wind > the beast versus consumption of energy of the Allen; calculations showed > that in that the Allen will pay for itself in a scant ten years at a > projected 12=A2/KWH, plus the lack of expenditures for frequent tuning, > always needed in a desert locale.   Rose fertilizer! People believe what they WANT to believe. If they're in = the desert, they're NOT in a low-income area. If you're talking about running = an eight-foot-tall high pressure Spencer cement mixer (like the pair at = Woolsey Hall) that's one thing; but I can't imagine that a modern silent blower powering a low to medium pressure small or medium sized organ draws an inordinate amount of electricity.   > I was told, however, that the final blow against pipes was when the = Allen > franchisee paid to take committee members to various Allen installations = of > various vintages all across Los Angeles County, and they heard for > themselves. Having played the new Allen myself, I must say that, dollar > for dollar and stop for stop, they did quite well. > > DeserTBoB   Now THAT I will accept as a valid reason for choosing an Allen ... the proof of the pudding is in the playing.   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: reedless reeds From: <Quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2000 10:43:05 -0700       "Dave G." wrote:   > (snip)   > Please, I need feedback on the main question: > > If it were possible to have reedless pipes produce reed tone of > quality and power comparable with real reeds, how big of a market > for such pipes would there be among the organ building community? > > Thanks,   Seems to me that the whole idea has been pretty thoroughly explored, and = for a long time, and the answer is "not much". Experiments have ranged from free = reeds to labial "reed" pipes to pipe-electronic combos with electronic reed = stops, all with pretty much the same result. Glancing through stuff I have lying = around, I see a fair number of organs whose original free-reed stops have been disconnected or replaced. I know that's not what you're talking about = precisely, but ...   It's kinda like the Holtkamp Polyphone, which was supposed to be a = low-cost substitue for a real 32' Bourdon ... they're interesting as a piece of organ-building history, but they never really worked. Most have been = replaced by the real thing or 12 electronic notes.   That said, if you have new ideas, then by all means pursue them ... = SOMETHING has to be done to bring down the cost of pipe organs if they're to compete = with you-know-whats.   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re:HUGE Schoenstein was Estey reedless reeds From: "Hugh Drogemuller" <lon.hdrogemuller@wwdc.com> Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2000 13:49:30 -0400   At 10:11 28/04/2000 -0700, Bud wrote: SNIP , now replaced by that HUGE Schoenstein still can't imagine where>they PUT all that Schoenstein (grin) ... St. Paul's isn't that big ... Is 54 stops , 61 ranks really that HUGE?   HD    
(back) Subject: Re: HUGE Schoenstein was Estey reedless reeds From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2000 10:57:41 -0700   compared to the 20-something Lewis & Hitchcock, yep!   Cheers,   Bud   Hugh Drogemuller wrote:   > At 10:11 28/04/2000 -0700, Bud wrote: > SNIP > , now replaced by that HUGE Schoenstein > still can't imagine where>they PUT all that Schoenstein (grin) ... St. > Paul's isn't that big ... > > Is 54 stops , 61 ranks really that HUGE? > > HD > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: National Shrine Kilgen Rededication (x post) From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2000 14:18:20 EDT   National Shrine Kilgen Organ Rededication   The 1933 George Kilgen and Son pipe organ at the National Shrine of the Little Flower will be rededicated on Friday evening, June 16 at 8:00 pm. There will be a ceremony of rededication followed by a comprehensive = recital by guest organist Thomas Hazleton from Allentown, PA. The program, which = has been planned to fully demonstrate the vast resources of the giant = instrument, will include works by Courboin, Taylor, Yon, Purvis, Elmore and Widor and = was planned to include repertoire by individuals directly involved with the original design, installation and dedication of the organ. There is no admission charge but a free will offering will be taken. A gala reception =   will follow.  
(back) Subject: DUH- National Shrine Location (x post) From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2000 14:27:16 EDT   The National Shrine of the Little Flower is located at Woodward Avenue and =   Twelve Mile Road in Royal Oak, Michigan, twelve miles north of downtown Detroit.   Scott F. Foppiano, Director of Music and Liturgical Coordination National Shrine of the Little Flower, Royal Oak, MI  
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: A Serious Question From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2000 14:20:25 -0500   DeserTBob-   Thanks for the history lesson on Everets.   My only experience with them was on the (used) sales floor. Apparently the ones we had were poor examples.   Rick        
(back) Subject: Re: HUGE Schoenstein was Estey reedless reeds From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2000 15:23:45 EDT   In a message dated 4/28/00 1:50:03 PM Eastern Daylight Time, lon.hdrogemuller@wwdc.com writes:   << now replaced by that HUGE Schoenstein still can't imagine where>they PUT all that Schoenstein (grin) ... St. Paul's isn't that big ... Is 54 stops , 61 ranks really that HUGE? >>   In addition, if it has slider chests it does not take up as much room! = Good design can overcome many obstacles.   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: A Serious Question From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2000 12:38:07   At 02:20 PM 4/28/2000 -0500, you wrote: >My only experience with them was on the (used) sales floor. Apparently = the >ones we had were poor examples.<snip>   Everetts didn't travel well, either. At over 800 pounds (more for the 10 rank models!!), they were known to crush floors in houses! Moving one would always entail problems with wind regulation and voicing.     DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Still not as good as the real thing. From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2000 13:07:03   At 10:28 AM 4/28/2000 PDT, Dave Gope-Jones wrote: >Once again demonstrating the need for inexpensive, "better, >cheaper, faster" small _real pipe_ organs even for the >church setting.   I don't THINK so....   >How different is one of these digital electronic organs, with output = through >loudspeakers, as compared to the happy-clappies and their pretaped = digital >praze band music? Come on!<snip>   A lot. They sound like organs, and play the literature of the organ quite well. OTOH, I doubt any 4 rank, 4 manual, no pedal aberration can compete tonally or musically in any fashion with much of anything!   >PS: Please, I need feedback on the main question:   > If it were possible to have reedless pipes produce reed tone of > quality and power comparable with real reeds, how big of a market > for such pipes would there be among the organ building community?   Who's being the "poseur" now? Reedless reeds generally sound like poor imitations of the real deal, much like the Hammond and early electornics did. If you knew much about pipe structure and tonal formants, as well as what the harmonic spectra of various stops, you'd know rather quickly that a beating reed, coupled with the appropriate resonator, can produce upper partials many times greater in amplitude than even the skinniest, hardest-blown string. There's no way to imitate the "blat" of a loud chorus reed with a flue, either. The initial partial presentation and ending decay are completely different.   In case you're wondering, the Allen people have been studying these criteria since the early '50s. I'd daresay Allen's factory voicers, along with some other quite accomplished folks in the e-org business, know more technically about what makes stops sound like various stops than some pipe builders do!   Sorry, this one's a loser.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: multi-use of church buildings From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2000 13:21:41   At 11:32 AM 4/28/2000 -0500, Russ Green wrote: > >Pity,   None wanted or accepted. If I wanted a "pity party", there are far better places to throw one than in here!   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Free Reeds, Reedless Reeds From: "Ken and Chris Potter" <tracker@j51.com> Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2000 16:36:25 -0400   on 4/28/00 1:12 PM, PipeChat at Bud wrote:   > I think we're confusing a couple of things here ... free (harmonium) = reeds > were > indeed used in pipe organs for various purposes ... if I remember = correctly, > years ago St. Mary-the-Virgin in NYC had a knob for a free-reed 32' = Euphonium > (long since disconnected, or never installed in the first place ... it = wasn't > playing when I played the organ in the '60s);     I sang in the choir at Smoky Mary's in the sixties during the Palsgrove/Robinson era and indeed that Euphone was working. It was = probably the loudest 32' I have ever heard. I remember it had come from some big auditorium out in the midwest, Minnesota or Michigan or somewhere like = that and installed in the forties. It was only useful for final cadences and such since it was so completely overwhelming. It can be heard on Neil Robinson's recording of the Dupre "Vepres de Commun". In Larry Trupiano's recent excellent rebuild there it was replaced by a more useful 32' Contra Bombarde with wooden resonators and a stopped 32'. The balcony would not have held all three. The Euphone were those enormous black stovepipe looking things that mitered forward at their tops on the right side of the gallery as you looked at it. I have always wondered what kind of rigging Larry used to get them out of there or if they had to be cut up. While I miss its drama I realize the present solution is far more musical.   Ken ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~= ~ Kenneth G. Potter, Minister of Music Home = 914/358-2528 St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Westchester Square Church = 718/931-9270 2500 Westchester Avenue, Bronx, New York 10461 e-mail = tracker@j51.com ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~= ~    
(back) Subject: Re: Free Reeds, Reedless Reeds From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2000 14:57:35 -0700   Hmm ... maybe my recollection is faulty, and/or Edgar Hiller had it = disconnected. I surely remember PULLING it, and nothing happening.   What do you know of the present sad situation? Is the Rector a madman, or = WHAT?   Cheers,   Bud   Ken and Chris Potter wrote:   > on 4/28/00 1:12 PM, PipeChat at Bud wrote: > > > I think we're confusing a couple of things here ... free (harmonium) = reeds > > were > > indeed used in pipe organs for various purposes ... if I remember = correctly, > > years ago St. Mary-the-Virgin in NYC had a knob for a free-reed 32' = Euphonium > > (long since disconnected, or never installed in the first place ... it = wasn't > > playing when I played the organ in the '60s); > > I sang in the choir at Smoky Mary's in the sixties during the > Palsgrove/Robinson era and indeed that Euphone was working. It was = probably > the loudest 32' I have ever heard. I remember it had come from some big > auditorium out in the midwest, Minnesota or Michigan or somewhere like = that > and installed in the forties. It was only useful for final cadences and > such since it was so completely overwhelming. It can be heard on Neil > Robinson's recording of the Dupre "Vepres de Commun". In Larry = Trupiano's > recent excellent rebuild there it was replaced by a more useful 32' = Contra > Bombarde with wooden resonators and a stopped 32'. The balcony would = not > have held all three. The Euphone were those enormous black stovepipe > looking things that mitered forward at their tops on the right side of = the > gallery as you looked at it. I have always wondered what kind of = rigging > Larry used to get them out of there or if they had to be cut up. While I > miss its drama I realize the present solution is far more musical. > > Ken > = ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~= ~ > Kenneth G. Potter, Minister of Music Home = 914/358-2528 > St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Westchester Square Church = 718/931-9270 > 2500 Westchester Avenue, Bronx, New York 10461 e-mail = tracker@j51.com > = ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~= ~ > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Choral List Info (x post) From: "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net> Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2000 06:07:53 -0500   choralist@lists.Colorado.EDU Roy   ScottFop@aol.com wrote:   > Does anyone have information on a list dealing with choral music and = singers? > Any info will be greatly appreciated. > > Thanks- > > Scott F. Foppiano, Director of Music and Liturgical Coordination > National Shrine of the Little Flower, Royal Oak, MI > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: New Books at OHS From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2000 19:18:50 -0400   The Organ Historical Society has added several new books to the OHS = Catalog opening page at http://www.ohscatalog.org. Here are examples:   The Organs of the Cathedrals of France -- 180 pictures of organs in all of the cathedrals   Organ Dictionary by Wilffried Praet -- a 500-page compilation of organ terms in 19 languages   The Sydney Town Hall Organ by Robert Ampt -- this magnificent organ was built by William Hill & Son in 1890 with 126 stops   Johann Sebastian Bach: The Learned Musician by Christoph Wolff -- a new biography receiving stellar reviews. Great for performers and non-performing music lovers.   Thanks. Bill    
(back) Subject: Re: why I don't quit From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Sat, 29 Apr 2000 09:04:52 +0800   Bud, my sentiments exactly! I have been at it for 67 years, starting on an = old Crown reed organ, then a Cornish and an Estey!! I progressed to pipe organ 60 = years ago and it has been an important part of my life every since!   Cheers, Bob.   Quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote:   > Bob -- I've been tempted to ... Lord KNOWS I've been tempted to ... and = I've even > STOPPED playing in churches for several years at a stretch, either by = choice or > because of health problems. BUT ... I always end up going back to it. I = LOVE it > ... I love the mundane little things like laying out the music and = posting the > hymns on the board and changing my shoes; I love watching the choir in = procession; > I love the mighty roar of the hymns at Christmas and Easter; I love = hearing the > congregation chant a Psalm REALLY well, and knowing that I taught them = to do that; > I love improvising on the Chant during Communion, and at the end of = Evensong; I am > genuinely moved when people come up to me with tears in their eyes (as = they did > after the most recent Good Friday service) to say how much the music = moved THEM; I > love how the choir marches around with their chests all puffed out after = they've > pulled off something really spectacular. > > I got hooked when I was a child, watching Miss Addie play the Estey; I = guess I'm > still hooked. > > Cheers, > > Bud > > Bob Scarborough wrote: > > > At 04:07 PM 4/28/2000 +0800, Bob Elms wrote: > > >To say that churches "don't care about you" is utter rubbish! If that = is your > > >experience my friend, you chose the wrong church!!<snip> > > > > I resolved the problem long ago by choosing "none of the above". > > > > DeserTBoB > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org   -- ----------------------------------------------------- Click here for Free Video!! http://www.gohip.com/freevideo/      
(back) Subject: Re: (or should that be "Was"?) Fw: A Serious Question From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2000 20:26:44 -0500   At 4/28/00 10:11 AM, DeserTBoB wrote a thoroughly fascinating description of the Everett Orgatron, etc.   Thanks, DB -- I enjoyed it!! I've never actually seen an Orgatron myself, and have always been curious. They sound like they'd be interesting = machines!!   I guess I'll have to add the Orgatron to my list of other large and heavy musical instruments that I wish to own in the future...like I need another thing added to *that* list...<big grin>   Someone also mentioned those "12-note 16' bourdon bass reed boxes" that Wicks used to use. I've gotta ask -- does anyone have one of them laying around collecting dust that they might part with?? That's another item on my personal "I want one of those" list...<g>   Cheers!   Tim