PipeChat Digest #1253 - Friday, February 4, 2000
 
Choral directors vs. Organists (kinda long)
  by "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu>
dedication concert
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Choral directors vs. Organists (kinda long)
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: Choral directors vs. Organists (kinda long)
  by "Chris Baker" <cembalist@chorale.demon.co.uk>
Re: Choral directors vs. Organists (kinda long)
  by "Douglas A Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com>
Re: Choral directors vs. Organists (kinda long)
  by "Roger Brown" <robrown@free.net.au>
Re: Choral directors vs. Organists (kinda long)
  by "Dr. Peter Pocock" <pocock@mciworld.com>
WurliTzer Debut Tonight - West Seattle - Dennis James
  by <MUSCUR@aol.com>
 



(back) Subject: Choral directors vs. Organists (kinda long) From: "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu> Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2000 08:13:06 -0500   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_00B8_01BF6EE7.AA75A280 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   This may be a controversial issue, I don't know. But I need opinions, =3D and I=3D20 figured what better way....   I was to accompany a women's choir on Schubert's "The Lord is My =3D Shepherd" on organ (I don't know why). There is a student director, and the =3D regular director. Anyways, I was trying to explain why I was playing things the way that I = =3D was, i.e. reeds don't sound particularly quickely, the sound is going -over- = =3D everyone's=3D20 head and it sounds different in the audience, playing quick triplets is = =3D likely to get a muddy sound, etc. Anywho, there I was trying to explain this when the = =3D student=3D20 director (who I know quite well) said "Look, I'M the director! I've =3D performed this piece before!" I also have to say that this was said quite loudly in the =3D presence of the=3D20 entire women's choir and of course, everyone was listening.=3D20   This is the second time that this has happened to me. I had an assistant = =3D organist=3D20 only position when I was 16, and it was the same deal. I was "reduced" =3D in musician- ship because I was not the director. I am both an organist and a choir =3D director, and have been for longer than this women was even directing. We have no qualms =3D with each other, since I've known her for a while, but I told her, that I would hope that = =3D she would trust me to do the musically correct thing. Also, I was doing what -my- organ =3D teacher told me to do. He teaches here at SU and was the Poister competition winner. Thus, = =3D I would not=3D20 feel right about straying from his suggestions.   Is this typical? Is it that stereotypical choral/vocal thing? (I know =3D about -that- reputation.)   In any case, I told her she can just get the piano to do it.=3D20   Feel free to bash me privately.   -Rebekah     ------=3D_NextPart_000_00B8_01BF6EE7.AA75A280 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META content=3D3D"text/html; charset=3D3Diso-8859-1" =3D http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.00.2314.1000" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#d8d8d8> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>This may be a controversial issue, I don't know. But = =3D I need=3D20 opinions, and I </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>figured what better way....</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>I was to accompany a women's choir on Schubert's =3D "The Lord is=3D20 My Shepherd"</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>on organ (I don't know why). There is a student =3D director, and=3D20 the regular director.</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>Anyways, I was trying to explain why I was playing = =3D things the=3D20 way that I was,</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>i.e. reeds don't sound particularly quickely, the = =3D sound is=3D20 going -over- everyone's </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>head and it sounds different in the audience, =3D playing quick=3D20 triplets is likely to get</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>a muddy sound, etc. Anywho, there I was trying to = =3D explain this=3D20 when the student </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>director (who I know quite well) said "Look, I'M the = =3D director!=3D20 I've performed this piece</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>before!" I also have to say that this was said quite = =3D loudly in=3D20 the presence of the </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>entire women's choir and of course, everyone was =3D listening.=3D20 </FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>This is the second time that this has happened to = =3D me. I had an=3D20 assistant organist </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>only position when I was 16, and it was the same =3D deal. I was=3D20 "reduced" in musician-</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>ship because I was not the director. I am both an = =3D organist and=3D20 a choir director, and have</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>been for longer than this women was even directing. =3D We have no=3D20 qualms with each other,</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>since I've known her for a while, but I told her, = =3D that I would=3D20 hope that she would trust me</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>to do the musically correct thing. Also, I was doing = =3D what -my-=3D20 organ teacher told me to</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>do. He teaches here at SU and was the Poister =3D competition=3D20 winner. Thus, I would not </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>feel right about straying from his =3D suggestions.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>Is this typical? Is it that stereotypical =3D choral/vocal thing?=3D20 (I know about -that- reputation.)</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>In any case, I told her she can just get the piano = =3D to do it.=3D20 </FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>Feel free to bash me privately.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>-Rebekah</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_00B8_01BF6EE7.AA75A280--    
(back) Subject: dedication concert From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2000 08:20:10 EST   Hi list- This Sunday, February 6, at 3:30 PM I will be performing a dedication = concert at Bethel Presbyterian Church, in Cornelius, North Carolina. (just north = of Charlotte, NC) I will be joined by the church's handbell choir, the = Bethel Chancel Choir, and a brass quartet. This program is to dedicate the new 3 manual Ahlborn-Galanti organ with 4 ranks of pipes. Works include: Grand Processional--Shaw (with brass) Water Music Suite--Handel (with brass) Fantasy and Fugue in G Minor--Bach Sonata III--Guilmant Pastorale--Franck Cortege and Litany--Dupre The Squirrel--Weaver Trumpet Tune--German   The new organ replaces a small 2 manual Blakely tracker from the late = 1980's that was literally falling apart. The Great speakers are encased in the = case of the old instrument, and the other divisions are housed existing = chambers. In case you haven't heard an Ahlborn-Galanti organ, you will be amazed at = how well it blends with the pipework. The concert is free of charge and all = are invited.   Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: Choral directors vs. Organists (kinda long) From: <DRAWKNOB@aol.com> Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2000 09:28:24 EST   In a message dated 2/4/00 7:17:50 AM Central Standard Time, = rringram@syr.edu writes:   << I told her she can just get the piano to do it. >>   Rebekah,   Good for you! This is the very reason why I don't like to be only the organist anymore. For over 13 years now I have been both = organist/director and I don't think I'd ever consider a future position as only organist. = (I guess it's a control thing.) Fortunately, I have a good working relationship with everyone at my church =   (Pastor, staff, choir members, parishioners, etc...) and if any questions arise concerning registrations or tempi it's me, myself, and I who's = asking the questions.   John A. Gambill, Jr. Organist/Choirmaster Oak Cliff Lutheran Church (ELCA) Dallas, Texas  
(back) Subject: Re: Choral directors vs. Organists (kinda long) From: "Chris Baker" <cembalist@chorale.demon.co.uk> Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2000 14:28:50 +0000   From: Rebekah > This may be a controversial issue, =A0 SNIP > I was to accompany a women's choir on SNIP > There is a student director, and the > regular director. > Anyways, I was trying to explain why I was playing things the way > that I was, > SNIP > when > the student > director (who I know quite well) said "Look, I'M the director! I've > performed this piece > before!" I also have to say that this was said quite loudly in the > presence of the > entire women's choir and of course, everyone was listening. > =A0 > Is this typical? Is it that stereotypical choral/vocal thing? (I > know about -that- reputation.)   Hi Becky   You point up the problem of ill-defined roles. There are always going to be difficulties if more than one person has an area of responsibility for the music, if no one is designated as *Director* of Music.   In England particularly, over the last twenty plus years, there has been an explosion in the numbers of people coming forward as choir directors. For every qualified, (gifted, acknowledged) musician in this number, there seem to be a half-dozen who are frankly incompetent.   The relationship between choir director and organist, where neither is gifted the senior role, depends on respect, confidence and trust. This in its turn requires an equivalence of ability between the two. Unfortunately this is rarely the case, and these days it is quite common to find people standing in front of the choir, directing choir and organist, who cannot aspire to the minimum requirement of any musical director: that s/he be the most accomplished musician present.   In the situation you gave above, you do not mention whether you attended as the musical director, or as the accompanist. If your role was simply(!) that of accompanist under another's direction, then it would seem that you were obliged to offer the accompaniment required by the director, and to make the best of it that you could. If you were quite certain that the accomp was not working, then it was your duty to point this out to the director, *after* giving it a try, and to make your suggestions for improvements. (though ideally this should have been discussed and determined before the rehearsal.)   There are so many variables in this topic, that it nearly always causes argument (albeit 'civilised', hopefully).   Where an organist/director of music is highly qualified and experienced, it can be almost impossible to incorporate a choir director into equation. Although this role is often very successfully fulfilled by an assistant organist who works under the organist's direction.   Good luck,   Regards, Chris Baker.  
(back) Subject: Re: Choral directors vs. Organists (kinda long) From: "Douglas A Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2000 11:09:28 -0500       On Fri, 4 Feb 2000 08:13:06 -0500 "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu> writes: >This may be a controversial issue, I don't know. But I need opinions, >and I >figured what better way.... > > >Is this typical? Is it that stereotypical choral/vocal thing? (I know >about -that- reputation.) > >In any case, I told her she can just get the piano to do it. > >Feel free to bash me privately. > >-Rebekah > Dear Becky,   Why don't you take this opportunity to call Tom Baker and have luch together. I know that he might be able to help you with this problem. (Well, not with the problem, but with how you deal with her --...er.....it) ;-)     Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY  
(back) Subject: Re: Choral directors vs. Organists (kinda long) From: "Roger Brown" <robrown@free.net.au> Date: Sat, 5 Feb 2000 03:34:25 +1100       RI> director (who I know quite well) said "Look, I'M the = director! I've RI> performed this piece before!" I also have to say that this was said = quite RI> loudly in the presence of the entire women's choir and of course, = everyone RI> was listening.     RI> Is this typical? Is it that stereotypical choral/vocal thing? (I know = about -that- reputation.)   In my time as an assistant organist NO. Certainly plenty of times = when the "boss" politely and firmly let me know how he wanted things done (and = usually with constructive and WELL informed advice) but never the sort of = insecure reaction you describe.   But I think the key is the word INSECURE - that's what seems to leap at = me from your account. Quite clearly your student director was very uncertain = about his/her capacities in that situation and just couldn't handle the = additional pressure of having to cope with all sorts of technical considerations from = you - however valid. Not very pleasant for you but I wouldn't see it as a = slight on your standing - just that the person probably had no idea of the = limitations of the instrument and wasn't ready to cope with them.   He/she will learn but I agree its not pleasant for you while they = gain that security.     Where I HAVE seen this sort of thing (in a slightly altered form) = is in situations when organists need to cope with orchestral (and for some = reason especially BRASS) players. These people seem in my experience to = think that organists are a bit beneath them and don't know all that much - at least = here in Australia they do. Where I have seen this regularly is at National RSCM = Summer schools which are a big thing in this country. Not infrequently the = orchestral players being used for major services will try and get a bit sassy with = whoever might be the course director - who is almost always a VERY top UK = cathedral musician.   Generally these people can VERY effectively cope with such problems - I = remember for example David Hill utterly demolishing one argumentative string = leader by grabbing his instrument, playing the section perfectly the way HE = wanted it phrased, and snapping "If I can do it properly why on earth can't you!!" = But I also remember from many years ago an incident when a very famous = English composer/ director (who at that time was really only starting out in the = latter capacity) really losing it in dealing with some talkative though = perhaps not exactly top drawer brass players in a rather pressure cooker = cathedral rehearsal. Again - simply a certain amount of insecurity which got in the = way of professionalism.   What I notice that is fully relevant to your situation is that the = really TOP directors just don't have that problem - their experience and feeling of = total security allows them to cope with whatever comes up.   I would say try and be tolerant (even though I know this sort of thing = can be upsetting) - its a reflection on THEM - not you.   Regards     Roger   Roger Brown www.RogerBrown.tripod.com robrown@free.net.au      
(back) Subject: Re: Choral directors vs. Organists (kinda long) From: "Dr. Peter Pocock" <pocock@mciworld.com> Date: Fri, 04 Feb 2000 08:42:56 -0800     --Boundary_(ID_xtrnTF5AQJ4+hMf8fO8KVQ) Content-type: text/plain; charset=3D"us-ascii"; format=3Dflowed   At 05:13 AM 02/04/2000 , Becky wrote: >I was to accompany a women's choir on Schubert's "The Lord is My = Shepherd" >on organ (I don't know why). There is a student director, and the regular =   >director. >Anyways, I was trying to explain why I was playing things the way that I = was, >i.e. reeds don't sound particularly quickely, the sound is going -over- >everyone's >head and it sounds different in the audience, playing quick triplets is >likely to get >a muddy sound, etc. Anywho, there I was trying to explain this when the >student >director (who I know quite well) said "Look, I'M the director! I've >performed this piece >before!" I also have to say that this was said quite loudly in the >presence of the >entire women's choir and of course, everyone was listening.   Hi Becky,   The problem here is two-fold. Firstly, a lack of knowledge of the piece = by the Director. If this person checked the score they would find that it = was written for piano originally (as I seem to remember). The nature of the accompaniment is that it really does not work on organ especially if it is =   done to fast. The last time I performed it (about a year ago) I arranged the accompaniment for harp and strings (taking a little license) and it = was exquisite.   Secondly - the accompanist/director relationship. First a little about my =   background - my bachelors degree is in organ performance and my Masters = and Doctorates are in Choral Music, as a result, I often sit on both sides of the situation. When working in a choral situation as Director, whether it =   be church or Master Chorale environment, I am very conscious of the abilities and needs of my accompanist. This person can make or break you. =   A mature, well-rounded, confident conductor will cherish and nurture their =   accompanist, if they are good, and challenge them to fulfill their potential, helping them to grow in gentle ways if they need to be brought along to a higher level. I can honestly say in all my years of conducting =   I have never ever publicly reduced my accompanist in the eyes of my choir (I have had serious private discussions when appropriate and once terminated one). I have,however, made a joke about something in a caring way, giving the accompanist another chance to make it right.   An accompanist friend told me recently of a situation where he was sight-reading a very difficult piece in rehearsal (the Director had not given it to him before the rehearsal). The Director stopped in the middle of the piece and said groughly "would you PLEASE play the right notes." My experience is that when someone does this they are transferring their own incompetency onto their accompanist, in an attempt to make themselves look good in front of the choir. This is what is happening in your case. It should be a team effort. If the accompanist = is not up to scratch, then help them get their. If it is not possible for them to reach the level you want, then find a new one (often easier said than done).   The accompanist I have for the Santa Clarita Master Chorale - Ann Moore, = is exceptional. There is a rare communication between the two of us that is unspoken. She just "knows" what I want and what to do. This = communication has been there from the first day we worked together, and has only grown since. She first accompanied my church choir, and she grew dramatically over the two years or so that we worked together their. Then I asked her to accompany the Master Chorale, and I have to say that we are privileged to have such excellence in our midst. When I was at the church, we would often do piano and organ duets - concertos or arrangements of classical pieces. This "rare communication" has carried over to that environment too, and as a result it was such a pleasure to work together. Although I am no longer working at the church, we are looking at continuing our collaboration in preparing concert repertoire.   Conversely, the accompanist who tries to take on the role of the Director during the rehearsal that you are running, is somewhat out of line. What = I am really saying here is that communication (privately when necessary, never in front of the group) and respect are the keys to success in this situation.   My motto is: Nurture and cherish your accompanist - he/she is the = greatest asset you have.   I hope that this helps.   Good luck in your situation.   Peter!     Peter G. Pocock, D.M.A. E-mail: mailto:peter@peterpocock.com   --Boundary_(ID_xtrnTF5AQJ4+hMf8fO8KVQ) Content-type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable   <html> At 05:13 AM 02/04/2000 , Becky wrote:<br> <font size=3D3D2><blockquote type=3D3Dcite cite>I was to accompany a = women's choir on Schubert's &quot;The Lord is My Shepherd&quot;</font><br> on organ (I don't know why). There is a student director, and the regular director.<br> Anyways, I was trying to explain why I was playing things the way that I was,<br> i.e. reeds don't sound particularly quickely, the sound is going -over- everyone's <br> head and it sounds different in the audience, playing quick triplets is likely to get<br> a muddy sound, etc. Anywho, there I was trying to explain this when the student <br> director (who I know quite well) said &quot;Look, I'M the director! I've performed this piece<br> before!&quot; I also have to say that this was said quite loudly in the presence of the <br> entire women's choir and of course, everyone was listening. <br> </blockquote><br> Hi Becky,<br> <br> The problem here is two-fold.&nbsp; Firstly, a lack of knowledge of the piece by the Director.&nbsp; If this person checked the score they would find that it was written for piano originally (as I seem to remember).&nbsp; The nature of the accompaniment is that it really does not work on organ especially if it is done to fast.&nbsp; The last time I performed it (about a year ago) I arranged the accompaniment for harp and strings (taking a little license) and it was exquisite. <br> <br> Secondly - the accompanist/director relationship.&nbsp; First a little about my background - my bachelors degree is in organ performance and my Masters and Doctorates are in Choral Music, as a result, I often sit on both sides of the situation.&nbsp; When working in a choral situation as Director, whether it be church or Master Chorale environment, I am very conscious of the abilities and needs of my accompanist.&nbsp; This person can make or break you. A mature, well-rounded, confident conductor will cherish and nurture their accompanist, if they are good, and challenge them to fulfill their potential, helping them to grow in gentle ways if they need to be brought along to a higher level.&nbsp; I can honestly say in all my years of conducting I have never ever publicly reduced my accompanist in the eyes of my choir (I have had serious private discussions when appropriate and once terminated one).&nbsp; I have,however, made a joke about something in a caring way, giving the accompanist another chance to make it right.<br> <br> An accompanist friend told me recently of a situation where he was sight-reading a very difficult piece in rehearsal (the Director had not given it to him before the rehearsal). The Director stopped in the middle of the piece and said groughly &quot;would you PLEASE play the right notes.&quot;&nbsp;&nbsp; My experience is that when someone does this they are transferring their own incompetency onto their accompanist, in an attempt to make themselves look good in front of the choir.&nbsp; This is what is happening in your case.&nbsp; It should be a team effort.&nbsp; If the accompanist is not up to scratch, then help them get their.&nbsp; If it is not possible for them to reach the level you want, then find a new one (often easier said than done).<br> <br> The accompanist I have for the Santa Clarita Master Chorale - Ann Moore, is exceptional.&nbsp; There is a rare communication between the two of us that is unspoken.&nbsp; She just &quot;knows&quot; what I want and what to do.&nbsp; This communication has been there from the first day we worked together, and has only grown since.&nbsp; She first accompanied my church choir, and she grew dramatically over the two years or so that we worked together their.&nbsp; Then I asked her to accompany the Master Chorale, and I have to say that we are privileged to have such excellence in our midst.&nbsp; When I was at the church, we would often do piano and organ duets - concertos or arrangements of classical pieces.&nbsp; This &quot;rare communication&quot; has carried over to that environment too, and as a result it was such a pleasure to work together.&nbsp; Although I am no longer working at the church, we are looking at continuing our collaboration in preparing concert repertoire.<br> <br> Conversely, the accompanist who tries to take on the role of the Director during the rehearsal that you are running, is somewhat out of line.&nbsp; What I am really saying here is that communication (privately when necessary, never in front of the group) and respect are the keys to success in this situation.<br> <br> My motto is:&nbsp; Nurture and cherish your accompanist - he/she is the greatest asset you have.&nbsp; <br> <br> I hope that this helps.<br> <br> Good luck in your situation.<br> <br> Peter!<br> <br> <br> <div>Peter G. Pocock, D.M.A.</div> <div>E-mail: <a href=3D3D"mailto:peter@peterpocock.com"=3D EUDORA=3D3DAUTOURL>mailto:peter@peterpocock.com</a></div> </html>   --Boundary_(ID_xtrnTF5AQJ4+hMf8fO8KVQ)--  
(back) Subject: WurliTzer Debut Tonight - West Seattle - Dennis James From: <MUSCUR@aol.com> Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2000 13:23:21 EST   If you are anywhere in the northwestern part of the US this month you're=20 invited to attend a performance featuring the latest addition to the theatre= =20 organ world- the Hokum Hall Mighty WurliTzer in West Seattle. The crew are=20 applying the finishing touches today to the 2/10 (eventually to be 2/12) for= =20 the debut tonight in our second annual "Musica Curiosa" variety program to b= e=20 repeated weekly on Friday and Saturday nights all month. There are just a=20 few "best remaining seats" remaining with over 70% of the house already sold= =20 for every show in the 8 performance run. Here's the local press release wit= h=20 some more detail:   The Hokum Hall WurliTzer is Unveiled in "Musica Curiosa 2" Friday and Saturday Evenings in February Seattle, WA=E2=80=94Professor Hokum W. Jeebs, the colorful proprietor of Wes= t=20 Seattle's popular Hokum Hall, has announced that the installation of a=20 vintage 1929 WurliTzer Theatre Pipe Organ is complete. The elegant instrumen= t=20 is the centerpiece of a celebration of unique and eccentric instruments and=20 their music, MUSICA CURIOSA 2, opening Friday, February 4 for a 4-weekend=20 engagement.   MUSICA CURIOSA 2 will play Fridays and Saturdays at 8 P.M. through February=20 26. A program of delightful treats for the ear, MUSICA CURIOSA 2 features=20 Paramount Theatre house organist Dennis James, host and curator of Seattle's= =20 popular "Silent Movie Mondays " series, guest local performers Andy Crow and= =20 Christian Swenson, and the Professor himself.   The Mighty WurliTzer and the famous Hammond B-3 (organ duets!) will share th= e=20 Hokum Hall stage with the Sordino DeSoto, the Musical Saw, and other=20 eccentricities from the performers' collections. The Baschet Cristal, which=20 had its U.S. debut at the Seattle World=E2=80=99s Fair in 1962, will be demo= nstrated=20 and played by virtuoso Dennis James. Besides an accompanied silent Laurel &=20 Hardy film and authentic human jazz, Seattle audiences will hear the first=20 area performances of a recently discovered work by P. D. Q. Bach, "The Littl= e=20 Pickle Book," for Theatre Pipe Organ and Dill Piccolos, plus the usual Hokum= =20 surprises.   Tickets for MUSICA CURIOSA 2 are $12 general admission and $10 for students=20 and seniors. A $2 discount is offered with phone reservations, and groups of= =20 7 or more pay only $7 each. Reserved premium table seats are $12, with no=20 discount. For reservations and information, call (206) 937.3613. Check the=20 Hokum Hall web site at www.hokumhall.org for additional discount offers.   Hokum Hall presents live musical and theatrical performance traditions in an= =20 historic West Seattle setting.   DENNIS JAMES, Musica Curiosa Founder and Director Dennis James has made a performing career out of the delight in=20 discovery by taking up obscure and challenging musical instruments that have= =20 fallen into disuse but for which there remains a viable repertoire. Emergin= g=20 as a 'curious musician with curious instruments' on the international scene=20 in 1991 with over fifty music festival appearances that year (from Lincoln=20 Center's Mostly Mozart to the major festivals in London, Amsterdam, Salzburg= =20 and Vienna), he has since developed a concert, recording, and lecture career= =20 that keeps him traveling over two-thirds of the year. =20   James plays an eclectic assortment of over fifty musical instruments with a=20 diverse repertoire selected for each performance from his ever-expanding=20 collection. Included, among many others, are Benjamin Franklin's Glass=20 Armonica (the first truly American musical instrument) and the Baschet=20 brothers' Cristal (the amazing sonorous sculpture invented in Paris). James= =20 has now emerged as an active modern-day concert performer of the Theremin,=20 the first successful electronic musical instrument.