PipeChat Digest #1257 - Sunday, February 6, 2000
 
Re: Dir.VS org. applied to Mozart
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
Hymnology
  by "Douglas A Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com>
Re: Hymnology
  by <MAA718@aol.com>
Another "house" organ
  by "Charles Wertalik" <wertzl@earthlink.net>
Re: Another "house" organ
  by "Sam Vause" <vause@home.com>
Re: Hymnology
  by "Bud" <Quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re:Wurlitzer Weekend 2000
  by "Richard Obert" <rdobert@earthlink.net>
dusty treasures (X-posted)
  by "Bud" <Quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: dusty treasures (X-posted)
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Dir.VS org. applied to Mozart
  by <geriskip@juno.com>
RE: Hymnology
  by "Mark L. Hopper" <mlhopper@email.msn.com>
Re: Hymnology
  by <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: dusty treasures (X-posted)
  by <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
 



(back) Subject: Re: Dir.VS org. applied to Mozart From: "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net> Date: Sun, 6 Feb 2000 08:31:40 -0500 (EST)   >The keyboard equivalent of string tremolandi > is the infamous Alberti bass. I also will occasionally hold the outer notes of the chord and repeat the inner.   >If the original sports a bass line with reiterated > 16ths, it's usually sufficient to play reiterated > 8ths or alternating 8ths in octaves with an > Alberti pattern in 16ths above it. For reiterated notes in the pedal I usually alternate at octaves, and seldom use 16' pitch.   Another impotant consideration is keeping the texture of the accompaniment clean and clear to that it is useful to the singers.   bruce cornely ~:~:~ rohrschok8@webtv.net gainesville, florida   http://community.webtv.net/cremona84000/ALLHAILTHEPOWERand http://community.webtv.net/hydrant/TheBeaglesNest http://community.webtv.net/rohrschok8/OrganMusicLibrary    
(back) Subject: Hymnology From: "Douglas A Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Sun, 6 Feb 2000 11:44:45 -0500   H A L P !   After a particularily "awlful" excuse for a hymn in church today and an upcoming Worship & Music Committee meeting tomorrow night - I am in need of assistance.   I am looking for a written defination of WHAT make a good Hymn, mostly centered on the musical aspects such as range, singablilty, etc.   If you havve any such resources htat I can quote at our meeting I'd appreciate hearing from you !     Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY   Dougcampbell@juno.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Hymnology From: <MAA718@aol.com> Date: Sun, 6 Feb 2000 12:17:17 EST   What was the hymn??  
(back) Subject: Another "house" organ From: "Charles Wertalik" <wertzl@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 6 Feb 2000 15:44:54 -0500   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0071_01BF70B9.1CBD6C60 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   In Manchester, VT there's a mansion, "Hildene," that was owned by Robert = =3D Todd Lincoln, son of President Abraham Lincoln and his wife, Mary Todd =3D Lincoln. It contains a pipe organ that's played by a piano roll! Guided = =3D tours are held on a (pretty much) daily basis, and the organ is played =3D each time.   Some of you probably know about this already. Just thought I'd mention =3D it in connection with the current dialog about the Connable mansion =3D organ in Toronto.   Chuck Wertalik Resident organ nut Roanoke, VA   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0071_01BF70B9.1CBD6C60 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META content=3D3D"text/html; charset=3D3Diso-8859-1" =3D http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.00.2614.3500" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>In Manchester, VT there's a mansion, = =3D "Hildene,"=3D20 that was owned by Robert Todd Lincoln, son of President Abraham Lincoln = =3D and his=3D20 wife, Mary Todd Lincoln. It contains a pipe organ that's played by a =3D piano roll!=3D20 Guided tours are held on a (pretty much) daily basis, and the organ is =3D played=3D20 each time.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Some of you probably know about = this=3D20 already.&nbsp;Just thought I'd mention it in connection with the current = =3D dialog=3D20 about the Connable mansion organ in Toronto.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Chuck Wertalik</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Resident organ nut</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Roanoke, = VA</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0071_01BF70B9.1CBD6C60--    
(back) Subject: Re: Another "house" organ From: "Sam Vause" <vause@home.com> Date: Sun, 6 Feb 2000 13:54:56 -0700   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_035C_01BF70A9.C0006AE0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   They have (at least) a cassette tape of music from the organ; don't know = =3D about a CD. --sam Sam Vause (Chandler, AZ)   ----- Original Message -----=3D20 From: Charles Wertalik=3D20 To: PipeChat=3D20 Sent: Sunday, February 06, 2000 1:44 PM Subject: Another "house" organ=3D20     In Manchester, VT there's a mansion, "Hildene," that was owned by Robert = =3D Todd Lincoln, son of President Abraham Lincoln and his wife, Mary Todd =3D Lincoln. It contains a pipe organ that's played by a piano roll! Guided = =3D tours are held on a (pretty much) daily basis, and the organ is played =3D each time.   Some of you probably know about this already. Just thought I'd mention =3D it in connection with the current dialog about the Connable mansion =3D organ in Toronto.   Chuck Wertalik Resident organ nut Roanoke, VA   ------=3D_NextPart_000_035C_01BF70A9.C0006AE0 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META content=3D3D"text/html; charset=3D3Diso-8859-1" =3D http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.00.2314.1000" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D3>They have (at least) a cassette tape of music from = =3D the organ;=3D20 don't know about a CD.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>--sam</DIV> <DIV>Sam Vause (Chandler, AZ)</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV style=3D3D"FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message -----=3D20 <DIV style=3D3D"BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; font-color: black"><B>From:</B> = <A=3D20 href=3D3D"mailto:wertzl@earthlink.net" =3D title=3D3Dwertzl@earthlink.net>Charles=3D20 Wertalik</A> </DIV> <DIV><B>To:</B> <A href=3D3D"mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org"=3D20 title=3D3Dpipechat@pipechat.org>PipeChat</A> </DIV> <DIV><B>Sent:</B> Sunday, February 06, 2000 1:44 PM</DIV> <DIV><B>Subject:</B> Another "house" organ </DIV></DIV> <DIV><BR></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>In Manchester, VT there's a mansion, = =3D "Hildene,"=3D20 that was owned by Robert Todd Lincoln, son of President Abraham Lincoln = =3D and his=3D20 wife, Mary Todd Lincoln. It contains a pipe organ that's played by a =3D piano roll!=3D20 Guided tours are held on a (pretty much) daily basis, and the organ is =3D played=3D20 each time.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Some of you probably know about = this=3D20 already.&nbsp;Just thought I'd mention it in connection with the current = =3D dialog=3D20 about the Connable mansion organ in Toronto.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Chuck Wertalik</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Resident organ nut</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=3D3DArial size=3D3D2>Roanoke, = VA</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_035C_01BF70A9.C0006AE0--    
(back) Subject: Re: Hymnology From: "Bud" <Quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 06 Feb 2000 13:43:28 -0800   Here's how I approach the choosing of ALL hymns:   (1) What's the range? My congregation's range is A flat below middle C to = A flat above middle C at the early Mass (!) ... it rises to B flat below middle C to D flat above middle C (in a pinch) at the High Mass. I NEVER = ask them to sing a hymn with a range of more than an octave, unless it's something VERY familiar, like "St Patrick's Breastplate" (grin). I = transpose everything as needed, but I try to stay within those ranges if at all possible. What it's DONE is make a very rich, cello-like sound at the = early Mass, and much more enthusiastic singing at the High Mass ... most folks today are by-courtesy altos and baritones, NOT sopranos and tenors with = lots of high notes. And it's gotten the MEN to sing at BOTH Masses.   (2) How does the melody move? The more stepwise motion and the fewer = leaps, the easier it is to sing, and it doesn't NECESSARILY make for a boring hymn-tune, as long as the HARMONY is interesting, and/or the rhythm is interesting without being unsingable (see below).   (3) Is the rhythm four-square, or does it try to get "cute"? I cannot = ABIDE syncopated congregational ANYTHINGS ... they just "don't get it", and I don't BLAME them ... the furthest afield we EVER go in that regard is "Lo, How A Rose E'er Blooming". However, if you're in a LCMS congregation, all bets about complex rhythms are OFF (grin).   (4) Perhaps most important, does the MUSIC fit the WORDS? As a famous contralto friend of mine used to say, "The problem with a lot of hymns is that the words say one thing, but the music says it ain't so!"   (5) Assuming (4), above, do the words have anything to SAY? We sing more = old "gospel" hymns than you'd expect to find in a high Anglican church = precisely because the words DO have something to say ... those old hymn writers had one eye FIRMLY fixed on heaven and the other on the texts of the King = James Bible. I don't think you can say the same about (most) contemporary hymn writers.   Case in point regarding (4): "The World Is Very Evil", from the extended poem of St. Bernard of Cluny, Hymns 595, 596, 597, 598 in the Episcopal Hymnal, 1940 ... Part One, "The World Is Very Evil", is set to an insipid tune in a major key, "Pearsall", by the composer of the same name (1836), and it goes downhill from there.   Since the old lectionary Gospel for Epiphany 6 (which doesn't happen every year, only in years with late Easter) is about the Second Coming and the Last Judgment, I wanted to use at least three of the four parts of the = hymn; we're singing Part I to "King's Lynn" , Part II to "Passion Chorale" (O Sacred Head), Part III to "St. Christopher" (to have ONE very familiar = tune, and it's for communion), and Part IV to "Aurelia" (OK, so that's TWO familiar tunes). I suppose we could have sung the whole thing to any one = of those tunes, but it would get kinda boring.   Now, I'm fortunate in that my congregation was used to such shenanigans = LONG before I came on the scene ... all I have to do is print in the bulletin under the hymn title, ("Sung to the tune 'Aurelia', Hymnal 396") and off they go, AS LONG AS the replacement tune is half-way familiar.   We sing a lot of English translations of Latin Office Hymns that aren't in our hymnal ... I find that I sometimes have to update the translation SOMEWHAT for an American congregation ... maybe our British cousins still remember what a "guerdon" is, but my folks sure don't. I usually translate it as "trophy" because it fits the rhyme-scheme, but that's not entirely accurate, I'm sure.   I'm fortunate that I'm not entirely tied to the 1940 Hymnal ... as good as it is, it's sorely deficient in hymns for Lent, Easter, Eucharist (other than those focusing on the Passion, rather than making the Great Thanksgiving) and Saints' Days ( since we follow the Missal Ordo, rather than the Prayer Book Kalendar). I've figured out how to typeset words hymnal-fashion under the tune, so I just print up the melody line and the words and stick whatever it is in the bulletin.   Cheers,   Bud   Douglas A Campbell wrote:   > H A L P ! > > After a particularily "awlful" excuse for a hymn in church today and an > upcoming Worship & Music Committee meeting tomorrow night - I am in need > of assistance. > > I am looking for a written defination of WHAT make a good Hymn, mostly > centered on the musical aspects such as range, singablilty, etc. > > If you havve any such resources htat I can quote at our meeting I'd > appreciate hearing from you ! > > Douglas A. Campbell > Skaneateles, NY > > Dougcampbell@juno.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re:Wurlitzer Weekend 2000 From: "Richard Obert" <rdobert@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 06 Feb 2000 15:52:34 -0800   There has been almost no mention of "The LATOS Wurlitzer Weekend" on the net so I am sending some of my impressions of the happenings.   The first concert was Saturday morning at 9:00 AM. with Dan Bellomy at = the Orpheum Wurlitzer. Dan has his own unique style and in this case was asked =   for a program of Jazz, big-band, and old-standard music, all of which he does very well. Dan opened with "Cosi-Cosa" and went through several "standards" before being joined by Carter Aristei, a local drummer who he met for the first time minutes before the start of the program. I am not a =   great fan of "organ-and" of any kind but this combination worked! They had =   the kind of telepathy seen in good jazz combos that have played together for years, a kind of "can you top this" feel that is missing in most of today's music. The,"drum and organ", was not over done, the use of the percussion was mostly to underscore the music and was only loud where punctuation was called for except for a couple of numbers where the,"let-it-all-hang-out", feeling is called for like "Cute" Which is essentially a percussion solo. After a few numbers that included Carter's participation, Dan went back to =   play a wide variety of carefully selected numbers including several of his =   famous "Make-it-sound-like-a Hammond" numbers. Dan commented that he especially liked the Orpheum organ and that the extra attention given the instrument by the crew, and by Tom Delay, (who spent the previous day tuning and polishing) was very evident. Dan hopes to make a recording of this organ in the near future. Outside of the few that don't like anyone's performance ever, the audience =   response was enthusiastic and Dan's careful attention to registration, tempo, and the mood of each number added to my enjoyment of this concert.   Most of the group attended an afternoon tour of the "Nethercutt-Collection" in Sylmar. The Directors always go out of their = way to make this trip worthwhile and in this case they featured the organ more =   than usual with numbers pre-recorded by several well-known artists.   Saturday evening Lew Williams played the Pasadena City College Wurlitzer, =   and presented a most enjoyable program which included "Great Moments" in theater organ like "Big Bad Leroy Brown", "Elvira", and "Chloe"(which us organ clods enjoy very much), along with the more common music like "The Widor Toccatta" and "The William Tell Overture", The contrasts of Lew's talents switching effortlessly from Classical, to novelty, to = old-standard, are startling. Speaking for myself, I am most impressed by his near "Note-for-note" reproductions of "Big-Band" standards like "Little Brown Jug", and " In The Mood" which include nearly all the individual instrumental "Breaks" of the original recordings. All-in- all an outstanding performance that resulted in not one, not two, but three encores, with the audience still asking for more! When Lew is having a = good time himself there is no one better at pleasing an audience!   Sunday morning at 10:00 found the group at the Bay Theater in Seal Beach to hear Chris Gorsuch on the former NY Paramount studio organ. The organ owned by Dick Loderhose has just had the console rebuilt and for the first =   time since it's installation in this area has a fully functional capture action. This along with much work by the theater crew allowed Chris to present a dazzling array of old-standard tunes with just enough jazz, blues, and up-tempo selections to keep the audience waiting to see what would come up next. I especially enjoyed his version of "Walking After Midnight". Chris is an artist that I will go out of my way to hear again, and the organ is going to be featured in a concert series this spring and summer.   Sunday afternoon we were at Plummer Auditorium to hear Lyn Larsen with Jack Bethards and his band. Lyn did a group of selections solo and then introduced Jack and the band. I previously stated that I am not thrilled = by "organ-ands" and I have heard several other attempts at organ and band presentations that ranged all the way from mediocre to just plain bad. = This time they got it right ! The feeling that I got was that the organ was another band-member and not the dominating source of music. The band was well-rehearsed and not too loud, The organ had it's solo breaks, and everything fitted beautifully. The band did a couple of solo numbers a-la Shep Fields, (a band leader of the forties), that I had almost forgotten about, and = they captured his style perfectly. Just before intermission Jack did a pseudo "commercial" in the forties-radio style about the availability of Lyn's records. Unfortunately We had another engagement in the early evening and had to leave shortly after the intermission so someone else will have to comment on the rest of the performance. This performance was = professionally recorded and hopefully a recording will be available to the public in the future.   To sum up the weekend there were about 230 full tickets sold and each venue had good walk-up sales except for Seal Beach where because of limited seating and the sell out last year, no attempt to attract the public was made. There was a huge audience at Fullerton, (approx. 850) which was the result of careful publicity by the OCTOS group along with the co-operation of the Fullerton Joint Union High School District Educational Foundation. The event was advertised as the big-band music of Glenn Miller, Tommy Dorsey, etc, and really attracted the local people. I have heard a lot of favorable comments about the weekend in general and only a few negative comments about individual incidents, these were far lower in number than the dedicated critics usual output. Wayne Flottman and Jim Dawson Who were the driving force behind this production are already planning for Wurlitzer Weekend III. Keep up the good work Wayne & Jim!   Dick Obert      
(back) Subject: dusty treasures (X-posted) From: "Bud" <Quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 06 Feb 2000 17:54:29 -0800   My Rector is on my case again to do "classical anthems, all classical anthems, all classical anthems all the time, nothing BUT classical anthems", etc. etc. etc., meaning NOTHING from the 19th or early 20th century (which of course is the bulk of the library, what the choir sings well, and what the congregation LIKES) ... no matter, we are to do CLASSICAL ANTHEMS to go with our recently-articulated quest for an "uptown image". Can't have any music that appeals to peoples' EMOTIONS, by God!   The retired choir director is behind this, of course ... she stomped out of church in the middle of communion today because we sang "Whiter Than Snow" (which was requested by a elderly parishioner who's dying, but no matter). She has the Rector's ear; I get this lecture everytime she and the Rector have lunch. She doesn't have a CLUE that she is the ONE person who shouldn't have ANYTHING to say about the music, if she had a SHRED of professional ethics. I don't criticise her regime; she shouldn't criticise mine. Oh well, she's a red-headed "diva".   I had it thrown up in my face by the Rector that SHE could do "classical anthems". Yeah, well, I've had first-hand from the CHOIR just how well those classical anthems were sung. NOT! And he forgets that I catalogued what little there was of their PITIFUL excuse for a choir library when I first came. I think they rang the changes on Mozart's "Ave verum" and Farrant's "Lord, For Thy Tender Mercy's Sake" on alternate Sundays, because that's ALL there WAS except for Christmas music, unless she took the rest of it home when she retired.   Of course, in the same breath, the Rector told me I'd have to do without a lead bass for a month while my bass soloist gets a new knee installed. Right. My other bass doesn't read music. This is ONLY a 10-12 cylinder choir at BEST, folks. Yeah, they read (except for the one bass, who's a good follower), and yeah, they show up, and yeah, they're pretty good, but I only have ONE strong voice in each section, and they're all married to each other (two and two, that is: the soprano to the tenor and the alto to the bass). So the alto will probably stay home to nurse her husband the bass.   Very good, Father. Anything you say, Father. Would you like me to walk on water next, Father? Maybe a complete performance of "Messiah" accompanied by our splendid HAMMOND organ in our TOTALLY dead room?   OK, got THAT out of my craw.   I wish I'd known Mason Martens. He must have been a saint, at least, if not a genius. Case in point: the "Sing Joyfully" series of anthem books (published by Walton Music) ... Vol. 1 (unison), Vol. 2 (2-part mixed or equal), Vol. 3 (3-part mixed, or equal, in some cases), Vol. 4 (4-part mixed, low tenor parts).   In the preface, he tells the story of how the anthem books came to be: he was organist in an RC church in Brooklyn with only FOUR TO SIX singers of a Sunday, but they were determined to keep a choir going. He scoured the highways and byways of NYC libraries for suitable materials, transposed them all for voices of limited range, realized the figured basses, etc. etc. etc. He also tells of doing all this at SIGHT while he was preparing the editions, AND supplying a singing part from the organ-bench whilst the choir sang from manuscript or Xerox copies. I wish he was still alive ... we could have compared notes. He also mentions that the organ was DREADFUL (grin).   Anyway, I HIGHLY recommend ALL these books. There's not a throwaway piece in the lot; the only one I ever HEARD of is "O Rest In The Lord"; the pieces range from the 16th to the 19th centuries; some are unknown works by major composers, some are familiar texts set by totally UNKNOWN composers. None are choir-fodder easy; none are impossible; ALL are GOOD music (classical anthems, Father!).   The one very minor caveat I have is a couple of the English translations (all are printed with the original language plus an alternative English translation for singing) ... he uses his own translation of "Nocte surgentes", rather than the familiar "Father, We Praise Thee, Now the Night Is Over" ... maybe the familiar translation was still under copyright to OUP ... who knows? and a translation of "Ave Maria" that fits the music, but doesn't follow the Latin text exactly. No problem .... we'll sing it in Latin ... but re-translating the "Hail Mary" seems to me to be something just ASKING for a dust-up, at least in a conservative church like ours. It says what it says.If your church won't admit the theology, then sing something else ... and he was doing this for an RC church, for heaven's sake!   But those are two very MINOR flaws that can easily be rectified. I simply had my choir write in the familiar translation of "Nocte surgentes", and we'll sing "Ave Maria" in Latin (one of the FEW things I CAN get away with in Latin).   So ... if you're looking for REALLY GOOD music for choirs of limited parts, numbers and/or ranges, check these out. The unison volume would serve a very SMART children's choir or boychoir VERY well, as well as adults. They're probably a little more difficult than most of the stuff in the "Morning Star Choirbook" series from Concordia, but the slant is definitely more high-church Anglican/Roman Catholic, rather than Lutheran. Which is NOT to say that just about anything BUT the "Hail Mary" couldn't be used in the context of a formal Protestant service.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: dusty treasures (X-posted) From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sun, 06 Feb 2000 18:11:33   At 05:54 PM 2/6/2000 -0800, you wrote: >My Rector is on my case again to do "classical anthems, all classical >anthems, all classical anthems all the time, nothing BUT classical >anthems", etc. etc. etc., meaning NOTHING from the 19th or early 20th >century<snipping where Bud spins the tale of what's happening at St. Matt's-by-the-Burger-King> >Of course, in the same breath, the Rector told me I'd have to do without >a lead bass for a month while my bass soloist gets a new knee installed. >Right. My other bass doesn't read music. This is ONLY a 10-12 cylinder >choir at BEST, folks. Yeah, they read (except for the one bass, who's a >good follower), and yeah, they show up, and yeah, they're pretty good, >but I only have ONE strong voice in each section, and they're all >married to each other (two and two, that is: the soprano to the tenor >and the alto to the bass). So the alto will probably stay home to nurse >her husband the bass. > >Very good, Father. Anything you say, Father. Would you like me to walk >on water next, Father?<snip>   Well, perhaps the Rect**...er, Rector should be asked point blank, "OK...WHO'S running this show...me or her?" Bring him back to reality a little bit. It's inexcusable for her to be having him on a set of strings like this, also, and shows him to be a weak sister at best. Take charge! They don't like it, I'm sure with your credentials you'd have NO problem getting another parish. Oh yeah..be SURE to note in your resum=E9 the experience on Le Grande HAMMONDium...it shows your mettle's been tested!   DB  
(back) Subject: Re: Dir.VS org. applied to Mozart From: <geriskip@juno.com> Date: Sun, 6 Feb 2000 21:55:13 -0500   There is a chapter on adapting piano accompaniments to the organ that might be helpful to some on the list found in " Principles of Organ Playing" by Hilty. Geri  
(back) Subject: RE: Hymnology From: "Mark L. Hopper" <mlhopper@email.msn.com> Date: Sun, 6 Feb 2000 21:40:57 -0600   Douglas -   Surely there is no better definition of quality hymnody than Eric = Routley's:   "A good hymn is one that is well-written, well-chosen, and well-sung."   I like to emphasize the well-chosen part of that.   Cheers!   Mark mahopper@bigfoot.com       Mark L. Hopper Organist/Music Associate Mountain Brook Presbyterian Church (PCUSA)      
(back) Subject: Re: Hymnology From: <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net> Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 00:12:06 -0500 (EST)   First off, the "hymn" is the text. The "tune" is the musical portion. Having said that...   1) the tune must fit the meter of the text. 2) A good tune is good music. 3) A good tune is singable by a majority of the congregation (a simple transposition may make that possible) 4) A good tune has musical direction and musical interest. (i.e., good phrases) 5) I personally think a tune shouldn't have too many musical ideas. 6) A good tune MAY take more than one hearing and singing to grow on you. 7) A good tune propels the text, but never interferes with it. 8) And, a good tune is playable.   My 8 cents worth. Neil    
(back) Subject: Re: dusty treasures (X-posted) From: <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net> Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 00:21:01 -0500 (EST)   Bud, if you have a committee that can do your complaining for you, you should encourage them to make it clear that the retired director is no longer the director. Having her there is not fair to you.   But, for the record, I usually pull out a golden oldie (classical) once each semester (I don't know how else to call the stretch from sept- dec, or jan-june).   I've been known to say from time to time, "Oh, I'm sorry, we just don't do thus and so here anymore."   Cheers, Neil