PipeChat Digest #1284 - Tuesday, February 29, 2000
 
VERY IMPORTANT - VIRUS WARNING
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
Re: Cavaille_Casavant
  by "Maynard Cuppy" <cuppy.maynard@mcleodusa.net>
Re: Cavaille_Casavant
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: facades, etc.
  by "Douglas A Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com>
Worcester MA
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: facades, etc.
  by "Stephen Ohmer" <knopfregal@yahoo.com>
Too much stop information
  by "Robert Horton" <gemshorn@ukans.edu>
Re: Too much stop information
  by <Quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Too much stop information
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Too much stop information
  by <Rohrschok502@cs.com>
Stops and how to handle 'em
  by <Quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Too much stop information
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Too much stop information
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
 



(back) Subject: VERY IMPORTANT - VIRUS WARNING From: "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 04:02:39 -0600   Folks   As you all know, we do not allow anyone to pass along Virus Warnings on this list except for the Administrators. And since I received a copy of a Virus from someone who is on one of the Organ Mailing lists I feel that I do need to warn everyone on this list about this problem.   There is something called PrettyPark.exe that is floating around. DO NOT run this file. If you have please go to: http://www.symantec.com/avcenter/venc/data/prettypark.worm.html to see how to eradicate it.   As part of Safe Computing, you should never run any file that you receive unless you know EXACTLY what it is and who it is from. If you receive a file out of the blue from someone you know, always check with them to see what they have sent you PRIOR to running the file.   David **************************************** David Scribner Co-Owner / Technical Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org 850-478-9635 mailto:david@blackiris.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Cavaille_Casavant From: "Maynard Cuppy" <cuppy.maynard@mcleodusa.net> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 06:24:24 -0600   You forgot to mention that Lawrence Phelps also is now late. I believe he died last year, but I could be wrong. Maynard   "ldpatte@attglobal.net" wrote:   > To Michael Williamson, Bud, and anyone else who is interested: > > According to my handbook from the 1999 OHS Convention in Montreal, > Jean-Louis Coignet has been Tonal Director at Casavant Freres Ltee since > 1981. Before that it was (the now late) Gerhard Brunzema from > 1972-1979; Lawrence Phelps from 1958-1972, and Stephen Stoot from > 1933-1958. > > Dave C. > London, Ont. > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Cavaille_Casavant From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 06:45:19 -0600   >You forgot to mention that Lawrence Phelps also is now late. I believe he >died last year, but I could be wrong. >Maynard   You are correct - Larry Phelps passed away last year.   David    
(back) Subject: Re: facades, etc. From: "Douglas A Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Mon, 28 Feb 2000 23:51:25 -0500       On Mon, 28 Feb 2000 22:59:29 -0500 "ldpatte@attglobal.net" <ldpatte@attglobal.net> writes: >Well, seeing that everybody is still putting their two cents' worth >in, >I might as well add mine. > Besides, what other name would you give >to >a "Trompette en Chamade"? Given the type of stop it is, "Horizontal >Trumpet" just doesn't cut it! On the other hand, I do think that we >need to use much thought and take care when we name organ stops.   On one organ that I know of, the Totally English Stop naming calls the "enchamade" simply the "Herald Trumpet" - Quite strightforward and very clear ! (Also Veddy, Veddy English)     Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY  
(back) Subject: Worcester MA From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 10:20:21 -0500   The organ at Wesley U. Methodist Church, Lincoln Square, Worcester MA, a Skinner Organ Co. Opus 615, 1927, was 4-62, now 4M, 72 R., divided = chancel. Rebuilt Principals in 1954 by GDH/Aeolian/Skinner, some tonal changes in Choir division 1970 by Berkshire Organ Co., recent restorative work by Czelusniak et Dugal, Inc. Organist/Music Director is Marjorie Ness.  
(back) Subject: Re: facades, etc. From: "Stephen Ohmer" <knopfregal@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 07:39:24 -0800 (PST)       --- "ldpatte@attglobal.net" <ldpatte@attglobal.net> wrote: > > > Recently, some have scowled at the fact that > American and Canadian > organs use different languages to designate > stops, instead ....   I don't mind an organ using different languages in the stop names so long as the stop name is correct - meaning that a Montre 8' is actually voiced as a French Montre 8' and not an old fashioned English Diapason or German Principal 8 (and not ALL Germans use a Z in principal, either).   The organ is capable of so much, just naming stops to fill the bill doesn't cut it - in any language. Let's be truthful.   This reminds me of all those Moeller Artiste instruments that I've played throughout the years. I really enjoyed most of them, but they could have been a bit more "honest" with their stop names, although they might have been boring: Principal 8 Principal 4 Principal 2 Rohrflote 8-4-2, etc. Gemshorn Quinte 1 1/3......     > designate that one as "Trompette", to indicate > a bright, fiery French > sounding reed. Then if you had one in another > division that was a > little less forward, it could be called the old > english "Trumpet", to > distinguish between the two. Besides, what > other name would you give to > a "Trompette en Chamade"? Given the type of > stop it is, "Horizontal > Trumpet" just doesn't cut it!   Somewhere I've seen an organ spec that had a stopped named "Trompet-en-dehoors." Dutch for hanging out straight?   Steve Ohmer   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Talk to your friends online with Yahoo! Messenger. http://im.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Too much stop information From: "Robert Horton" <gemshorn@ukans.edu> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 11:33:49 -0600   Stephen Ohmer wrote: > The organ is capable of so much, just naming > stops to fill the bill doesn't cut it - in any > language. Let's be truthful. Stephen, Beyond being truthful, let's aim for simple. Brewse mentioned an interest in names such as Chimney Flute and Spire Fl= ute which address elements of the pipes' construction. Sorry Bruce, as a performer I don't really care how the pipes are made--I have only to deal= with the sounds they produce! Rohrfl=F6te, Flauto d'amore, Gross Flute, Picco= lo, Hellfl=F6te, Bourdon, Gedackt, Koppelfl=F6te, Fl=FBte =E0 chemin=E9e, Dop= pelfl=F6te, etc...builders have been tossing these names about an applying them to su= ch diverse sounds for so long that they no longer hold ANY meaning for me. To give stops such intricate names might help some substandard builders = get contracts, but it doesn't help me a whit. It's silly (and a little derogatory) to think that the performer needs such details printed on the stopfaces in order to use them in concert or worship. One is almost temp= ted to believe that the builders expect the organists to sit down and draw th= e stops in concert without first having heard them during practice! The above named ranks mean nothing more than "Flute". Aside from the pos= sible exceptions of modifying terms such as "Major" or "Minor" used to distingu= ish multiple flutes in one division, no further explanation is necessary. Th= e voice of the stop will speak for itself and the organist will use it acco= rdingly.   > If, for instance, you had > in one division of the organ, a very bright, fiery trumpet, you could > designate that one as "Trompette", to indicate a bright, fiery French > sounding reed. Then if you had one in another division that was a > little less forward, it could be called the old english "Trumpet", to > distinguish between the two. I'm more partial to Dom Bedos' and Cavaill=E9-Coll's solution here.   1st Trumpet 2nd Trumpet   No further forays into linguistic sorcery need be necessary! Again, you= 're relying on the printed stop name to speak for the stop itself. If the vo= icers are on the ball, the rank will speak for itself without any assistance fr= om the paper spec.   > Besides, what other name would you give to > a "Trompette en Chamade"? Given the type of stop it is, "Horizontal > Trumpet" just doesn't cut it!   (quoth the bard...)   O Chamade, Chamade, wherefore art thou Chamade? Deny thy builder and refuse thy name! 'Tis but thy name that is my enemy;... What's in a name? that which we call a Chamade By any other name would honk just as loud; So Chamade would, were he not Chamade call'd, Retain that stentorian ear-splitting blast he owes   OK, so that got a little carried away. But who says that the English wo= rd "Trumpet" can't cut the mustard here? Why not simply refer to it as the "Major Trumpet" to distinguish it from the vertical trumpet inside the ca= se? Given the giant and majestic nature of the organ, it's tempting to try t= o reflect that grandeur in the paper stoplist. In the end, this serves nob= ody save the cheap, slipshod builder who is able to convince a church financ= e committee that his "Lieblich Holzgedackt" has in some way more merit than another builder's "Flute". As an undergraduate, I used to drool over printed stoplists and relished= the cheap thrill of fantasizing about the pretty names that builders had inve= nted. Now that I'm out playing, I'm more concerned for the sound of the instru= ment, and not the names on paper.   Simplify, Simplify, Simplify   Robert Horton - GTA, University of Kansas http://falcon.cc.ukans.edu/~gemshorn/   "A fine is a tax for doing wrong... A tax is a fine for doing well."  
(back) Subject: Re: Too much stop information From: <Quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 10:46:52 -0800       Robert Horton wrote:   > Beyond being truthful, let's aim for simple. > Brewse mentioned an interest in names such as Chimney Flute and = Spire Flute > which address elements of the pipes' construction. Sorry Bruce, as a > performer I don't really care how the pipes are made--I have only to = deal with > the sounds they produce! Rohrfl=F6te, Flauto d'amore, Gross Flute, = Piccolo, > Hellfl=F6te, Bourdon, Gedackt, Koppelfl=F6te, Fl=FBte =E0 chemin=E9e, = Doppelfl=F6te, > etc...builders have been tossing these names about an applying them to = such > diverse sounds for so long that they no longer hold ANY meaning for me.   BUT (he sputtered) if I want a Quintadena I shouldn't have to go through = every "flute" stop in the organ to discover whether there IS one or not ... ditto a = Gross Flute or a Bourdon or a Harmonic Flute or a Double Flute (if you will) ... all of = which have VASTLY differing functions in the literature.   > The above named ranks mean nothing more than "Flute". Aside from the = possible > exceptions of modifying terms such as "Major" or "Minor" used to = distinguish > multiple flutes in one division, no further explanation is necessary. = The > voice of the stop will speak for itself and the organist will use it = accordingly.   Yeah, but it would be NICE to have a little HELP ... sure, it doesn't = matter on the organ you play every Sunday ... you KNOW what those flutes are from having to = climb around them to tune the reeds on Saturday night (grin) ... but on an organ of any size = you DO need to be able to differentiate between the basic types of flute stops, to wit:   Stopped wooden flute Stopped metal flute Wooden chimney flute with pierced stoppers Metal chimney flute Tapered wooden flute - E.M. Skinner used to build those Tapered metal flute Open wood flute Open metal flute Wooden harmonic flute - fav of Hook & Hastings for a Solo Organ Metal harmonic flute Wooden double flute (I've never seen a metal double flute, but they may exist) Tibia (grin) Hybrids - Quintadena, etc.   > > If, for instance, you had > > in one division of the organ, a very bright, fiery trumpet, you could > > designate that one as "Trompette", to indicate a bright, fiery French > > sounding reed. Then if you had one in another division that was a > > little less forward, it could be called the old english "Trumpet", to > > distinguish between the two. > I'm more partial to Dom Bedos' and Cavaill=E9-Coll's solution = here. > > 1st Trumpet > 2nd Trumpet > > No further forays into linguistic sorcery need be necessary! = Again, you're > relying on the printed stop name to speak for the stop itself. If the = voicers > are on the ball, the rank will speak for itself without any assistance = from > the paper spec.   I'd go a LEETLE bit further:   French Trumpet German Trumpet English Tromba   which Skinner used to do.   > > Besides, what other name would you give to > > a "Trompette en Chamade"? Given the type of stop it is, "Horizontal > > Trumpet" just doesn't cut it! > > (quoth the bard...) > > O Chamade, Chamade, wherefore art thou Chamade? > Deny thy builder and refuse thy name! > 'Tis but thy name that is my enemy;... > What's in a name? that which we call a Chamade > By any other name would honk just as loud; > So Chamade would, were he not Chamade call'd, > Retain that stentorian ear-splitting blast he owes > > OK, so that got a little carried away. But who says that the = English word > "Trumpet" can't cut the mustard here? Why not simply refer to it as the > "Major Trumpet" to distinguish it from the vertical trumpet inside the = case?   "Fanfare Trumpet" would do just fine ... All Saints' San Diego had a = "Rector's Trumpet" (prepared for) ... I could have thought of a few (non-musical) uses for = THAT, if it had been present (evil grin) ... I only stayed at All Saints' nine months = (grin).   > > Given the giant and majestic nature of the organ, it's tempting = to try to > reflect that grandeur in the paper stoplist. In the end, this serves = nobody > save the cheap, slipshod builder who is able to convince a church = finance > committee that his "Lieblich Holzgedackt" has in some way more merit = than > another builder's "Flute". > As an undergraduate, I used to drool over printed stoplists and = relished the > cheap thrill of fantasizing about the pretty names that builders had = invented. > Now that I'm out playing, I'm more concerned for the sound of the = instrument, > and not the names on paper. > > Simplify, Simplify, Simplify > > Robert Horton - GTA, University of Kansas > http://falcon.cc.ukans.edu/~gemshorn/ >   Agreed, agreed, agreed ... but I DO need SOME information other than = generic "Flute 8', Flute 4'", etc. ... and I wouldn't expect a "Harmonic Trumpet" in the = Swell to behave the same way as a "Cornopean".   The argument has been made that using French, German, etc. nomenclature = reflects the voicing ... if you're gonna use it, it SHOULD; but most of the time it = doesn't. I can think of a particularly UGLY cathedral organ where they slapped fancy = names on some undistinguished pipe-work, and, voila! a French cathedral organ. NOT! = Better to specify in the CONTRACT "French shallots", etc.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: Too much stop information From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 12:02:30   At 11:33 AM 2/29/2000 -0600, you wrote:   >Brewse mentioned an interest in names such as Chimney Flute and >Spire Flute which address elements of the pipes' construction. Sorry >Bruce, as a performer I don't really care how the pipes are made--I have >only to deal with the sounds they produce!<...and so on...snip>   Perhaps this is one of the products of the many that Hope-Jones and associates, during their made foray into organ design, that made real sense...the console and its nomenclature. On the horseshoe-shaped rails were convenient tongue tabs, on which was large font of the stop's basic quality and its pitch. The "foo-foo" names were in italicized, smaller text at the top...not necessary during performance. Although, in classical circles, Hope-Jones' total unification and absurd tonal abberations were quickly swept away as early as the 1930's (except, of course, in the arena of the theater organ, a separate entity entirely), the big old gaudy horseshoe console seems to me to be something of value. It's comfortable to play, all stops are a finger's flick away in an ergonomically and logically placed fashion, and you can actually read them "on the fly". Nothing is dumber than the "faux" drawknobs of this century, with goofy stop names caved in them in small, unreadable text. There is absolutely no reason, other than historically-driven aesthetics, to have them!   >I'm more partial to Dom Bedos' and Cavaill=E9-Coll's solution here. > >1st Trumpet >2nd Trumpet > >No further forays into linguistic sorcery need be necessary!<snip>   Too logical. Organ people, by and large, tend to depart from logic a lot. Hence, we have have "drawknobs" that do nothing but make and break switch contacts! ("Kontaacts" on pseudo-Dutch organs, I would surmise.) However, if the designators "1st" and "2nd" refer only to dynamic level, what is there to figure out what they're at least supposed to sound like?   >Again, you're relying on the printed stop name to speak for the stop itself. <snip>   Well, if there WERE any standardization in the industry, of which there are only console dimensions, and those get stretched here and there, one could depend on nominclature to have a reasonable expenctation of what one is about to draw. My experience shows me that this is variable from builder to builder, and indeed from installation to installation of the same builder. When playing for the very first time on an organ without benefit of a prior workout, one takes one's shot and takes one's chances...and usually winds up with a hole or two in one's feet!   >> Besides, what other name would you give to >> a "Trompette en Chamade"? Given the type of stop it is, "Horizontal >> Trumpet" just doesn't cut it!   <snipping some bad Shakespeare allegory>   >OK, so that got a little carried away.<snip>   No kidding!   >But who says that the English word "Trumpet" can't cut the mustard >here? Why not simply refer to it as the "Major Trumpet" to distinguish it from the vertical trumpet inside the case?<snip>   "En Chamade" is the key here; I think this designation is pretty necessary!   >Simplify, Simplify, Simplify<snip>   ....and Hope-Jones' console did that, in a rather complex sort of way. STR 8', FLUTE 8', TIB 4', DIA 8'...you KNOW what they're going to sound like. Also, the mass production of WurliTzer ranks had a lot to do with what expectations the performer had when activating these stops. In all fairness, though, there are substantial differences between a H=F6lzgedackt and a Bourdon...enough to tell me that one might be a better choice than the other for a particular usage. Thus, I need that information, also.   So, there's need for both simplification and specificity here. My primary gripe is the silliness of using drawbars in this electric age. Sure, they look neat, especially to the uninitiated, but in performance, they're a PITA. Kilgen, Austin, even Holtkamp and many others used tongue tab consoles of considerably better ergonomic functionality than those nice old Skinner consoles and others with their anachornistic, unreadable knobs. The unremarked Ohio builder, Hillgreen and Lane, used the "horseshoe" in almost all of their organs well into the '50s. Still, they lacked the bold text and footage of the Mighty One, which is a considerable aid...especially as one gets older! One might decry the tabs' colorations, as did Skinner, in referring to them as "displays of goods in a market". Well, fine, but Skinner's old mock C-C terraced jobs were the ultimate PITA to play, too!   DeserTBoB   "Americans have no right to bitch about taxes. They pay less per unit of income than people in any other industrialized nation on earth."  
(back) Subject: Re: Too much stop information From: <Rohrschok502@cs.com> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 15:28:54 EST   >Sorry Bruce, as a performer I don't really care how the pipes are made--I=20 have only to > deal with the sounds they produce! =20 Well, that is the reason for the names. As a performer, you are also an=20 organist, so you should know the construction of the pipe as this is WHY the= =20 pipe makes the sound it does: Rohrfl=F6te, Chimney Flute, Flute a Cheminee - has its particular sound BECA= USE=20 of the chimney. The name on the knob should alert you to this so that you=20 know what to expect. It also helps to know construction of the pipe to=20 assist you in intelligently, as opposed to randomly, combining sounds.   >...builders have been tossing these names about an applying them to such=20 diverse > sounds for so long that they no longer hold ANY meaning for me. Ah! But don't throw out the baby with the bath water. Just because some=20 builders use little or no integrity in their nomenclature doesn't mean that=20 you should abandon the system. Otherwise we will be left with only about te= n=20 names to deal with, and will have to sit at the console like amateur ninnies= =20 holding one key as we "test" the voices by pulling stop by stop by stop by=20 stop by stop by stop by stop by stop by stop by stop until we have sampled=20 the entire instrument.   > BUT (he sputtered) if I want a Quintadena I shouldn't have to go through=20 every "flute" > stop in the organ to discover whether there IS one or not ... ditto a=20 Gross Flute or a > Bourdon or a Harmonic Flute or a Double Flute (if you will) ... all of=20 which have > VASTLY differing functions in the literature. > The above named ranks mean nothing more than "Flute".=20 Not so! The names indicate subtle differences in tonal character, and in=20 some cases volume. EVERY organist should not only be familiar with the=20 names and construction, but the sounds as well. You should be able to come= =20 close to identifying the construction of a pipe by the sound of it.   > Yeah, but it would be NICE to have a little HELP ... sure, it doesn't=20 matter=20 > on the organ you play every Sunday ... snip ... but on an organ of any siz= e=20 you DO > need to be able to differentiate between the basic types of flute stops, t= o=20 wit: =20 > Stopped wooden flute or Stopped metal flute Either of these can be named Bourdon or Gedeckt, much as a Principal can be=20 made of either wood or metal. Generally speaking, it is assumed that pipe= s=20 are made of metal, except in a few cases (large bass pipes, 16 Bourdon for=20 example), so it has been customary to indicate deviances from this, ie,=20 HOLZbourdon, HOLZgedeckt, Bourdon en bois, etc. > Wooden chimney flute with pierced stoppers this should indicate a Flute d' Amour to be distinguished from its metal=20 counterpart: Metal chimney flute > Tapered wooden flute or Tapered metal flute > Open wood flute or Open metal flute > Wooden harmonic flute or Metal harmonic flute > Wooden double flute or metal double flute > Tibia (grin) smirk! Whether a pipe is wood or metal make a very subtle difference in the tone,=20 less than the shape and scale of the pipe so the names would not be too far=20 off so as to still be reliable. > Hybrids - Quintadena, etc. Fanciful or semi-fanciful stops need to be "sampled" to an extent, as the=20 AEoline. =20 >I'm more partial to Dom Bedos' and Cavaill=E9-Coll's solution here. > 1st Trumpet, 2nd Trumpet Unfortunately, 1st and 2nd typically have indicated no, or little, change in= =20 colour, but rather change in volume. My understand of 1st and 2nd=20 Trompettes is that they are basically the same colour just at different=20 volume/intensity.   > Again, you're relying on the printed stop name to speak for the stop=20 itself. If the=20 > voicers are on the ball, the rank will speak for itself without any=20 assistance=20 > from the paper spec. But you need the visual clue or else you might as well have blank knobs, and= =20 just grab and hope!   > French Trumpet, German Trumpet, English Tromba Hey! What happened to the English Trumpet?? Why not simple write=20 Trompette, Trompet and Trumpet on the knob. A Tromba is a different color=20 from a Trumpet, as is a Cornopean or Tuba.   > Besides, what other name would you give to a "Trompette en Chamade"? Give= n=20 the type of stop it is, "Horizontal Trumpet" just doesn't cut it!   > (quoth the bard...)   > O Chamade, Chamade, wherefore art thou Chamade? > Deny thy builder and refuse thy name! > 'Tis but thy name that is my enemy;... > What's in a name? that which we call a Chamade > By any other name would honk just as loud; > So Chamade would, were he not Chamade call'd, > Retain that stentorian ear-splitting blast he owes > OK, so that got a little carried away. But who says that the=20 > English word > "Trumpet" can't cut the mustard here? Why not simply refer to it as the > "Major Trumpet" to distinguish it from the vertical trumpet inside the cas= e? and call the octave to it a TubaFour! =20   > Now that I'm out playing, I'm more concerned for the sound of the=20 instrument, > and not the names on paper. Simplify, Simplify, Simplify But you still need the descriptive names unless just any old flute will do.=20= =20 ;-)  
(back) Subject: Stops and how to handle 'em From: <Quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 13:12:39 -0800   Bob brings up another interesting point: drawknob bomber cockpit consoles = are pretty to look at (in the opinion of some, at least), but they're almost totally dependent on registration-by-pistons in an organ of any size; hand-registering in "chunks" is out of the question. Is there REALLY any = reason to build them, other than (imagined) prestige and/or nostalgia? Some of = those old Skinners were big enough to bury me in STANDING UP (grin).   I always found the minimalist Holtkamp and Schlicker consoles to be the = easiest to manipulate, with Austin running a close second. I played some horseshoe Hillgreen-Lanes in Ohio, but didn't care for having to swivel to look at = the stops ... partially because of eyesight.   I also find the Allen Protege technology (lighted rocker tabs that don't = move when you press a piston) easy to use, if they'd just make them a little = bit bigger a la Schlicker ... the biggest attraction THERE is the SILENT combination action, which is also a lot cheaper to build. And, you can = actually SEE OVER a four-manual Protege console (!).   Of course, trackers with mechanical stop action HAVE to have drawknobs, = but how about pneumatic slider motors (for those who prefer not to get involved = with electricity)? THEN you could have whatever you wanted for stop controls = ... even an Estey "chime" keyboard (grin).   Cheers,   Bud        
(back) Subject: Re: Too much stop information From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 18:46:27 EST   In a message dated 2/29/00 3:07:55 PM Eastern Standard Time, desertbob@rglobal.net writes:   > Perhaps this is one of the products of the many that Hope-Jones and > associates, during their made foray into organ design, that made real > sense...the console and its nomenclature. On the horseshoe-shaped = rails > were convenient tongue tabs, on which was large font of the stop's = basic > quality and its pitch. The main problem I have with horseshoe consoles is that the music rack is = too far away and usually too high for me. I find it easier to find knobs in = a hurry when they are not as close together as tabs are. And I am one of those people who prefers the appearance of drawknobs just as a matter of prinzipal, despite my love for Schpinnettes.    
(back) Subject: Re: Too much stop information From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 15:59:31   At 06:46 PM 2/29/2000 EST, you wrote: >In a message dated 2/29/00 3:07:55 PM Eastern Standard Time,=20 >desertbob@rglobal.net writes:   >I find it easier to find knobs in a hurry when they are not as close >together as tabs are.<snip>   Brewse brings up a good point. If you're fatfingered or careless of aim, tongue tabs can give you unpredictable results! Fortunatly, do to the standardized (well, generally) layout of stops using these devices, you won't necessarily pull a 16' Bombarde instead of an 8' Bourdon! An old axiom of theater organists is "just grab and handfull"...point in the general area of tonality and footage that you want, and you won't be too far off.   In fairness, much standardization of drawknob layout has occurred, but them some doofuses put couplers into the mix!! I thought the best arrangement for drawknobs was that found on most GDH's and many M=F6llers...stops on the knobs in rising footage going upward, couplers on a tilt tab rail.   >And I am one of those people who prefers the appearance of drawknobs >just as a matter of prinzipal, despite my love for Schpinnettes.<snip>   What Brewse is saying here is that his REAL favorite is those lurrrrvly horizontal tilt tabs...in a veritable rainbow of colors...'specially da ones dat control da "FunMachine"!   hehehehehehehe!   DeserTBawB