PipeChat Digest #1285 - Tuesday, February 29, 2000
 
Re: Stops and how to handle 'em
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
facades, etc.
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Re: Stops and how to handle 'em
  by "ldpatte@attglobal.net" <ldpatte@attglobal.net>
Re: Stops and how to handle 'em
  by "Jason McGuire" <jason@johannus-norcal.com>
Re: Stops and how to handle 'em
  by <Quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Hymns in Public
  by "Charles Wertalik" <wertzl@earthlink.net>
Re: facades, etc.
  by "Rick \"OrganPlayer\" Locher" <rick.locher@gte.net>
Re: Too much stop information
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Stops and how to handle 'em
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Stops and how to handle 'em
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Stops and how to handle 'em
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Stops and how to handle 'em
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Fw: facades, etc.
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Stops and how to handle 'em
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Stops and how to handle 'em
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Too much stop information
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Stops and how to handle 'em
  by "Brent Johnson" <bmjohns@fgi.net>
 



(back) Subject: Re: Stops and how to handle 'em From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 19:08:20 -0600   At 2/29/00 01:12 PM, Bud wrote: >Bob brings up another interesting point: drawknob bomber cockpit consoles = are >pretty to look at (in the opinion of some, at least), but they're almost >totally dependent on registration-by-pistons in an organ of any size; >hand-registering in "chunks" is out of the question. Is there REALLY any reason >to build them, other than (imagined) prestige and/or nostalgia? Some of = those >old Skinners were big enough to bury me in STANDING UP (grin). > >I always found the minimalist Holtkamp and Schlicker consoles to be the easiest >to manipulate, with Austin running a close second. I played some = horseshoe >Hillgreen-Lanes in Ohio, but didn't care for having to swivel to look at = the >stops ... partially because of eyesight. <snip>   Dear Bud, and Bob (et al) --   What better reason does one need to design and build a drawknob console = but for the elegance thereof? Is there no common sense involved in the idea = of "making an organ *look* like an organ"? After all, this is an instrument with its basis in centuries-old tradition (of mechanism, design, literature, tonality, etc)...I can't for the life of me understand why anyone would want it to look differently. (especially someone laying out hundreds of thousands of dollars to purchase one!) In the realm of the theatre-organ, the horseshoe console was developed to fill a need quite different than that of a church or concert organ -- and it does so, as intended.   Now...(before you all start to light the fires...<G>) I must admit that there does come a point at which great numbers of drawknobs could *possibly* become cumbersome. The development of the stoptab or rocker type control also dealt with this problem handily (whether multi-colored = or not). Modern action designs have also allowed this to be less of a problem, even with large DK consoles, as there is no longer a need for the associated bulky pneumatic systems to move the knobs. Truthfully, though, how many organs are built in these modern times where the funds are so unlimited as to allow such mammoth specifications?? As to "hand-registering in chunks"...any well-designed drawknob console that = I've seen has the knobs laid out such that one CAN, in fact, grab several at once -- and, also, laid out such that the likely "chunks" (Sw reeds, for instance) are grouped together, for just this possibility. True, you = can't "swat at the stops with a rolled-up newspaper" (sorry -- that was another thread awhile back) but the question remains "should you really WANT = to"??? Why is it such a poor idea to want to use the combination action?? (NOTE -- I did not say "abuse" it...)   As to the "minimalist" console design...hmmm...I guess this is where the true "opinion" comes into play. I, myself, think that the things are frightfully butt-ugly -- no matter how much "easier" they purportedly are to "manipulate". I also think they look cheap. (and, in fact, they ARE a great deal cheaper to build than a comparable DK console, so why shouldn't they look so??) The only thing uglier, in my opinion, is the modern scourge of rows and rows of square light-up pushbuttons. (did someone say something about a "bomber cockpit"? I've never seen a bomber cockpit with drawknobs...) Gads!!   Well, I suppose that's enough for now -- "That's my opinion, and I'm stickin' to it!!" There's much more that could be said, but I'll wait to see where y'all go with this much.   Cheers!   Tim (unabashedly a traditionalist in such matters)            
(back) Subject: facades, etc. From: <KriderSM@aol.com> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 20:58:48 EST   Concerning names for those horizonal trumpets, the Sanfilippo theatre = organ calls one of theirs, "Bugle Battaglia". ...and does it ever!!!   Stan Krider  
(back) Subject: Re: Stops and how to handle 'em From: "ldpatte@attglobal.net" <ldpatte@attglobal.net> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 21:20:04 -0500       Tim Bovard wrote:   > > > Dear Bud, and Bob (et al) -- > > What better reason does one need to design and build a drawknob console = but > for the elegance thereof? Is there no common sense involved in the idea = of > "making an organ *look* like an organ"? After all, this is an = instrument > with its basis in centuries-old tradition (of mechanism, design, > literature, tonality, etc)...I can't for the life of me understand why > anyone would want it to look differently. (especially someone laying out > hundreds of thousands of dollars to purchase one!) In the realm of the > theatre-organ, the horseshoe console was developed to fill a need quite > different than that of a church or concert organ -- and it does so, as > intended. > > Now...(before you all start to light the fires...<G>) I must admit that > there does come a point at which great numbers of drawknobs could > *possibly* become cumbersome. The development of the stoptab or rocker > type control also dealt with this problem handily (whether multi-colored = or > not). Modern action designs have also allowed this to be less of a > problem, even with large DK consoles, as there is no longer a need for = the > associated bulky pneumatic systems to move the knobs. Truthfully, = though, > how many organs are built in these modern times where the funds are so > unlimited as to allow such mammoth specifications?? As to > "hand-registering in chunks"...any well-designed drawknob console that = I've > seen has the knobs laid out such that one CAN, in fact, grab several at > once -- and, also, laid out such that the likely "chunks" (Sw reeds, for > instance) are grouped together, for just this possibility. True, you = can't > "swat at the stops with a rolled-up newspaper" (sorry -- that was = another > thread awhile back) but the question remains "should you really WANT = to"??? > Why is it such a poor idea to want to use the combination action?? = (NOTE > -- I did not say "abuse" it...) > > As to the "minimalist" console design...hmmm...I guess this is where the > true "opinion" comes into play. I, myself, think that the things are > frightfully butt-ugly -- no matter how much "easier" they purportedly = are > to "manipulate". I also think they look cheap. (and, in fact, they ARE = a > great deal cheaper to build than a comparable DK console, so why = shouldn't > they look so??) The only thing uglier, in my opinion, is the modern > scourge of rows and rows of square light-up pushbuttons. (did someone = say > something about a "bomber cockpit"? I've never seen a bomber cockpit = with > drawknobs...) Gads!! > > Well, I suppose that's enough for now -- "That's my opinion, and I'm > stickin' to it!!" There's much more that could be said, but I'll wait = to > see where y'all go with this much. > > Cheers! > > Tim > (unabashedly a traditionalist in such matters)   Thanks, Tim   My sentiments, exactly. It would seem that the pipe-organ is one of the = few things left that haven't been totally streamlined, cut down, etc. etc. in = the name of modern "progress" or whatever. The pipe-organ is indeed a very = artistic thing, rooted in centuries of development and history. Call me sentimental, = impractical or what-ever; to lose things like draw-knob consoles and to use = plain-jane stop nomenclature would not be a good thing. Might as well throw out the pipes = as well in exchange for electronic tone generators!   I also wanted to clear up some information I had mentioned before, (or = should I say mis-information) in case anyone was interested. The Saint Saens Organ Symphony will in fact be performed at Roy Thompson Hall, not Massey Hall = as I had earlier indicated. There is no Organ at Massey Hall. The one at Roy = Thompson is a Gabriel Kney. (He has since retired and closed up shop in London, = Ontario a couple of years ago, unfortunately). For those who are not aware, one = interesting thing about this organ is its use of two consoles - a tracker console and = a movable electric one on the stage. It also sports plexiglass swell shades = on the Brustwerk and Swell divisions.   Dave C. London, Ont.        
(back) Subject: Re: Stops and how to handle 'em From: "Jason McGuire" <jason@johannus-norcal.com> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 18:14:20 -0800   > > What better reason does one need to design and build a drawknob console = but > for the elegance thereof?   Call me a traditionalist as well, I vote for moving drawknobs and tabs ... they just feel right to me. While it's nice that those who prefer lighted controls can have them, I just don't like lighted drawknobs, lighted tabs, LED tabs, little square lighted push buttons, etc. I've played some large drawknob organs and done hand registrations on them and never felt it was unmanageable. One had 200+ drawknobs and 38 tabs (4 manuals, an Aeolian-Skinner) and that console was the easiest, most enjoyable and most comfortable to play I have ever played. Even with all those drawknobs I = knew where to find what I wanted. Now, Crystal Cathedral might take a while to get used to, but computer memory is cheap these days and dozens or = hundreds of memory levels is easily possible.   Jason    
(back) Subject: Re: Stops and how to handle 'em From: <Quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 18:59:46 -0800       Tim Bovard wrote:   > Dear Bud, and Bob (et al) -- > > What better reason does one need to design and build a drawknob console = but > for the elegance thereof?   I'd rather have that second celeste (grin) ... consoles are exPENsive.   > Is there no common sense involved in the idea of > "making an organ *look* like an organ"? After all, this is an = instrument > with its basis in centuries-old tradition (of mechanism, design, > literature, tonality, etc)...I can't for the life of me understand why > anyone would want it to look differently.   The only thing ANYONE will see from the floor of the nave in new St. = Matthew's is the ORGAN-CASE, and I'm ALL for THAT being traditional ... or maybe not = ... that "You Want Fries With That?" moderne case for Disney Hall was kinda = INTERESTING, and I've seen some KILLER cases in Scandinavia where the pedal towers = looked like hollowed out tree trunks ... but I digress ...   The choir and Yr. Humble Servant will likely be the ONLY ones to ever see = the CONSOLE in the west gallery ... THEY'RE impressed I can find the "Activate = Spin Cycle" (on) switch; I need a console that will allow me to do TWO things: = see over it to direct the choir, and change registrations without sending a "thunk" = echoing down the nave in the middle of High Mass.   > As to the "minimalist" console design...hmmm...I guess this is where the > true "opinion" comes into play. I, myself, think that the things are > frightfully butt-ugly -- no matter how much "easier" they purportedly = are > to "manipulate". I also think they look cheap. (and, in fact, they ARE = a > great deal cheaper to build than a comparable DK console, so why = shouldn't > they look so??)   I beg to differ ... Holtkamp in particular employed some of the leading = designers from both here and abroad to come up with that console, which is = understated elegance and simplicity personified. EVERYTHING is first-class on a = Holtkamp console ... yeah, I know, their ORGANS are out of fashion, but a = generation (mine) learned clean playing on those Holtkamp Martinis at Oberlin (and = elsewhere) ... the best electric-action keyboards I've ever played. And Chick's trackers = aren't too shabby, either ...   What do they lack that a drawknob console has? They have stops, couplers, tremulants, chimes (if you twisted Walter Sr.'s arm), pistons, toe studs, = a swell shoe (sometimes TWO ... feature THAT!) and even an occasional CRESCENDO = Pedal. Everything's where you can SEE it, REACH it, and there's even a place to = pile hymnals and Psalters (grin). The Holtkamp at Vernon de Tar's church even = had the old Skinner Solo organ as the fourth manual.   > The only thing uglier, in my opinion, is the modern > scourge of rows and rows of square light-up pushbuttons.   I suppose Allen COULD make them a little more elegant if you went for a = custom console ...   > (did someone say > something about a "bomber cockpit"? I've never seen a bomber cockpit = with > drawknobs...) Gads!! > > Well, I suppose that's enough for now -- "That's my opinion, and I'm > stickin' to it!!" There's much more that could be said, but I'll wait = to > see where y'all go with this much. > > Cheers! > > Tim > (unabashedly a traditionalist in such matters)   If I get a tracker, I'll have a tracker keydesk, and probably drawstops; = if I get an electric action organ, it will be as quiet and uncluttered as John-Paul = Buzard (or whoever) can make it, and it probably WON'T be drawknobs.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: Hymns in Public From: "Charles Wertalik" <wertzl@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 22:02:51 -0500   Hugh Drogemuller and Phil L: It's VERY true that the term "head," when = used in relation to a ship, does refer to the necessary room, but the origin of the term lies in the LOCATION thereof. Back in the days of sailing ships, the "head" was, in fact, at the bow of the ship (yes, on the outside, = quite exposed to the waves as the ship plowed thru the water), so the action of the bow wave served to cleanse the sides of the ship. Rugged stuff, eh? = Bet no one brought along any reading material!   Guess we've beaten this'n to death.   Chuck   ----- Original Message ----- From: Hugh Drogemuller <lon.hdrogemuller@wwdc.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, February 28, 2000 10:13 PM Subject: Re: Hymns in Public     > At 21:56 28/02/2000 -0500, Chuck wrote: > For those who may care (and that probably includes no one), the proper term > to describe a ship sinking bow-first is: "by the head." > > I thought that "head" when used in the context of a ship referred to = the > same facility as "latrine" in army parlance. > > HD > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: facades, etc. From: "Rick \"OrganPlayer\" Locher" <rick.locher@gte.net> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 21:11:36 -0600   When it came to choosing the nomenclature for our stops, we decided to = call them according to the language of the country which they followed, i.e. French names, German names, English names, etc. And when stops were unified, we kept the same name and just changed the pitch. We have 3 = Eight foot "Trumpets": Festive Trompette (French), Trumpet (English) and = Trompete (German). What makes these resemble these countries are the way the shallots are shaped. By the way, these 3 "Trumpets" are in 3 different divisions. Originally we had 2 trumpets with identical shallots in 2 different divisions. In the new spec we changed one of the English = Trumpet ranks' shallots to German shallots. The Festive Trompette with French shaped shallots is new and is obviously a solo trumpet while the other two are more of a chorus reed type. I've gone on too long. Rick "Organ Player" Locher ----- Original Message ----- From: <ldpatte@attglobal.net> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, February 28, 2000 9:59 PM Subject: facades, etc.     > Well, seeing that everybody is still putting their two cents' worth in, > I might as well add mine. > > We might as well take the French Great (Grande Orgue) principal > designations one step further and mention the appropriate names at each > length. We have already established the fact that the 8' Principal is > usually called "Montre", meaning "show", sometimes whether or not the > rank is actually in the facade. The 4' designation for a principal is > usually "Praestant". Above that, you will quite often find the 2' > Principal on the Grande Orgue designated as "Doublette". > > Recently, some have scowled at the fact that American and Canadian > organs use different languages to designate stops, instead of > exclusively English, (except for in Quebec, where I believe that > Casavant Freres Ltee uses mostly French stop names now), and that other > countries use stop designations using the language of the land. (I am > not implying that this is the practise of all organ builders in Quebec. > There are other very fine ones; I just don't know if they adhere to an > "all French policy" when naming stops. You would think it should be up > to the customer!) Anyway, I suppose there are two schools of thought on > that one. I can see the thought of of using the language of the land as > being valid, but I personally like the idea of using other languages to > designate organ stops, for a few reasons. If you feel, as I do, that > the pipe organ is one of the most artistic and creative things around, > not only musically but aesthetically also, (and probably most people on > Pipechat would), then I think you would agree that English stop > designations sometimes just don't cut it. (Notice I said sometimes). > One instance where I believe this would come in handy is when you have > two stops on an organ of the same type, but which are either voiced or > scaled differently or have a different sound. If, for instance, you had > in one division of the organ, a very bright, fiery trumpet, you could > designate that one as "Trompette", to indicate a bright, fiery French > sounding reed. Then if you had one in another division that was a > little less forward, it could be called the old english "Trumpet", to > distinguish between the two. Besides, what other name would you give to > a "Trompette en Chamade"? Given the type of stop it is, "Horizontal > Trumpet" just doesn't cut it! On the other hand, I do think that we > need to use much thought and take care when we name organ stops. > Sometimes I can't believe the liberties some builders and/or restorers > have taken in naming stops, especially ones that are borrowed or > unified! Any more thoughts on the subject? > > Many thanks to the guys who offered a reply to my recent request about > Saint Saens Organ Symphony. If anyone else is interested, I have found > that it will be performed in Toronto on April 19 & 22 at Massey Hall > (along with some other stuff). Web page is > http://www.www.masseyhall.com/masseyhall/concert/concert01.asp?M=3D4&Y=3D2000 > > Dave C. > London, Ont. > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Too much stop information From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 22:09:39 EST   In a message dated 2/29/00 7:00:02 PM Eastern Standard Time,=20 desertbob@rglobal.net writes:   > In fairness, much standardization of drawknob layout has occurred, but the= m > some doofuses put couplers into the mix!! I thought the best arrangement > for drawknobs was that found on most GDH's and many M=F6llers...stops on=20= the > knobs in rising footage going upward, couplers on a tilt tab rail. > =20 Actually, it would be more convenient IMHO if stops were arranged in=20 choruses, rising upward in footage, with flues below reeds, intramanual=20 couplers, tremolo, chimes, etc. I do like intermanual couplers on tilting=20 tablets or even drawknobs above the top manual.   And, IF the organ must have combination action, I prefer the intermanual=20 couplers not be controlled by divisionals, only generals. (It feels good to get that off my chest!!!)  
(back) Subject: Re: Stops and how to handle 'em From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 19:25:28   At 09:20 PM 2/29/2000 -0500, Don C. wrote: >Might as well throw out the pipes as well >in exchange for electronic tone generators!<snip>   Don't look now, but that's already happened to a great degree.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Stops and how to handle 'em From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 22:46:30 -0500   I have a video of the organist at the Sydney Town Hall in Australia. While playing, he grabs hand-fuls of stops and pulls them out, or "palms" six or eight in- and doesn't miss a beat! The banging of the sliders adds to the instruments' "being alive". And, OY!- those coupled manuals!   Rick      
(back) Subject: Re: Stops and how to handle 'em From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 22:54:10 -0500   The square "light-up" stop push buttons were common on the Estey "cash register" consoles. Given a short someplace, they could really 'light up your life' and flutter your knickers!   Beside theatre organ consoles, my next fave is the Aeoline cascading side-rocker tab consoles- with the roll-player box in the middle.   Rick      
(back) Subject: Re: Stops and how to handle 'em From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 22:59:25 -0400   Jason wrote: I vote for moving drawknobs and tabs ... >they just feel right to me..... I've played some large >drawknob organs and done hand registrations on them and never felt it was >unmanageable. One had 200+ drawknobs and 38 tabs (4 manuals, an >Aeolian-Skinner) and that console was the easiest, most enjoyable and = most >comfortable to play I have ever played. Even with all those drawknobs I = knew >where to find what I wanted.   Seems I can recall reading that the first thing Edwin Lemare did when he sat at the console was to take out his silk handkerchief and polish the drawknobs. That he was a master at choreographing the reach-without-looking method for changing stops and that he changed them constantly, every couple of measures or so.   Are there principles involved in the lay-out of drawknobs, beyond the obvious (16's below 8's below 4's and voix celeste right next to viole)?   Randy Runyon organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Fw: facades, etc. From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 22:57:07 -0500   The 4m 42r Wurli at the Paramount Music Palace in Indy had their horny Battaglia up in the balcony. Pity those pizza-eaters who didn't realize it was there!   Rick   ----- Original Message ----- From: <KriderSM@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, February 29, 2000 8:58 PM Subject: facades, etc.     > Concerning names for those horizonal trumpets, the Sanfilippo theatre organ > calls one of theirs, "Bugle Battaglia". ...and does it ever!!! > > Stan Krider > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >      
(back) Subject: Re: Stops and how to handle 'em From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 19:58:01   At 06:59 PM 2/29/2000 -0800, Budgie the Dinosaur at St. Matt's-by-the-Burger King wrote:   >I beg to differ ... Holtkamp in particular employed some of the leading designers >from both here and abroad to come up with that console, which is = understated >elegance and simplicity personified. EVERYTHING is first-class on a = Holtkamp >console ... yeah, I know, their ORGANS are out of fashion, but a generation >(mine) learned clean playing on those Holtkamp Martinis at Oberlin (and >elsewhere) ... the best electric-action keyboards I've ever played.<snip>   Bud's 100% correct, on the console issue, at least. Walter, Sr.'s product was first drawer in every respect. Where I do differ is that his organs are "out of date". I disagree. Walter's organs were built upon sound tonal principles and sound as good and fresh today as they did then. = Sure, they don't give you that "MushMaster Deluxe" turn-of-the-century dreck = that is ominously creeping back into popularity nowadays, but they are indeed well-designed and voiced instruments.   DeserTBoB      
(back) Subject: Re: Stops and how to handle 'em From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 23:12:49 EST   In a message dated 2/29/00 10:57:19 PM Eastern Standard Time, runyonr@muohio.edu writes:   > Are there principles involved in the lay-out of drawknobs, beyond the > obvious (16's below 8's below 4's and voix celeste right next to = viole)? > Last time I was in on console design, the beginning rule of thumb was to arrange the knobs beginning at the lower left with the 16 flue, then continuing in list order moving left to right, then up to the next level, =   left to right, etc. After this general layout was done knobs were then slightly altered in location for convenience; ie, putting the Celeste next = to the companion rank, 16 8 4 reeds so that the reed chorus could be drawn =   easily, which might involve switching the order of the Trumpet and Oboe = for instance. Other considerations involved placing choruses together or mutations with flutes rather than strings.  
(back) Subject: Re: Too much stop information From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 23:13:27 -0500   Hey Bruce-   If the music rack in too high on theatre organ consoles, get a hydraulic bench-top raiser- and use yer seat belt! I too have the same problem on instruments of 3 manuals or more: I'm a little guy..........and the music rack is waaaaaaayyyyy up there!   The old console at Longwood Gardens is beautiful in that, the top of the music rack was even with the top of the console. It was sorta like "sunk" = in there just above the top manual.   Rick      
(back) Subject: Re: Stops and how to handle 'em From: "Brent Johnson" <bmjohns@fgi.net> Date: Tue, 29 Feb 2000 22:19:22 -0600   Regarding drawknobs & tabs... This exact topic was in my head this morning. I was wiring stoptabs, thinking how much easier they are to deal with on the backside compared to drawknobs, although I do prefer the look and feel of a drawknob console. Then I wondered who first put stoptabs on an organ? I assumed it would have been one of the innovators of electro-pneumatic action. Someone familiar with designing electric circuits knew all that = was needed to operate a stop was a simple switch instead of a large, = cumbersome, space-consuming knob. Then the thought occurred to me: Who missed drawknobs on EP, DE, and electric organs so much that they made electric ones? ??? Brent Johnson The Organ Web Ring http://www.organwebring.com brent@organwebring.com     Another Random Thought: A hammond with sidejambs and labeled drawknobs = that function exactly like drawbars!       ----- Original Message ----- From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, February 29, 2000 7:08 PM Subject: Re: Stops and how to handle 'em     > Dear Bud, and Bob (et al) -- > > What better reason does one need to design and build a drawknob console but > for the elegance thereof? Is there no common sense involved in the idea of > "making an organ *look* like an organ"? After all, this is an = instrument > with its basis in centuries-old tradition (of mechanism, design, > literature, tonality, etc)...I can't for the life of me understand why > anyone would want it to look differently. (especially someone laying out > hundreds of thousands of dollars to purchase one!) In the realm of the > theatre-organ, the horseshoe console was developed to fill a need quite > different than that of a church or concert organ -- and it does so, as > intended.