PipeChat Digest #1216 - Thursday, January 6, 2000
 
Re: Dulciana Cornet
  by "Chris Baker" <cembalist@chorale.demon.co.uk>
What is an enthusiast to do? (Cross Post)
  by "Grandstaff, Larry P." <grandslp@smxcorp.com>
Re: What is an enthusiast to do? (Cross Post)
  by "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com>
Crosspost - Thanks
  by "Brent Johnson" <bmjohns@fgi.net>
Jeux Soundfonts
  by <FiveManual@aol.com>
Improvisation
  by "Irwin Franklin" <irwinfranklin@yahoo.com>
General Music Corp?
  by <Oboe32@aol.com>
Re: General Music Corp?
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Improvisation
  by "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net>
joint AGO/COTOS meeting
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Tapered Flue Timbres (was Re: Dulciana Cornet)
  by <Sepp123@aol.com>
 



(back) Subject: Re: Dulciana Cornet From: "Chris Baker" <cembalist@chorale.demon.co.uk> Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2000 11:18:23 +0000   William writes:   >I Have an early 20th century Dolce built by Hook and Hastings, It is more =   >like a Dulciana with a 1/5 mouth, instead of 1/4. I remember reading = that a >Dolcan has a reverse taper. I have heard stops labeled Dolcan at Church = of >the Advent here is Boston, MA and also at the Cathedral Church of St. = Peter >and Paul in Boston. It sounded like a dulciana with a touch of = spitzflute. >Both organs are Aeolian Skinners and both have a celeste to that rank. > >Any comments?   Hi, In English useage, the true Dolce (being the soft metal,reverse tapered pipe) is also called Dolcan, or Flauto Dolce. Having been introduced in the mid-18th century, it found brief fame when championed by Schultz in the 1860's. But generally, by the beginning of the 20th century, it was not being included to any great extent in new English work. The virtual 'mass-production' of small to medium two- manual, plus Bourdon pedal instruments which occurred at the end of the 19th century, and through to the 1930's, more or less saw the end of the Dolce, due to its requirement for space. The name Dolce however seemed to continue, both as a descriptive, and sometimes as a false nomenclature for an untapered Dulciana style small diapason.   If the two Dolcan stops you mention do indeed have a 'touch of Spitzflote' about them, then from the English perspective, this would represent a considerable tonal incongruity. Spitzflote tone, being for all intents and purposes a Gemshorn, is produced from a 'normal' taper. These sounds are difficult to describe, but we could regard the Spitzflote as a small horn-diapason, whilst the Dolce should never exceed horn-flute. In both cases, the 'horn' element is slight, but in the Spitzflote it leans to the very harmonic diapason sound, and in the Dolce, leans to the suppressed-harmonics flute sound.   Having said all that, two organists discussing pipe sounds across an ocean, is probably the definitive futility. Even were we in the same room listening to the same organ, we would hear sounds differently. Although undeniably true that American organ building is rooted in skills which crossed the Atlantic in the first place, the American craft has developed in a much more exuberant, exciting and innovative way than its elderly European relatives. It is no surprise therefore that stop nomenclatures and tonal conventions are (quite rightly) sometimes of secondary importance to the effect the builder wishes to create.   Regards, Chris. -- Chris Baker  
(back) Subject: What is an enthusiast to do? (Cross Post) From: "Grandstaff, Larry P." <grandslp@smxcorp.com> Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2000 10:14:10 -0500   Good morning everyone,   I am usually a lurker on these mail lists, trying to learn as much as I = can from the vast experience of the people in the organ business. It has stirred my interest and helped me with many of my problems. But this morning I come to the lists with a complaint.   I have played and enjoyed the organ since I was in high school. After the children had left home, I found I have more time to not only play the = organ but to build and restore organs for my own use. Over the years this has turned into a hobby that I will enjoy until the day I die. There is only one problem that I have continually run up against while pursuing this hobby.   "Buying Parts!!"   Because this is a hobby and I am not a professional builder, this is the normal response I receive.   "Our price list is primarily intended for those in the pipe-organ building and servicing profession; therefor we ordinarily ask that retail customers consult with their local pipe organ professional. From time to time non-qualified persons show up and create situations, which damage the reputation of the pipe organ industry, and create warranty/liability problems for legitimate business and technical professionals. We feel a need to know with whom we are doing business."   I am not a wealthy person, putting a middle guy between me and the manufacture just adds more cost and problems to something that is supposed to be fun.   WHAT IS AN ENTHUSIAST TO DO???   Regards, Larry Grandstaff Pipe Dreams Farm grandslp@smxcorp.com    
(back) Subject: Re: What is an enthusiast to do? (Cross Post) From: "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com> Date: Wed, 05 Jan 2000 10:54:25 -0500       "Grandstaff, Larry P." wrote: > > > "Our price list is primarily intended for those in the pipe-organ = building > and servicing profession; therefor we ordinarily ask that retail = customers > consult with their local pipe organ professional. From time to time > non-qualified persons show up and create situations, which damage the > reputation of the pipe organ industry, and create warranty/liability > problems for legitimate business and technical professionals. We feel a > need to know with whom we are doing business." > > Actually, this piece of drek is from Organ Supply Industries and as near = as I've found they are the only people in the industry with this "attitude." While OSI is probably the most compreshensive source you might try the = following: ft operand.     http://www.syndyne.com/ http://www.klannorgan.com/ http://hometown.aol.com/prestant16/prof/index.htm http://www.cluff.net/used.htm   Syndyne sent me a catalog. The rest have theirs online.  
(back) Subject: Crosspost - Thanks From: "Brent Johnson" <bmjohns@fgi.net> Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2000 12:33:05 -0600   Thanks to those of you who helped me find the dates of various organists I was looking for. I'll share with you the results... Dan Nealon of Paris, Tennessee donated a surprising collection of = autographs to the Wicks Organ Company some time ago. They have recently been put on display in the shop. Autographs include those of (off the top of my head) Louis Vierne, Max Reger, Cesar Franck, T. Tertius Noble, Marcel Dupre, and others I can't remember at the time. There's more information on the = Wicks web site. Go to http://www.wicks.com/organ and click on News. Thanks again. Brent Johnson    
(back) Subject: Jeux Soundfonts From: <FiveManual@aol.com> Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2000 19:20:17 EST   Could someone please give me the web address where these soundfonts = reside? Thanks!  
(back) Subject: Improvisation From: "Irwin Franklin" <irwinfranklin@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2000 16:22:37 -0800 (PST)   For Christmas, my Priest gave me a wonderful recording of improvisations by Cochereau. I have listened to these amazing improvs with great delight. I wonder if those on this list who improvise would be willing to share the improvisation tricks, or should I say, techniques, that have worked for them.   Tom Ed Moore University of North Alabama   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Talk to your friends online with Yahoo! Messenger. http://im.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: General Music Corp? From: <Oboe32@aol.com> Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2000 22:53:20 EST   Hey all, I am keyboard shopping for my dorm room at school, and I was = curious about general Music Corporation and if anyone has a keyboard by them. I = also very much need their web address if anyone has it. It would also help if anyone has any suggestions about buying a keyboard and what it should have = in it as needed for an organist/pianist/jazz guy. thanx for any help, please send comments my way!   Pete Isherwood  
(back) Subject: Re: General Music Corp? From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2000 23:25:10 -0500   Radio Shack has a very decent keyboard for around $500.00. A friend owns a Shack dealership in Rushville, Indiana and I've played it many times. Tho no foot pedals, it does have excellent pianos, jazz organs, lots of percussion, and a European pop rhythm thingy that just gets ya goin'! My fave sound is the honky-tonky pie-anna.   Don't call me Biggs, Rick      
(back) Subject: Re: Improvisation From: "bruce cornely" <rohrschok8@webtv.net> Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2000 23:33:11 -0500 (EST)     >For Christmas, my Priest gave me a wonderful > recording of improvisations by Cochereau. I > have listened to these amazing improvs with > great delight. I wonder if those on this list who > improvise would be willing to share the > improvisation tricks, or should I say, > techniques, that have worked for them. There are two very essential ways to improve your improvisation skills. First listen to as many improvisations and improvisors as possible. Second, improvise -- privately and publicly; a great part of improvisation is the excitement/stress of the moment.   Of course, underlying the improvisation skill is the knowledge of theory, harmony and counterpoint. The only keyboard activity I can think of which rivals the excitement and satisfaction of improvisation, other than hymn playing, is playing great literature from memory.   Go for it, and good luck.   bruce cornely ~:~:~ rohrschok8@webtv.net gainesville, florida    
(back) Subject: joint AGO/COTOS meeting From: <KriderSM@aol.com> Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2000 00:25:25 EST   The following letter appeared in "The Guilder," the newsletter of the Columbus Chapter, American Guild of Organists. The letter, written by Columbus Chapter, AGO Dean, Ron Kenreich, refers to a joint AGO/COTOS membership meeting, the second joint meeting.   Stan Krider   <Snip> From the Dean:   Did you know that she pilots a plane and rides a motorcycle? She also = teaches music in a school, is a church organist, directs church choirs and feeds = her mules each day! Yes, Patty Immell does all this in addition to playing theatre organ. We are grateful to Patty for traveling here from = Chillicothe to play for the Central Ohio Theatre Organ Society and AGO.   Patty also presented an entertaining assembly during the school day at = Thomas Worthington High School for one hundred and fifty students. (Students need =   exposure to anything to know about it.) The Columbus Symphony Musicians = bring their "cause" to the schools through student concerts. Thomas Worthington High School has a unique situation with an organ in the school to host student concerts.   We, as organists should think about our opportunity and obligation to = foster a love of music in our young people. These young people have plenty of exposure to rock, rap, and "their" music. We could probably "stick a foot = in the door" with some theatre music and continue to open the door to all = music. We don't want all our churches to have digital organs with no human input, =   and four singers with microphones instead of a choir. If we don't care, = who will?   Patty graciously offered her remuneration to the Central Ohio Theatre = Organ Society to help with the restoration of that organ. We thank her for her generosity.   (signed) Ron Kenreich  
(back) Subject: Tapered Flue Timbres (was Re: Dulciana Cornet) From: <Sepp123@aol.com> Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2000 04:28:31 EST   Chris Baker writes:   > If the two Dolcan stops you mention do indeed have a 'touch of >Spitzflote' about them, then from the English perspective, this would >represent a considerable tonal incongruity. <snip> "... we could regard >the Spitzflote as a small horn-diapason, whilst the Dolce should never >exceed horn-flute. In both cases, the 'horn' element is slight, but in >the Spitzflote it leans to the very harmonic diapason sound, and in the >Dolce, leans to the suppressed-harmonics flute sound.   The Dulciana/Dolce/Dolcan Discussion has been very interesting, but now I'm curious about another stop. When Chris described English Spitzflutes as leaning towards a very harmonic diapason sound I couldn't think of any American examples I've played with that much harmonic development. The Spitzflutes I'm familiar with have more taper and therefore less harmonic development than a similarly scaled Gemshorn, which in turn sounds like a muted Diapason.   Just for the fun of it I looked up "Spitzfloete" in Appendix Two of "The Organ" by Williams and Owen. The last sentence reads as follows: "19th -century examples in Germany and England tend to be too string-like in tone."   What does that tell us, Jeeves? Has the British Spitzflute become a Spitzstring?   Joe McConathy Wodehouse fan in Colorado   P.S. I was at an organ dedication where the incumbent clergyman gave us the etymology of "Spitzfloete". He said it was so-named because of it's habit of spitting when it spoke. I could have forgiven him if he hadn't been a pipe voicer in a former life...   P.P.S. A Spitflute is what you get when somebody like me plays a recorder for 5 minutes.