PipeChat Digest #1245 - Sunday, January 30, 2000
 
Re: Re:Crescendo . . . two entertaining anecdotes
  by "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: Crescendo . . . two entertaining anecdotes
  by <Quilisma@socal.rr.com>
What are we going to do about it?
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Re: Crescendo . . . two entertaining anecdotes
  by "John Winn" <john@jwinn.demon.co.uk>
visibility
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Re: Crescendo . . . two entertaining anecdotes
  by "Karl E. Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersv.edu>
paging Laurie Spitz
  by "J S Vanderstad" <dcob@nac.net>
Wicks in SS. Peter & Paul, Hamburg NJ
  by "J S Vanderstad" <dcob@nac.net>
 



(back) Subject: Re: Re:Crescendo . . . two entertaining anecdotes From: "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2000 14:55:31 -0000   >2. Konzerthaus, Vienna: I'd not come across the German rollschweller = design >for a crescendo before being engaged to perform my first theatre & >transcriptions concert at that incredible 5/113 Rieger   Dear List,   I do know that rollschwellers exist, and that you spin them round and they add/subtract stops, but how do you use them and how do they work (I = remember earlier someone talking about pistons activating them),   Thanks,   Richard    
(back) Subject: Re: Crescendo . . . two entertaining anecdotes From: <Quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2000 11:07:41 -0800   It's a small rotating drum laid horizontally to the right (?) of the swell = shoe .... you roll it with your foot and it spins. It works just like a = crescendo pedal. I think somebody indicated that it usually takes about three = complete rotations to open it completely.   AS I RECALL (and memory dims with age ... it's been nearly forty years = since I played organs in Germany), you could also roll it to a certain point = (there are usually indicators of some sort to tell you how far you've rolled it) and = then CANCEL it by means of a piston, so that you can bring whatever you've set = on the rollschweller into the mix later on, just by hitting the "Rollschweller = ON" piston. Remember, German organs of that period had two, three, or four = "Frei" combinations MAX, so being able to set the rollschweller at different = points increased the number of preset combinations available to the organist. = And, since it could be cancelled, it could also be set, used, and cancelled   I have no documentation, but judging from analagous tubular pneumatic = crescendo mechanisms on turn-of-the-(last)-century Hooks, I imagine it could be = applied to pneumatic action organs, as well as electric. I also don't recall whether pneumatic action really ever caught on in Germany, or if they went = straight from tracker to electro-pneumatic.   Cheers,   Bud   Richard Pinel wrote:   > >2. Konzerthaus, Vienna: I'd not come across the German rollschweller = design > >for a crescendo before being engaged to perform my first theatre & > >transcriptions concert at that incredible 5/113 Rieger > > Dear List, > > I do know that rollschwellers exist, and that you spin them round and = they > add/subtract stops, but how do you use them and how do they work (I = remember > earlier someone talking about pistons activating them), > > Thanks, > > Richard > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: What are we going to do about it? From: <KriderSM@aol.com> Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2000 16:37:58 EST   How about a monthly or weekly "Open Console Night" during which two or = three keyboard players are invited to bring their music and play, under your = strict supervision of course, any music they have learned. Do clear this with the =   powers that be so that paritioners will not be startled to hear a Beatles melody or a piece from Boyz 2 Men.   I favor planting the seeds of interest in the youngsters in the = congregation.   Stan Krider     Erik Johnson asks:     >So having started some ideas what other ideas can our combined musical = minds   >come up with?    
(back) Subject: Re: Crescendo . . . two entertaining anecdotes From: "John Winn" <john@jwinn.demon.co.uk> Date: 29 Jan 2000 21:37:39 +0000   > It's a small rotating drum laid horizontally to the right (?) of the = swell shoe > ... you roll it with your foot and it spins. It works just like a = crescendo > pedal. I think somebody indicated that it usually takes about three = complete > rotations to open it completely. > > AS I RECALL (and memory dims with age ... it's been nearly forty years = since I > played organs in Germany), you could also roll it to a certain point = (there are > usually indicators of some sort to tell you how far you've rolled it) = and then > CANCEL it by means of a piston, so that you can bring whatever you've = set on the > rollschweller into the mix later on, just by hitting the "Rollschweller = ON" > piston. Remember, German organs of that period had two, three, or four = "Frei" > combinations MAX, so being able to set the rollschweller at different = points > increased the number of preset combinations available to the organist. = And, > since it could be cancelled, it could also be set, used, and cancelled > > I have no documentation, but judging from analagous tubular pneumatic = crescendo > mechanisms on turn-of-the-(last)-century Hooks, I imagine it could be = applied to > pneumatic action organs, as well as electric. I also don't recall = whether > pneumatic action really ever caught on in Germany, or if they went = straight from > tracker to electro-pneumatic. > The Rollschweller - an early form of expression pedal - is also known as a Waltze or roller. The "Waltz" being a dance where people perform a rolling motion.   The organ of St Michaelis, Luneburg, Germany has had pneumatic action for some years, certainly from its 1931 rebuild.   Regards,   John   -- John Winn Upminster, England    
(back) Subject: visibility From: <KriderSM@aol.com> Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2000 16:42:12 EST   I think you just did!   Stan Krider   Quilisma@socal.rr.com laments:   > ... I have people in the   >parish who have the equipment to videotape services, burn CDs, etc. ... = how do I   >politely say to them that we don't have the room, the organ, OR the choir = for   >that AT PRESENT?    
(back) Subject: Re: Crescendo . . . two entertaining anecdotes From: "Karl E. Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersv.edu> Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2000 21:16:55 -0500 (EST)   Re; the rollswelle:   An excellent example is on the big Steinmyer in the basilica in Altoona where Peter Sykes recorded all-Reger, ably restored by Columbia Organ Works. Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA   On 29 Jan 2000, John Winn wrote:   > > It's a small rotating drum laid horizontally to the right (?) of the = swell shoe > > ... you roll it with your foot and it spins. It works just like a = crescendo > > pedal. I think somebody indicated that it usually takes about three = complete > > rotations to open it completely. > > > > AS I RECALL (and memory dims with age ... it's been nearly forty years = since I > > played organs in Germany), you could also roll it to a certain point = (there are > > usually indicators of some sort to tell you how far you've rolled it) = and then > > CANCEL it by means of a piston, so that you can bring whatever you've = set on the > > rollschweller into the mix later on, just by hitting the = "Rollschweller ON" > > piston. Remember, German organs of that period had two, three, or four = "Frei" > > combinations MAX, so being able to set the rollschweller at different = points > > increased the number of preset combinations available to the organist. = And, > > since it could be cancelled, it could also be set, used, and cancelled > > > > I have no documentation, but judging from analagous tubular pneumatic = crescendo > > mechanisms on turn-of-the-(last)-century Hooks, I imagine it could be = applied to > > pneumatic action organs, as well as electric. I also don't recall = whether > > pneumatic action really ever caught on in Germany, or if they went = straight from > > tracker to electro-pneumatic. > > > The Rollschweller - an early form of expression pedal - is also known > as a Waltze or roller. The "Waltz" being a dance where people > perform a rolling motion. > > The organ of St Michaelis, Luneburg, Germany has had pneumatic action > for some years, certainly from its 1931 rebuild. > > Regards, > > John > > -- > John Winn > Upminster, England > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: paging Laurie Spitz From: "J S Vanderstad" <dcob@nac.net> Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2000 22:10:54 -0500   Dear Listers   Sorry to post this to the lists, but I figured someone out there could help me.   I have been trying in vain to contact a Laurie Spitz, formerly of NJ. She moved to Peoria, IL about 5 years ago and may have studied or is studying with Harold DuCou (I apologize if that is a typo.)   If anyone could forward to me her email address, or if this person happens to be on one of these lists drop me an email!   Thanks in advance to all,   Jan Vanderstad Oak Ridge, NJ  
(back) Subject: Wicks in SS. Peter & Paul, Hamburg NJ From: "J S Vanderstad" <dcob@nac.net> Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2000 22:19:12 -0500   Good Evening, Listers   I was wondering if any of you could provide more information reguarding the Wicks Opus 6381 (2000) at SS. Peter and Paul R. C. Church in Hamburg, NJ. According to Allan Laufman's column in the AMerican Organist Magazine the large gallery organ is controlled by a 3m console; the 6 rank chancel organ has a 2 manual console.   Can anyone provide me a specification, and if possible, contact me in reguard to an appointment to play the organ? I am most curious because Hamburg is a 30 min. drive north of where I am.   Thanks to all in advance,   Jan Vanderstad Oak Ridge, NJ