PipeChat Digest #1487 - Sunday, July 2, 2000
 
Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =C6-S /   Cincinnati's 	vanished Hook/Austin
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: secular organs
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =C6-S /    Cincinnati's 	vanished  Hook/Austi
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =C6-S /     Cincinnati's vanished Hook/Austin
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
secular organs
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
"new" organ material
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =90-S /   Cincinnati's 	vanished  Hook/Austin
  by "antoni scott" <ascott@epix.net>
Re: Adding electric to pipe organ
  by "LAMAR BOULET" <lmar@hotmail.com>
Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =C6-S /   Cincinnati's 	vanish	ed  Hook/Austi
  by "Luther Melby" <lmelby@prtel.com>
Ocean Grove
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: secular organs
  by "Mack" <dm726@delphi.com>
Ocean Grove Info
  by <Oboe32@aol.com>
45th Choir Festival- Ocean Grove
  by <Oboe32@aol.com>
Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =C6-S /     Cincinnati's vanished Hook/Austin
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: secular organs
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =C6-S / Cincinnati's vanished Hook/Austin From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Sun, 02 Jul 2000 20:16:35 +0800   Well Bob, you seem to be giving the picture as you see it in the USA but = that isn't the end of the world, you know, and I don't think you seem to know = much about what's going on elsewhere. I have heard and played some exciting or= gan music which has been composed in recent years. Do you expect a JSB or a C= esar Franck to pop up every twenty years or so? Now be careful how you answer = that one as I remember that 40 years ago the organ fraternity were sneering at= the music of Franck AND the organs it was best played on.   Contemporary Australian composers have tried their hand at composing musi= c for organ and pretty successfully . I have a recording of a Lovelock work for= organ and orchestra; exciting stuff with plenty of percussion, and later record= ings of several composers who wrote music for the opening of the Sydney Opera = House organ, reportedly the largest tracker in the world. Neither recorded in a church you may note but on an organ in a public building.   I have tried some pretty good stuff from the UK too, and, yes, some from = the USA which I play frequently. Hebble, Hampton, Corl, Johnston and others s= eem to have turned out music that is accepted by the ordinary run of the mill listener, but don't they count? Maybe they won't take the world by storm = but JSBs are few and far between.   In this country the playing of Thomas Heywood, Robert Ampt and Amy Johans= en seem to be attracting audiences, and the same could be said of Thomas Tro= tter in the UK. Dame Gillian never lacks an audience, and there are many more.= All of the above have got away from the constant repetition of Bach and the b= aroque and seem to be doing it very successfully. AND, note this - these are NOT= only playing in churches. Yes we have many organs not in churches and many of = them are new organs by well known builders, including well known Canadian fir= ms so beloved of JHHL.   And, by the way, in a recent concert I played two pieces, a transcription= of piece Credo Kaiser and an arrangement of the Londonderry Air (used plenty= of tremulant for those). Pretty tunes! I had more people come up to me and s= ay how much they enjoyed those two pieces than for any other strictly organ work= s. Maybe if you give people what they like to hear rather than what we think= they should hear more people would attend organ recitals. After all if we go t= o a symphony concert it is not all Mahler and Beethoven. There is plenty of l= ight music played there. Why should an organ concert be any different?   Cheer up Bob, slacken your stays, sit back and enjoy the music. It's ther= e if you like to go looking for it. It's easy for us to sit back and mope abou= t the subject if we don't get our heads into gear and observe what is going on= in the outside world, not just in our own cosy little corner!   Bob E.   Bob Scarborough wrote:   > At 01:47 PM 7/2/2000 +0800, you wrote: > >How can you say that? You haven't seen what I have? Have you got a clo= sed > mind?<snip> > > Moi? NEVER! Jes' needlin', as I'm famous for in all hemispheres. > Seriously, however, there's precious little out there that would be > considered a huge public "draw". New ground needs to be plowed (plough= ed?) > for certain; the old warhorses (Widor's 5th, Bach's 565 "The Ubiquitous= ", > and even a lot of Dupr=E9) has had their odometers turn over more than = once, > and no longer make for very interesting recitals for what public does s= how > up. Fox in the '70s roasted Bach to a crisp, as Biggs valiantly fought > back with never-ending "period-correct" recitals and recordings. Bach'= s > sorta "done" for now in the public ear, much to the certain chagrin of = the > tracker-backers. > > So, what DOES the organist have to offer the public? Piles and piles o= f > tepid church junk? Interestingly, the nation's most popular and > well-attended recitals these days (Spreckles, Wanamaker, the Maine Aust= in) > consist of that old 19th century staple, transcriptions! The unit > orchestra is holding its own, albeit with a seemingly endless stream of= the > dreaded, stereotypical "show tune". But now, the orgo-cognescendi is g= oing > off into the tracker-backer/Kellno-Vilottiland abyss, what with hard vo= iced > teutonic tonality and torture-chamber, "stops-on-the-wall" consoles mak= ing > such orchestrally-based presentations impossible, if not downright sill= y. > > It IS a puzzlement, indeed. As I listen to that old recording of the 1= 949 > Boston organ, I find it exciting and diverse...some Cavaille-C=F6ll her= e, > some Willis there, Skinner poking around in the background, and it all > sounds in BALANCE. The same could be said for Riverside, to a degree, = as > well as the St. Paul's Chapel/Columbia University organ. I think we've > headed off at passenger train speed onto a dead-end siding since then, > somehow, and the lack of illustreous, captivating contemporary repertoi= re > doesn't help, either. > > DeserTBoB > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org   -- ----------------------------------------------------- Click here for Free Video!! http://www.gohip.com/freevideo/      
(back) Subject: Re: secular organs From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sun, 2 Jul 2000 08:39:53 -0500   At 8:23 PM -0500 7/1/2000, John L. Speller wrote: >Storandt, Peter wrote: > > > It's kind of a vicious circle ... not that many concert halls have > > functioning > > organs, > >But on the other hand don't forget there have been quite a number of big >new organs in symphony halls in recent years. There is, for example, >the Fisk at the Myerson Hall in Dallas, and we at Quimby's are currently >installing a relocated Casavant organ in the new Jacoby Symphony Hall in >Jacksonville, Florida, which will be completed in time for a concert >series heavily involving the organ commencing in the fall. Also, I >believe Mander's are building a new instrument for the symphony hall in >Miami. I would say Boston and Cincinnati might be a bit behind the >times ...   There is also a new Casavant in Orchestra Hall in Chicago that I understand is wonderful. The consultant for that organ was Jeff Weiler who is also the consultant for the Jacksonville Casavant.   I have seen the console for the Jacksonville organ which is on display in the lobby of the Jacoby Symphony Hall and have also seen the specs for this organ. It looks like it will be a wonderful instrument especially since Jeff is involved with it.   David    
(back) Subject: Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =C6-S / Cincinnati's vanished Hook/Austin From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sun, 2 Jul 2000 08:59:09 -0500   At 8:16 PM +0800 7/2/2000, Bob Elms wrote: >In this country the playing of Thomas Heywood, Robert Ampt and Amy = Johansen >seem to be attracting audiences, and the same could be said of Thomas = Trotter >in the UK. Dame Gillian never lacks an audience, and there are many more. = All >of the above have got away from the constant repetition of Bach and >the baroque >and seem to be doing it very successfully. AND, note this - these are NOT = only >playing in churches. Yes we have many organs not in churches and many of = them >are new organs by well known builders, including well known Canadian = firms so >beloved of JHHL.   Robert Ampt, in his recent book about the Sydney Town Hall Organ, talks about his thoughts on programming concerts for the general public. To me, this is a MUST READ for all of us. He makes a lot of sense in his programming ideas as a Town Hall Organist.   In order to get the organ back before the public, organists need to learn to play for the public and not for other organists. I am very tired of recitals with all sorts of obscure pieces and pieces played without any feelings or expression because to do it that way is "politically correct" in the eyes of other organists. Virgil might not have been "politically correct" in his playing but he could draw an audience and make them ENJOY what they were hearing. We NEED more like him today.   When I was in college many moons ago, we had a organ professor that derided Virgil, saying that he "prostituted" his art. But that professor couldn't play his way out of a paper bag. Concerts need to be FUN!!! Not "academic" as so many of them are.   All of this gets back to a thread that was started some months ago and got dropped. If our instrument is to survive we need to give the public what they enjoy. And if that means to take liberties with Bach so be it. And if it means that we program transcriptions, then let us do so. Too many of us are doing a very good job of killing our own love!!   David    
(back) Subject: Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =C6-S / Cincinnati's vanished Hook/Austin From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Sun, 02 Jul 2000 09:10:27 -0500   At 7/2/00 08:16 PM, Bob Elms wrote:   >Maybe if you give people what they like to hear rather than what we think = they >should hear more people would attend organ recitals. After all if we go = to a >symphony concert it is not all Mahler and Beethoven. There is plenty of = light >music played there. Why should an organ concert be any different? <snip> > It's easy for us to sit back and mope about the >subject if we don't get our heads into gear and observe what is going on = in >the outside world, not just in our own cosy little corner!   Yes, Bob -- you're absolutely correct!!   How refreshing to hear of your success. Keep it up (despite what any of your/our stodgy 'colleagues' might take to complaining about)!! If more organists will be brave enough to eschew the "academic excercises" and = play the music that the public can understand and enjoy, the closer we will all get to insuring our beloved instrument has a firm place in the future scheme of things.   As far as "modern music" goes..., well, I also tend to think that there's = a lot of ugly, atonal, (academic, again?) crap being churned out in recent decades -- but that is not to say that it is *all* that way by any means. Certainly there is also a lot of interesting, melodic, and perfectly enjoyable new music as well. Seems to me that the dreck amongst today's new music will die-off on its own, as history continues to proceed. = Again, the operative point is to play music that people in general can easily enjoy -- no matter what the "ivory-tower-inhabitants" are fussing about.   <now quoting DeserTBoB>: >> But now, the orgo-cognescendi is going >> off into the tracker-backer/Kellno-Vilottiland abyss, what with hard = voiced >> teutonic tonality and torture-chamber, "stops-on-the-wall" consoles = making >> such orchestrally-based presentations impossible, if not downright = silly.   Take comfort, DB -- not *all* of us are building that sort of organ... = ;-)     Cheers All!   Tim Bovard Little Rock AR    
(back) Subject: secular organs From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Sun, 25 Jun 2000 04:30:43 -0500   Thank you David and Tim! We all need to think about our art and bring it to the people. After all, no people, no recitals and no organs. I work for a firm in central IL. and we dot build the "scratch and sniff" organs that makes your hair stand on end when the mixtures are drawn. One does not have to play a tracker to be correct. We don't all live in the world of academia. Life goes on. Thanks again.      
(back) Subject: "new" organ material From: <KriderSM@aol.com> Date: Sun, 2 Jul 2000 10:41:22 EDT   Well, how about finding out what music the public likes, then adapting = those melodies to organ literature?   Remember, many classical composers based their masterpieces on simple folk =   tunes. We revere their results today, don't we?   I've said it before, take any Beatles tune and create an orchestral/organ transcription from it. Take a song by Bacharach, Anka, Mancini, Hank Williams, Sr., name any pops songwriter, and encourage collegiate music students to prepare orchestral compositions from their simple efforts. Transcribe in whatever classical musical style the student (or assignment = by the professor) deems.   If the mountain won't come to Mohammad, then Mohammad must go to the mountain. Adapt or die! This is the Law of Natural Selection as applied to =   our favorite instrument.   Stan Krider     In a message dated 07/02/2000 5:01:18 AM Eastern Daylight Time, Bob Scarborough writes: >> So, what DOES the organist have to offer the public? Piles and piles of tepid church junk? Interestingly, the nation's most popular and well-attended recitals these days (Spreckles, Wanamaker, the Maine = Austin) consist of that old 19th century staple, transcriptions! The unit orchestra is holding its own, albeit with a seemingly endless stream of = the dreaded, stereotypical "show tune". But now, the orgo-cognescendi is = going off into the tracker-backer/Kellno-Vilottiland abyss, what with hard = voiced teutonic tonality and torture-chamber, "stops-on-the-wall" consoles = making such orchestrally-based presentations impossible, if not downright = silly.<<  
(back) Subject: Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =90-S / Cincinnati's vanished Hook/Austin From: "antoni scott" <ascott@epix.net> Date: Sun, 02 Jul 2000 10:52:13 -0400   Well said, Dave:   Virgil Fox knew how to play to an audience, young and old. Just remember the outstanding successes of the Heavy Organ series ( of which I was fortunate to attend several of them). Young people who normally thought of the organ as an uninteresting instrument were thunderous in their applause.   His "classical" series, played to a more organ involved audience such as in Carnegie Hall or Riverside Church, met with similar success but in a different, more reserved way. For an organ professor to say that he "prostituted" his art just showed his ignorance of the genius of Virgil Fox. I have sat through many technically perfect but boring recitals, also. Not as much fun, I must say. I have also sat through many less technically perfect playing and enjoyed it far more than the other because the organist playing with "life" rather than just metronomic precision.     Antoni Scott  
(back) Subject: Re: Adding electric to pipe organ From: "LAMAR BOULET" <lmar@hotmail.com> Date: Sun, 02 Jul 2000 08:15:20 PDT   Where in the country are you? I do want to listen to this. I hope it is somewhere near Louisiana. lamar     ----Original Message Follows---- From: RonSeverin@aol.com Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Adding electric to pipe organ Date: Sun, 2 Jul 2000 00:10:35 EDT   Dear Mark:   I've told others about this. If you get a chance to hear an Ahlborn module =   or two, it will be all over, (The looking and researching etc.). My church bought two a Classic and a 201, with Four large speaker Cabs., two five channel 450 = watt amps. a Cathedral reverb. system, 54 ranks installed for $14,000.00. Every stop = is separately voiceable, pipe speech, wind, treble Vs Bass, chiff, reed = speech, and the samples are to die for as they match the existing pipes to a tee. = There is nothing electronic sounding or phony about the sound what so ever. These will save a lot of small organs, and you'll look like a genius for saving a lot =   of money.   Do I sell them, no! I wish I did, I'd be rich by now! I sell trackers if = you could believe such a thing. General Music has a web site on Piporg-L under the Ahlborn name. Check them out, look at the specs of all four modules. They are coming out with a Cavaille Coll and a Silbermann sample module soon.   I've had big name organists down to my church to play them. They couldn't believe what they heard, and they weren't just being polite, they liked them. When = I saw your request, I couldn't resist telling you about them. We actually built the modules into the console, they work with my existing Peterson Combination action, and now SSL has come out with a module that makes a single memory combination action like mine perform as if it had 256 memories, all saved = on a single floppy. Things are happening fast in the electronic field and = mostly all good.   Let me know how you come out on your project.   Ron Severin   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org     ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =C6-S / Cincinnati's vanish ed Hook/Austin From: "Luther Melby" <lmelby@prtel.com> Date: Sun, 2 Jul 2000 11:14:50 -0500   Thanks David, BOY, did you ever write what I was thinking of writing, only better than I could have written it!!! I don't think Virgil got as popular as he d= id because he could play as well as he did, but also for WHAT pieces he played. Some of the music I've heard on organ, even if done very well and showed what the organ and organist can do, just don't cut it. I play my Virgil recordings the most. I just wish he had done some Norwegian tunes, like "I himmelen, i himmelen", and "Den store hvite flok= " etc. :-) Luther in Minnesota   -----Original Message----- From: David Scribner <david@blackiris.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Sunday, July 02, 2000 7:43 AM Subject: Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =C6-S / Cincinnati's vanished Hook/A= ustin     >snip< >In order to get the organ back before the public, organists need to >learn to play for the public and not for other organists. I am very >tired of recitals with all sorts of obscure pieces and pieces played >without any feelings or expression because to do it that way is >"politically correct" in the eyes of other organists. Virgil might >not have been "politically correct" in his playing but he could draw >an audience and make them ENJOY what they were hearing. We NEED more >like him today. > >When I was in college many moons ago, we had a organ professor that >derided Virgil, saying that he "prostituted" his art. But that >professor couldn't play his way out of a paper bag. Concerts need to >be FUN!!! Not "academic" as so many of them are. > >All of this gets back to a thread that was started some months ago >and got dropped. If our instrument is to survive we need to give the >public what they enjoy. And if that means to take liberties with >Bach so be it. And if it means that we program transcriptions, then >let us do so. Too many of us are doing a very good job of killing >our own love!! > >David > >    
(back) Subject: Ocean Grove From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Sun, 2 Jul 2000 12:32:46 -0400   Neil, what time is that Sunday Choir festival at Ocean Grove, and could someone please re-post the summer schedule? I meant to copy it down, and erased the message. Thanks, Judy Ollikkala  
(back) Subject: Re: secular organs From: "Mack" <dm726@delphi.com> Date: Sun, 02 Jul 2000 12:49:10 -0400   Well, as everybody knows, I can never keep quiet on a topic like this. I say a BIG AMEN!! To Tim & David. I have the distinct pleasure of personally knowing Virgil Fox and E. Power Biggs and heard them numerous times and with EPB always on an EP organ!!. His playing at Methuen was always stunning. Virgil did put on a better show but was no less of a musician and perhaps was even more talented, I will not get into that issue. Biggs played to the scholars in us not just for organists.   Fox played for fun and because he was good and had a huge following too. = I didn't like his Toaster concerts but he played the Symphony Hall organ in one of the best recitals I have ever heard including the Joungen. Wish they had taped it for posterity.   Summing up, we all need to "bend with the wind a little more" the dilettantes among us need to get a life and live in the real world before there are no more public concerts.   Cheers, Dave McPeak <Mack>     Gary Black wrote:   > Thank you David and Tim! We all need to think about our art and bring > it to the people. After all, no people, no recitals and no organs. I > work for a firm in central IL. and we dot build the "scratch and > sniff" organs that makes your hair stand on end when the mixtures are > drawn. One does not have to play a tracker to be correct. We don't > all live in the world of academia. Life goes on. Thanks again. > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Ocean Grove Info From: <Oboe32@aol.com> Date: Sun, 2 Jul 2000 12:48:56 EDT   Hey All,   As it currently stands, the Hope-Jones Organ in the Ocean Grove Auditorium is V/154. The additions this year include new secondary = Principals on the Great, new English Horn in the Solo, new Chorus Trumpet in the = Swell, and a few ranks of strings. The 5th manual was also added during the off season to place the Fanfare, String, and Antiphonal Divisions on. The = organ still has much planned for it though, as always! The news on the = instrument and stop list change every day, so come down and see it.   Organ Recitals: Saturday @ Noon Wednesday @ 7:30pm There are many "Organ PLUS" recitals this year with Brass, Strings, Soloists, etc. It is best to look on the Ocean Grove Camp Meeting Web = Site. You can find it using Yahoo or Excite, I don't quite know the address. As far as choral stuff goes, the Auditorium Choir sings every Sunday morning @ 10:30 and evening @ 7:30pm, and all are invited to come sing, = but you must have dark slaks or blouse with a white shirt (w/ dark tie). Music = is distributed 30 mins to 15 mins before the service to choir member at the "Choir Entrance" to the auditorium.   -Pete Isherwood  
(back) Subject: 45th Choir Festival- Ocean Grove From: <Oboe32@aol.com> Date: Sun, 2 Jul 2000 12:53:23 EDT   Hey All, The 45th Annual Ocean Grove Choir Festival, encompasing over 1500 singers, brass, tympani, and organ, will be this coming Sunday, July 9th @ =   7:30pm. All choirs and singers are invited to attend, but must supply = their own music. The Festival Choir has a manditory rehearsal for all singers = from 2 to 5pm in the auditorium. Singers are then given free time till 7pm to = eat and change. If you have any questions, call the Ocean Grove Camp Meeting = Association @ (732) 775-0035. Ocean Grove is easily reached from the Garden State Parkway, Exit 100 "Ocean Grove and Asbury Park".   -pete Isherwood  
(back) Subject: Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =C6-S / Cincinnati's vanished Hook/Austin From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sun, 02 Jul 2000 10:29:38   At 08:16 PM 7/2/2000 +0800, you wrote: >Well Bob, you seem to be giving the picture as you see it in the USA but = that >isn't the end of the world, you know<snip>   Oh, indeed. My comments are directed basically to the scene stateside, rather than worldwide. Theater organ enthusiasts have to "tune in" via Real Audio to Perth's RTR-FM to get a program featuring music for the unit orchestra; very few such programs exist in the US. On the classical side, Minnesota Public Radio's "Pipedreams" program is broadcast via National Public Radio outlets, and is a big shot in the arm to promote the organ = and its literature.   >Do you expect a JSB or a Cesar >Franck to pop up every twenty years or so? Now be careful how you answer = that >one as I remember that 40 years ago the organ fraternity were sneering at = the >music of Franck AND the organs it was best played on.<snip>   Well, the cognescendi and the academic hacks certainly were...I wasn't, = and neither were many others. I do remember that period, when many teachers, even those of note, would have student skip over the entire French = Romantic school to concentrate solely on counterpoint. Counterproductive, I always thought!   >Contemporary Australian composers have tried their hand at composing = music for >organ and pretty successfully . I have a recording of a Lovelock work for organ >and orchestra; exciting stuff with plenty of percussion, and later = recordings >of several composers who wrote music for the opening of the Sydney Opera House >organ, reportedly the largest tracker in the world. Neither recorded in a >church you may note but on an organ in a public building.<snip>   Indeed, the Aussies have a fine amount of organ performance and = composition in their midst, to their credit. Aside from cultural ties to England, their society is in many ways like what it is here. Quite obviously the organ in various forms is a hit down under; why not here??   >Maybe if you give people what they like to hear rather than what we think they >should hear more people would attend organ recitals.<snip>   An excellent point, indeed! As I stated, recitals of transcriptions on large symphonic instruments of the early 20th century hold sway up here. The traditional "organist's holiday" recital draws flies, as a rule.   >After all if we go to a >symphony concert it is not all Mahler and Beethoven. There is plenty of = light >music played there. Why should an organ concert be any different?<snip>   Well put!   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: secular organs From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sun, 02 Jul 2000 10:47:13   At 08:39 AM 7/2/2000 -0500, you wrote: >There is also a new Casavant in Orchestra Hall in Chicago that I=20 >understand is wonderful. The consultant for that organ was Jeff=20 >Weiler who is also the consultant for the Jacksonville Casavant.<snip>   I haven't heard anything other than on the list about these organs, but it seems the name of Weiler is popping up quite a bit lately connected with really fine installations. I wonder if we could somehow smuggle him into LA to "fix" the Wizzley mess...perhaps whilst hogtieing Gehry in a cheap motel room somewhere.   I've never met a Casavant I didn't like, either hearing or playing. I remember visiting Expo '67 in Montr=E9al. Casavant had set up an organ in a= n outdoor pavillion, and gave ample demonstrations and hosted fine recitalists. It was quite inspiring to a young organist seeing this kind of public exposure given to the instrument. Anyone happen to know the final disposition of that organ? I also heard the much-touted Beckerath at l'Oratoire while there. I remember it was...loud.   DeserTBoB