PipeChat Digest #1488 - Monday, July 3, 2000
 
Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =C6-S /      Cincinnati's vanished  Hook/Aust
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Score to National Emblem needed
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Making Historical Giants (Ocean grove)
  by <Oboe32@aol.com>
Gainesville AGO:  Members Recital
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =C6-S /   Cincinnati's vanished Hook/Austin
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =C6-S /  Cincinnati's 	vanished Hook/Austin
  by "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net>
Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =C6-S /    Cincinnati's vanished Hook/Austin
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =C6-S /    Cincinnati's vanished Hook/Austin
  by <Mark85inCT@aol.com>
Fw: Score to National Emblem needed
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Making Historical Giants (Ocean grove)
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Fw: Score to National Emblem needed
  by "Evelyn Rowe" <efrowe@mindspring.com>
Re: Ocean Grove
  by <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
ocean grove website
  by <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: Fw: Score to National Emblem needed
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Making Historical Giants (Ocean grove)
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =C6-S /  Cincinnati's 	vanished Hook/Austin
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =C6-S / Cincinnati's vanished Hook/Austin From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sun, 02 Jul 2000 11:11:43   At 08:59 AM 7/2/2000 -0500, you wrote: >Robert Ampt, in his recent book about the Sydney Town Hall Organ,=20 >talks about his thoughts on programming concerts for the general=20 >public. To me, this is a MUST READ for all of us. He makes a lot of=20 >sense in his programming ideas as a Town Hall Organist.   Hear hear! Ampt's book is indeed a prerequisite to anyone wishing to further the organ in the public eye, espeically in the US, where such talent is sorely needed.   >Virgil might=20 >not have been "politically correct" in his playing but he could draw=20 >an audience and make them ENJOY what they were hearing. We NEED more=20 >like him today.   True, true. Virgil was a showman first and foremost, one with an extraordinary technical skill. While I like to remain somewhat flexible on ideas of interpretation, I must admit that some of his Bach just didn't sound "right" to me, regardless of the protestations of the tenured hacks of academia.   >When I was in college many moons ago, we had a organ professor that=20 >derided Virgil, saying that he "prostituted" his art. But that=20 >professor couldn't play his way out of a paper bag. Concerts need to=20 >be FUN!!! Not "academic" as so many of them are.<snip>   Amen to THAT!! The age of the performing professor is sadly over. Most of these clowns teach organ at colleges because, 1.) they can't play to any sort of public acclaim, and 2.) know how to work the university system. I think they usually do more damage than good to many students, as they seem to relish turning out mere Xerox copies of themselves, rather than true performing artists.   >All of this gets back to a thread that was started some months ago=20 >and got dropped. If our instrument is to survive we need to give the=20 >public what they enjoy. And if that means to take liberties with=20 >Bach so be it.<schniip>   Wellllllll...OK...to a point. I draw the line at Bach dripping with c=E9lestes at 16', 8' and 4', however! Fox's overuse of that trademark in his Bach renditions would guarantee nausea for me.   >And if it means that we program transcriptions, then=20 >let us do so.<snip>   Ah, yes indeed, but...the organs with which these types of performances can be successfully rendered are disappearing, one by one, replaced by "Trackermania" and "stops-on-the-wall" contrivances. Such is my gripe about LA's "Wizzly" Titanic-in-waiting. The old Philharmonic Auditorium at Fifth and Olive in downtown LA was home to a large Austin of most definate orchestral nature. After completion of the Dorothy Chandler Pavillion in 1964, the Philharmonic was abandoned and leased long-term to a slowly dispersing Baptist congregation. I worked across the street from the old barn (interestingly the first large reinfornce concrete building in the world, built in 1901) and was able to play the old Austin on numerous weekday occassions. Certainly, Bach, Buxtehude and the other oldies was nigh impossible on the beast, but Romantic-era gems were well served by its orchestral specification and its power. Sadly, this organ was chopped up for fund raising souvenirs by the infamous Dave Junchen for the Foort-BBC M=F6ller installation in Pasadena. This was done rather quietly, and I only really learned for sure what had happened to it thorugh the offices of this list, years after the fact! While the pizza organ finally found a home, a large and significant Austin turned into nicknacks. I'll bet some of its pipes can be had on eBay...one at a time, of course.   The point of all this is, that we have two problems in the organ world in the US: Academic hacks touting teutonic "Trackermania" as the panecea of all things organic, and organists who recitalize to compete with and play to other organists. Those two critical points must be resolved for the instrument to survive into the next century in this country. As Mr. Elms so readily acknowledges in his post, and Mr. Ampt outlines well in his book, this can be done, with taste and success. Those that cannot recognize this are probably the ones that Virgil Fox said, "...just can't DO it!" Right he was....   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Score to National Emblem needed From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Sun, 2 Jul 2000 16:30:54 -0500   Hi. Learned a lesson today - played the prelude. Because no one ever = pays attention to the prelude, I had decided to throw in Virgil's version of = "The Star Spangled Banner" (too lazy to learn Ives or Buck) after the regular prelude - had stated so in the bulletin. I finished, and turned around - the whole congregation had quit talking and was STANDING! The head = acolyte and I just looked at each other and shrugged. I started to yell, "Play ball", but caught myself in time. We launched right into the processional hymn, "God of our fathers, whose almighty hand".   During announcements, I told them that because they were so good and patriotic during the prelude, it was perfectly OK for them to sit and = listen to the postlude, "The Stars and Stripes Forever", and not just run out the door.   Anyway, all that just to ask if anyone has a transcription of Bagley's "National Emblem".   Thanks for any help,   Glenda Sutton          
(back) Subject: Making Historical Giants (Ocean grove) From: <Oboe32@aol.com> Date: Sun, 2 Jul 2000 18:28:34 EDT   Hey All, Can you tell that today is my day off from the beach and = swimming!? A word to the wise, if you swim on the Jersey Shore, SWIM NEAR A LIFEGUARD! We've had TERRIBLE rip tides this year, I went in for 3 saves yesterday. = It is all due to this beach replenishment and enlarging the beaches...mother nature does not like it! So be safe when you swim and stay near a guard! ANYWAY...on to my subject...I am sure that there are many out there = who disagree with what has happened at Ocean Grove. The organ did begin as a humble 13 ranks, extended all over the place, and all on 25 inches on = wind. The problem was that the organ was not kept up over the years, actually = the early years in the late 50's and early 60's. So there was need to do work. =   The congregation also changed...it GREW! Ocean Grove did pack the = auditorium, but it didn't have organ recitals, or functions for the organ the way it = does now. There are two weekly recitals, dozens of weekly services, rehearsals, =   and concerts, all that use the organ, so yes, Gordon is VERY busy, as are those who take care of it! Due to the vast needs of the instrument, It was deemed necessary to augment what was there...they needed more sound and to reverse changes by early organ techs. So the original 13 ranks have all been restored and are = in their respective divisions, making up the solo organ "Reed", "String", and =   "Flue". There are 3 separate enclosures for the Solo, as well as having = the normal Swell, Choir, String, and Fanfare divisions all enclosed! The organ is HARDLY big on mixtures. The principals on the Great are LARGER than what Hope-Jones ever had scaled. The additions that have been done are tasteful, COLORFUL, and they make this organ not just a big = sound, but a very eclectic sound. This is the deffinition of a Color Machine! If = you can think or a reed, we have it! I don't think there is an Anthropologosa though! So rest asured my fine-feathered purist friends, I am very much = amongst your ranks and hold tight to my values of "organ history and = preservation"! Hope to see some of you at the festival or at the shore this Holiday = week!   -pete  
(back) Subject: Gainesville AGO: Members Recital From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sun, 2 Jul 2000 20:40:51 EDT   A PATRIOTIC CELEBRATION GAINESVILLE FL CHAPTER AGO 2 July 200 -- 4pm First Lutheran Church 1982 Kinzey-Angerstein tracker 2/34   The Star Spangled Banner Frances Conrad, organist 2 stanzas sung by all; historical introduction by Pastor Hinz   "Lord Jesus Christ, Be Present Now" . . . J S Bach "In Thee is Gladness" . . . J S Bach "My Country, 'Tis of Thee" (America) . . . Samuel Smith 3 stanzas sung by all; historical introduction by Pastor Hinz Sharon Yang, organist   "The Peace May Be Exchanged" (Rubrics) . . . Dan Locklair "Folktune" . . . Charles Callahan "God of Our Fathers" (National hymn) . . . Daniel C. Roberts 4 stanzas sung by all; historical introduction by Pastor Hinz "Strike Up the Band" . . . George Gershwin Bruce Cornely, organist   "The Battle of Trenton" . . . James Hewitt ** "March Joyeuse" . . . John H. Head James Kohler, organist; **Ken Babin, trumpet   "A Mighty Fortress Is Our God" . . . J S Bach Jonathan Swett, organist   March in B Flat . . . Charles Forsberg Lorraine Amick, pianist; Will Winter, french horn   "Battle Hymn" . . . Charles Ore Battle Hymn of the Republic 3 stanzas sung by all; historical introduction by Pastor HinzArt Swett, organist; Jody Crollick, piccolo; Jonathan Swett, trombone   "When Johnny Comes Marching Home" . . . Noel Goemanne Art Swett, organist; Dana Lucas, timpani; Jonathan Swett, share drum   ----   This was the second in our Summer Recital Series. Of note is the return = of Will Winter, a high school student, who first played french horn in our series last year and one on one other recital program during the year. = He is an excellent musician and a great asset to our programs. In addition = to the two guest musicians, from First Lutheran, it was a special treat to = have Jonathan Swett, son of Art Swett (First Lutheran Director of Music & Organist), play on the recital today. His playing was well above what = would be expected for a first year organ student. Attendance today was around 125! Our next program is 6 August, at First Baptist Church (3m Casavant), and = will be a program of Gospel hymns and period music. One of my favorite organs in town, the specification of First Lutheran's Kinzey-Angerstein is:   GREAT Pommer 16 Principal 8 Gedackt 8 Octave 4 Block Floete 4 Flach Floete 2 Nazard/Sesquialtera 2-2/3, 1-3/5 (double draw) Trompete 8   SWELL Gemshorn 8 Celeste 8 Rohr Floete 8 Flute 4 Principal 2 Quinte 1-1/3 Scharf IV Cromorne 8 Tremolo   PEDAL Subbass 16 Octave Bass 8 Choral Bass 4 Doublette/Mixture IV 2 (double draw) Fagott 16   Zimblstern (reversible piston with speed control) (new)   Swell to Great Great to Pedal Swell to Pedal   This is a wonderful organ, pearched up in the rear gallery. The keys are beautifully carved on the ends, and the tops are textured much like slate. = The action is comfortable and responsive; quite a nice instrument. It, however, did not benefit much from the addition of carpet in the side = aisles and under the pews. (sigh) It has also lost some of its charm recently after being set to equal temperament. It originally was Vogel V, which = was quite interesting, as I recal favoring F.   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com HOWLING ACRES: http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =C6-S / Cincinnati's vanished Hook/Austin From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sun, 2 Jul 2000 20:58:17 EDT   In a message dated 7/1/00 8:09:56 PM Eastern Daylight Time, = TRACKELECT@cs.com writes:   << Now wait a minute! There are actually people who understand and like 'modern music.' Because you are so close minded that you can't appreciate = anything composed after 1750 means that you are in a very small minority.>>   You apparently don't read my posts carefully or completely, and read none = of my recital programs. If you did you would realize how wrong your above statement is. I play very little music composed before 1750 in = comparison to the rest of my programs. You seem to forget, as well, that there is = more than one "period" of organ building style. I do support, encourage, and prefer to use instruments built in "period" style. That includes ALL periods; my enjoyment comes from hearing instruments with unique character =   and distinction. One of my least favorite sounds is a lovely romantic instrument with chiffing flutes. It just sounds stupid and does nothing = to enhance the music. Next on my list is reeds that are so compromised that =   they have little character of their own, and do justice to NO period of = music.   <<All of the music was composed after 1850. The recital started with a = piece by Reger. I'd like to see you pull in even 100 with a "period instrument' recital. >>   Well, just for the record.... I've NEVER EVER played a "period recital", although i've enjoyed them performed by others. They are not, however, my =   cup of tea!   <<Yes I love Bach and Buxtehude but not at the exclusion of all else. I = know of several people who have quit this very list calling it's members = "closed minded snobs".   I agree, and do not wish to have any period or style excluded. But those = of us who feel this way seem to be in the minority to those who are so "open minded" that they feel everything should be eqal temperament to the = exclusion of period examples. I also agreee that many on the list are "closed minded", but I would not elevate them to the level of snob!   And just for the record, I think that symphony halls SHOULD have period instruments, BUT they should be of the romantic period from most of their =   repertory is drawn. This is simply common sense. However (again), = having an instrument in a symphony hall with chiffing flutes and baroque reeds is =   simply nonsense; although I do think that there are temperaments other = than "equal" that would enhance and serve their purpose better. As a cellist, = I did not use equal temperament, even before I knew there were others (many years ago!)   << how many pre 1750 composers had mansions ? ) >> I don't recall, but it seems that some had to suffer it out in castles! <<"The twentieth century composer refuses to die." Edgar Varese>> True! It's just that much of their music smells like it already has!   Cheers! ;-)   PS: Please note what I played on the Gainesville AGO members recital = today!   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com HOWLING ACRES: http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =C6-S / Cincinnati's vanished Hook/Austin From: "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net> Date: Sun, 02 Jul 2000 08:00:51 -0500   On the contrary, I find that many more symphonic musicians become = interested in the organ as a real musical instrument when they find it can be directly controlled much like their own instruments. Many of them have grown up on = remote controlled instruments that tried to imitate and in some cases replace the orchestra. Beyond that we must get rid of the idea that mechanical action instruments = are therefore neo-baroque in sound. The Fisk Co. and others have now proven = again that a mechanical action organ can be as loud and full toned as you wish. = There is the story about the trombone player at Dallas who tied his white = handkerchief to his slide and waved the white flag after the first organ entrance to = prove that! Roy   TRACKELECT@cs.com wrote:   > In a message dated 7/1/00 7:33:38 PM Eastern Daylight Time, = Cremona502@cs.com > writes: > > << > << We on the organ side don't help matter much, what with pushing = arcane > temperaments and such! >> > Oh PUHLEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEZE! > >> > As someone who was a major in music school on an orchestral instrument = and is > now an organbuilder I have to line up behind Bob and say that they are = most > definately related. Furthermore, the whole "tracker backer/historic = organ" > movement has helped to make 'organ haters' out if people like Isaac = Stern and > Seji Osawa. > > Alan B > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =C6-S / Cincinnati's vanished Hook/Austin From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sun, 2 Jul 2000 21:52:00 EDT   In a message dated 7/2/00 1:46:31 AM Eastern Daylight Time, desertbob@rglobal.net writes:   << >I have been buying books of new >organ music for years, some of it very good and by English composers, = but a >lot of it by American composers. And it's not all church music.<snip> >>   There are some organist/composers who are writing some pleasurable music, although nothing or little on a concert scale, like Rheinberger or Elgar Sonatas, or symphonic music for organ and orchestra. The only modern = O/O pieces that comes to mind are the Copland piece which is probably the ONLY =   piece of his that i really like, and Poulenc. There are a couple of = others I've heard, but it's been a while and their names don't pop to mind. I think Dupre wrote some, but I'm not sure... although I'd be willing to gamble that I'd like his work.   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com HOWLING ACRES: http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =C6-S / Cincinnati's vanished Hook/Austin From: <Mark85inCT@aol.com> Date: Sun, 2 Jul 2000 22:34:52 EDT   English composer Arthur Wills (b. 1926), who was the Organist and = Choirmaster at Ely Cathedral for close to 4 decades, has also composed a very large concerto for organ strings and timpani (very reminiscent of Poulenc and dedicated to Fred Swann) in addition to a symphonic suite ("The Fenlands") =   written for organ and English brass band. Both pieces are very = challenging not only for the organist but for the other instrumentalists as well. If = I'm not mistaken, he's also composed a concerto for organ and acoustic guitar. = Come to think of it, Francis Jackson and Jean Langlais have also composed concerti for organ and orchestra.  
(back) Subject: Fw: Score to National Emblem needed From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sun, 2 Jul 2000 22:12:04 -0500   Good-going, Glenda. If it were me, I would have shouted, 'Play Ball!!' (then duck).   Rick     ----- Original Message ----- From: Glenda <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> To: PIPECHAT <pipechat@pipechat.org>; PIPORG-L <piporg-l@listserv.albany.edu> Sent: Sunday, July 02, 2000 4:30 PM Subject: Score to National Emblem needed     > Hi. Learned a lesson today - played the prelude. Because no one ever pays > attention to the prelude, I had decided to throw in Virgil's version of "The > Star Spangled Banner" (too lazy to learn Ives or Buck) after the regular > prelude - had stated so in the bulletin. I finished, and turned around = - > the whole congregation had quit talking and was STANDING! The head acolyte > and I just looked at each other and shrugged. I started to yell, "Play > ball", but caught myself in time. We launched right into the = processional > hymn, "God of our fathers, whose almighty hand". > > During announcements, I told them that because they were so good and > patriotic during the prelude, it was perfectly OK for them to sit and listen > to the postlude, "The Stars and Stripes Forever", and not just run out = the > door. > > Anyway, all that just to ask if anyone has a transcription of Bagley's > "National Emblem". > > Thanks for any help, > > Glenda Sutton > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Making Historical Giants (Ocean grove) From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sun, 2 Jul 2000 22:18:52 -0500   I understand Jones-ee put in a Tuba on 25-inches also. I think I have the origional stoplist in one of my books (The Recent Revolution In Organ Building) PLUS a pic of Mr Jones at the console.   Rick    
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: Score to National Emblem needed From: "Evelyn Rowe" <efrowe@mindspring.com> Date: Mon, 03 Jul 2000 00:11:31 -0400   At 10:12 PM 7/2/00 -0500, Rick wrote: >Good-going, Glenda. If it were me, I would have shouted, 'Play Ball!!' >(then duck).   At Calvary Episcopal in DC, where I supplied this morning, we closed with "Lift every voice and sing" AND the National Anthem. I take LEVAS at a fairly measured pace, partly because that's the style and partly because it's hard to read so many accidentals fast. I found that "O say, can you see" goes a lot better if played at a fairly lively clip, snapping the dotted rhythms in 18th-c. style. I bet the congregation was grateful, = too, after 3 interminable verses of LEVAS (if you're playing in a state of = sheer panic). We opened with "God of grace and God of glory" (Cwm Rhondda, of course), which I find less triumphalist than the official national days stuff, so I finished with the Paul Manz improv on the same, the one that uses material from the "Hallelujah Chorus."   Evie.  
(back) Subject: Re: Ocean Grove From: <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net> Date: Mon, 3 Jul 2000 00:06:54 -0400 (EDT)   Judy, the Choir Festival is at 7:30 p.m., at the Great Auditorium in Ocean Grove, NJ, exit 100 off the Garden State Parkway.   One should plan to arrive into town at least an hour early just to find a parking space AND a seat.   I always act as "chaperone" for the choir singers that go from my church. I sang one year, but found the intensity of sound too overwhelming for my ears (in the choir). Since then, I have been part of the audience, soaking up the "experience", and of course, soaking in perspiration (it's ALWAYS hot). There is just something about 6 or 7000 people in one place, singing and/or hearing choir music, because they WANT to.   Judy, I believe Ocean Grove has a website w/ summer info on it.   Cheers, Neil    
(back) Subject: ocean grove website From: <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net> Date: Mon, 3 Jul 2000 00:10:23 -0400 (EDT)   Judy, and friends, the website for Ocean Grove, NJ is at www.oceangrove.org.   Hope this helps. Neil    
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: Score to National Emblem needed From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Mon, 3 Jul 2000 00:42:10 EDT   In a message dated 7/3/00 12:06:42 AM Eastern Daylight Time, efrowe@mindspring.com writes:   << I take LEVAS at a fairly measured pace, partly because that's the style and partly because it's hard to read so many accidentals fast. >>   I was told that the "authentic" way to do LEVAS is close to a snails = pace.... but not as fast!!!! It is supposed to be done very, VERY slowly, with great flexibility and much retarding.   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com HOWLING ACRES: http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Making Historical Giants (Ocean grove) From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sun, 02 Jul 2000 21:36:36   At 10:18 PM 7/2/2000 -0500, you wrote: >I understand Jones-ee put in a Tuba on 25-inches also. I think I have the >origional stoplist in one of my books (The Recent Revolution In Organ >Building) PLUS a pic of Mr Jones at the console.<snip>   Now, THERE'S a sight to behold! I think he pioneered the "Don King" look, years ahead of its time...   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =C6-S / Cincinnati's vanished Hook/Austin From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Mon, 03 Jul 2000 14:55:42 +0800   There were many others. I heard a Guilmant Concerto for organ and = orchestra the other day - a massive work, and not his only work of this kind. Richard = Strauss wrote some, William Lovelock was another. The works are there if only = someone would play them..   As for organ music of scale, would you discount the works of Dupre, = Messiaen, Alain, Pedr, Howells, Vaughn Willliams, Thiman, Willan, Lloyd Webber, and = others of like ilk? I wouldn't! Matbe their works don't go on and on for 15-20 = minutes but that could be a plus as far as the public is concerned.   Bob Elms.   Cremona502@cs.com wrote:   > There are some organist/composers who are writing some pleasurable = music, > although nothing or little on a concert scale, like Rheinberger or Elgar > Sonatas, or symphonic music for organ and orchestra. The only modern = O/O > pieces that comes to mind are the Copland piece which is probably the = ONLY > piece of his that i really like, and Poulenc. > > Bruce > . . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles > Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com > HOWLING ACRES: http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502 > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org   -- ----------------------------------------------------- Click here for Free Video!! http://www.gohip.com/freevideo/