PipeChat Digest #1491 - Tuesday, July 4, 2000
 
To Track or Not To Track, Vol. CLVII, was Baaahstun
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Information needed
  by "Maynard Cuppy" <cuppy.maynard@mcleodusa.net>
Latin question (kinda off topic)
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
Re: Latin question (kinda off topic)
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Information needed
  by <CdyVanpool@aol.com>
Re: Latin question (kinda off topic)
  by <CareyOrgan@aol.com>
Re: Information needed
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =C6-S /  	Cincinnati'svanished Hook/Austin
  by "Mack" <dm726@delphi.com>
Re: Latin question (kinda off topic)
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
Seattle AGO
  by <DuysNicholson@aol.com>
Re: Latin question (kinda off topic)
  by <CareyOrgan@aol.com>
Re: Latin question (kinda off topic)
  by "Evelyn Rowe" <efrowe@mindspring.com>
Re: Latin question (kinda off topic)
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =C6-S /    Cincinnati'svanished Hook/Austin
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Latin question (kinda off topic)
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
Re: Latin question (kinda off topic)
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Latin question (kinda off topic)
  by "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org>
Re: Latin question (kinda off topic)
  by "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org>
 


(back) Subject: To Track or Not To Track, Vol. CLVII, was Baaahstun From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Tue, 04 Jul 2000 02:13:42   At 08:03 PM 7/3/2000 -0500, you wrote: >In my >opinion nothing better was ever created than the E. & G. G. Hook organs >of the 1860's. Of course, nineteenth-century organs do somewhat tend to >be trackers, so if you don't like trackers I imagine you would wish to >mess them up by electrocuting them.<snip>   The E. & G.G. Hook at Immaculate Conception in Baaaahstun was electrified in 1912 by Hook & Hastings, evidently to not much ill effect. Avoidance = of all matters "organic" in most all Catholic churches over the years happily left the organ fairly tonally intact, as it did the Little Flower Kilgen. For purposes of historical perservation, a tracker organ must be left intact, to be sure. But all this recent (starting in the late '50s) "TrackerMania", defined by myself as "tracker for tracker's sake", on new instruments, is to me at least, mere expensive faddishness and a status item on all but the smallest, most lightly winded "period" instruments.   I principally blame Biggs and writers such as Fesperman for starting this trend in the U.S., which seems to have reached full flower. However, the elimination of herds' worth of hides in windchests is a good thing, though better materials than are traditionally used in the slider chest could be employed to eliminate the usual leakage, noise and susceptibility to moisture. Proper lumber for such chests is in short supply and is prohibitively expensive. Still better is a thoughtfully designed electromagnetic action, which offers the ultimate in toeboard placement = and flexibility, and retains all the flexibility of ability to duplex that a pitman chest has, without the leather and arcane complication. The traditional "Wix Tix and Clix" doesn't have to be the norm, nor does poor, "thunking" speech. Cost savings from such an action also allows the builder to properly concentrate on what's really important...tonality.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Information needed From: "Maynard Cuppy" <cuppy.maynard@mcleodusa.net> Date: Tue, 04 Jul 2000 07:26:21 -0500   Cindy, You apparently forgot to try google.com. Here's what I found. Hope it = helps. Maynard     Congregational Song | Choral | VocalSolos | Children | = Instrumental | Handbell | Organ & Keyboard | Video                   Gilbert Martin   Gilbert M. Martin is currently a free lance composer = and an   editor of choral music. For more than 30 years, = organists, pianists, schools and churches have performed and = enjoyed his many and varied original compositions and = arrangements. He often travels throughout the country to teach and = conduct musical ensembles.   Martin was born in Southbridge, Massachusetts, in = 1941, and   now lives in Dayton, Ohio. He received a B. Mus. = from Westminster Choir College, Princeton, N.J., where he studied with Alexander McCurdy and George Lynn. He was = recently honored at Westminster as a distinguished composer = and graduate. He has received 21 yearly ASCAP Awards, = and is a member of ACDA, AGO, AEA, and NARAS.   Organ/Keyboard publications 160-652 "Sweet By and By"--An Organ Meditation         Your comments and suggestions are always welcome. Please = e-mail us your thoughts.   Home What's New | Music in Worship | About Selah | Composers & = Authors | Licensing Customer Service | Ordering   =A9 2000 Selah Publishing Co., Inc., Kingston, N.Y. 12401.       CdyVanpool@aol.com wrote:   > Dear List, > Well, I am gonna try it again: ( maybe I won't be jumped on = again ) > I have searched over the composer's lists here on the Net, and I can't = find > any kind of bio on Gilbert M. Martin. I know he went to Westminster = Choir > College and has had much music published by Lorenz... I think he has = moved on > from them... but that is all I can find out. If anyone has any = information or > knows a site I can get that information from, I would really appreciate = it. > Van Vanpool > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Latin question (kinda off topic) From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Tue, 04 Jul 2000 08:25:43 -0500   I have a Latin grammar question. We have started a new choral group at my church which sings exclusively "classical" music. The group is named "Cantate Dominum".   Here's the question - we are now working on a motet - and its title is "Cantate Domino". But there is also a piece in our library that is "Laudate Dominum".   I asked the group. Most of us only know Latin pronunciation and English meaning from dealing with Latin texts in music - but never took actual Latin language classes. I'm afraid I reduced the few who did to sitting muttering to themselves about ablative and objective cases - and when I asked them, but what does it mean, they just shrugged helplessly. The online Latin dictionaries are no help - they either have neither or both, and the translation is the same.   One of you is bound to know. "The list knows all." So, reply privately if you can help out. Cantate Dominum - Cantate Domino What's the difference? Which would be correct? We can change the name now before they sing in church and it appears officially in print. We don't want to be known as "that group with the bad Latin name".   anks-thay! Margo    
(back) Subject: Re: Latin question (kinda off topic) From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Tue, 4 Jul 2000 09:26:07 -0400 (EDT)     > Cantate Dominum - Cantate Domino >What's the difference? Which would be correct?   >Margo   Cantate Domino =3D Sing to the Lord (dative case: indirect object of the = verb) Laudate Dominum =3D Praise the Lord (accusative case: direct object of = the verb)   One cannot "sing the Lord," therefore Cantate Dominum is incorrect.   Randy Runyon organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati runyonr@muohio.edu author of DELIA WEBSTER AND THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD (University Press of Kentucky, 1996) Now available in paperback--check it out at Amazon.com!      
(back) Subject: Re: Information needed From: <CdyVanpool@aol.com> Date: Tue, 4 Jul 2000 10:24:58 EDT   A very nice person just send me the information I needed... Thank you... So nix the Information needed....... Van Vanpool  
(back) Subject: Re: Latin question (kinda off topic) From: <CareyOrgan@aol.com> Date: Tue, 4 Jul 2000 10:44:43 EDT   Hi Margo!   Cantate and Laudate are plural imperatives; exhorting a group to do something.   Cantate is exhorting a group to sing and Laudate exhorts the group to = praise. In my experience with both Latin and Choral Direction (my forte is = Gregorian Chant} I have never seen Cantate Dominum; but many times Cantate Domino. = I like manner, I have always seen Laudate Dominum. Perhaps the problem you = are having is (quia) because you and your group is taking the words out of context when you really need to examine the entire text.   Cantate Domino, Canticum novum. Cantate Domino omnis terra Sing (you) about or unto the Lord, Sing (you) a new song. Sing to the = Lord all you who are in (on) the earth   Laudate Dominum omnes gentes, Laudate eum omnes populi Give praise to the Lord all nations, Give praise to him all people     The word Laudate connotes not only"praise" but also the act of "giving" because the Latin word do,dare, dedi, datus is "to give." Therefore give praise.   In the example Cantate, the Canticum novum is Acc. case because it is = direct object. The dative "o" ending makes it the indirect object.   In the Laudate example the Accusative case in proper for direct object. I hope that you are not more confused than before! Paul Carey  
(back) Subject: Re: Information needed From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Tue, 4 Jul 2000 10:58:31 EDT   In a message dated 7/4/00 10:25:25 AM Eastern Daylight Time, CdyVanpool@aol.com writes:   << A very nice person just send me the information I needed... Thank = you... So nix the Information needed....... >> Thanks for sharing!   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com HOWLING ACRES: http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =C6-S / Cincinnati'svanished Hook/Austin From: "Mack" <dm726@delphi.com> Date: Tue, 04 Jul 2000 11:09:19 -0400   Well, here I go again!! I take exception with this statement as there were = several other companies, and in the Boston area too building wonderful instruments = and some surpassing the Hooks. Symphony Hall was a Hutchings before A-S did = it over and used quite a bit of the old stops I believe. Steere was also building significant instruments not to mention Johnson and I could continue but I = won't. A number of "tracker" instruments have benefited by electrocution, as you = call it, due to the fact that they were so ponderous to play they would have all = but disappeared if they hadn't been. Its what saved the Methuen organ, = although A-S. my employer at one time, gutted it and destroyed its historical = significance, although creating an interesting instrument in a spectacular case and = building. As has been mentioned the Hook in Immaculate Conception an excellent organ = and the Mission Church Hutchings I believe, although I don't know if it was = tracker first or not. My early remembering of hearing of the Symphony Hall Hutchings is = that it was a good organ that could shake the walls but alas I never heard it in = other than bad 78's.   Dave McPeak       "John L. Speller" wrote:   > In my > opinion nothing better was ever created than the E. & G. G. Hook organs > of the 1860's. Of course, nineteenth-century organs do somewhat tend to > be trackers, so if you don't like trackers I imagine you would wish to > mess them up by electrocuting them. Forgive me, therefore, for finding > your comments a little inconsistent. > > John Speller > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Latin question (kinda off topic) From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Tue, 04 Jul 2000 10:29:43 -0500   Many thanks! This is what happens when you come up with a name totally = off the top of your head. Cantate Dominum sounded familiar and "classy" - but then as = we later started looking at texts, we began to get suspicious that our grammar was = faulty. (Should'a stuck with English and German)   Henceforth - "Cantate Domino" it is! And they are, and quite beautifully, = if I do say so myself. :-)   Thanks again, Margo    
(back) Subject: Seattle AGO From: <DuysNicholson@aol.com> Date: Tue, 4 Jul 2000 11:24:56 EDT   Chats,   I thought I would forward this note from Michael Fox who I agree with = whole heartedly. What a great experience over the 4th. I don't need to repeat = the below message.......as an a-side. The panel discussion that included = Manuel Rosales, Fritz Noak, Paul Frits, Rene Marceau, and Mr Passi was an = agreeable and fun pannel without any sparing. Maybe there all mellowing and = excepting for what each other does. The issue of colaboration was discussed without = any fireworks and was stated as any percentage of colaboration is still a colaborative effort.   Peter Duys - in the mist of Seattle   Forward:"" Just a note about the weather: last week the Northwest suffered under an unusual heatwave, temperatures in Portland reaching the high 90s, Seattle = as usual a bit less. Thankfully, we're back down to the low 70s now, although = we could have done without the sprinkles and then rain we got today...   The convention opened last night with the first solo organ recital at Benaroya Hall on the 4/85 Fisk. Guy Bovet played the Bach Prelude & Fugue = in Eb BWV 552,then a previously unscheduled piece by Krebs which he thought would display the Positive 16' Dulcian (On discovering that he wasn't = happy with how the Dulcian sounded in it, he gave a little preliminary solo demo = of that stop, and then went on to Krebs.) The planned suite by Balbastre then followed, and both of the Fantaisies of Jehan Alain. After intermission, later music: the Franck Choral in a minor, Karg-Elert's op. 72 (Harmonies = du Soir, Clair de Lune, la Nuit), and then very recent stuff indeed, three of Bovet's own Tangos ecclesiasticos, completed soon enough before the convention that at the time he wrote program notes he was not sure which three of the twelve he would play.   Benaroya Hall is a big space though not a flattering one, and the Fisk is voiced typically big. (Some people I talked to found it disastrously dead. = I know dead, and this isn't it, but as the saying goes it is more visually = than acoustically spacious.) The organ definitely can be heard in the hall; it will play with the Seattle Symphony Thursday night, and I expect it to = hold its own. Like many in the hall, I didn't find it a particularly endearing sound, although some people I talked to liked individual voices, and it = was a rather odd program. The Bach was played with 16' plena, and may have been = the most satisfying part of the evening, although Krebs and Balbastre were effective. The first Alain Fantaisie was something of a horror from where = I sat, and more so for people sitting at higher levels who were nailed by typically maximum-voiced principals and mixtures. By contrast, the Franck = was mostly reeds and mostly non-French and mostly unconvincing. I looked = forward to hearing Karg-Elert more beforehand than I enjoyed having heard it afterwards. As far as demonstrating interesting sounds, Bovet's Tangos = were delightful, particularly the first,played in a version for pedal solo that sported the most unusual registration, from Tuba (box closed!) to = mutations with tremulant! If not quite as good as the Hamburger Totentanz, = definitely a product of the same interesting mind. It was only in the third Tango that = we heard full organ, and particularly the 32' Tuba Profunda. Those who know = tell me that it's not as big and effective as its counterpart in Dallas, but = the only one I know as huge and bold is the Skinner 32' Bombarde at Old South Church in Boston. The odd thing is that to my ears the organ absolutely required that reed to sound anything like balanced: all of the program previously had seemed topheavy and unanchored. And yet it is so big that = the effect is almost comical, and not just because it was playing a Tango.   My summary: an impressive organ, but outnumbered as I am, I still am not a Fisk believer.   If Sunday night was a case of unmet high expectations, Monday started = with surprise and delight. Some 25 years ago I lived in Seattle, and I remember the 1907 west end Hutchings-Votey of St. James Cathedral (RC) as a wheezy instrument in a dreary room. Well, it's not 1975 any more. The 4/51 organ = has received some attention, the building has been stripped of its carpeting = and acoustic tiles,and it now sings. Also, there is now a 3/48 Rosales in the chancel with a 4-manual console from which both instruments can be played. And played they were!   Nicolas Kynaston (at 9 AM, mind you!) played York Bowen's Fantasia, Karg-Elert's Stimmen der Nacht (op. 142), the Dupre Suite bretonne, and a transcription of the Bach d minor Chaconne for Violin by one Ulisse = Matthey. A great recital, although I heard it from the chancel and therefore heard = the Rosales sounding more aggressive than it would have back under the dome, where the Hutchings would have been better balanced. No matter.   The Bowen Fantasia I knew only from a recording (on Priory) by Marc = Rochester on the Collins organ of St. David's Hall, Cardiff, and it seemed an interesting enough piece that I got the score. And so discovered that it = is truly difficult, far beyond what I could tackle, and also a tricky piece = to make sense of. Kynaston used both instruments, and it both made perfect = sense and a glorious sound. A great opening piece. The Karg-Elert was played on = the Hutchings, which has a perfect assortment of appropriate kaleidoscopic registrations. The seldom played (and in the last two movements) = fiendishly difficult Dupre was played wonderfully on the Rosales, and the almost surrealistic transcription of the Bach Chaconne was a great conclusion. I always admired a sensational recording Kynaston made of the Liszt Ad nos = at Royal Albert Hall in the 70s, but I confess I did not realize just how = superb an organist he is. I look forward to hearing him again, playing anything = he might choose to.   One of the organists in that category is John Weaver, and he played this afternoon on the new 4/104 Reuter at University Presbyterian on which he recently recorded. He retained his position in the Pantheon by playing the Ernst/Bach Concerto in C Major, the Brahms 11 Chorale Preludes, and his = own Suite for Organ (plus an encore of his For All the Saints/When the Saints = Go Marching In). As usual, he performed from memory, and even though he got = lost for a measure or two in Herzlich tut mich verlangen and thus cannot be = said to have performed flawlessly, his playing is at such a musical standard = that I'd rather hear him invent a bit of Brahms than hear others play the = notes. The Brahms in particular was all I could ask: warmly but tastefully registered, lucidly phrased, chorale tunes brought out discreetly from accompaniment, all of these means used simply to let the music sing. His = own Suite, from its Prokofiev-like March through lush Aria to = take-no-prisoners finale, is brilliantly idiomatic for the American Classic organ.   And the Reuter is also a pleasant surprise. I've frequently thought of Reuters as having a tendency to shout, but this one has mild principals, sensible reeds, and is admirably suited to the rather dry acoustic. When = both Tuba and Trompette-en-Chamade are going, it's about all the room can take, but not more; and of course an organist of Weaver's taste used them both = only where the sheer exuberant over-the-top music makes restraint silly. Bravo, John Weaver!   Having to staff the Amadeus Press display during all exhibit hours meant = (and will mean) that I won't come close to being able to attend every recital, = but I'll report what I can from my own possibly peculiar perspective. Nothing tomorrow, when the convention most of the action moves to Tacoma, because = the exhibits remain open and I will remain anchored. Exhibitors will talk to = each other, but fortunately I have some music I can use to while away the idle hour or two on display instruments.   More anon, Michael Fox  
(back) Subject: Re: Latin question (kinda off topic) From: <CareyOrgan@aol.com> Date: Tue, 4 Jul 2000 11:27:43 EDT   Hi, again, Margo!   My mother was quite a baker and she would always say "If I must say so =   myself, that was a real good pie!" So, I was glad to help out and hope to =   hear your group sometime. Maybe a tape? Sincerely Paul    
(back) Subject: Re: Latin question (kinda off topic) From: "Evelyn Rowe" <efrowe@mindspring.com> Date: Tue, 04 Jul 2000 12:35:38 -0400   I note that the question has been answered already, sort of. Since, as we say at my day job, this is a recurring problem, let me amplify a bit:   "Cantate Domino" means "sing TO the Lord." The -o ending is in the dative case, also used with verbs like "dare" (to give), from whence comes the word "dative" itself. In English grammar, where we have few variant noun endings, we call it an indirect object."   "Laudate Dominum" means "praise the Lord." The -um ending is in the accusative case, corresponding to the English direct object.   Ergo, Cantate Domino would be the right name for your group. Any questions, class?   Evie, who a couple of careers back taught college beginning French for a year to kids who had never studied Latin or diagrammed a sentence   At 08:25 AM 7/4/00 -0500, Margo wrote: >I have a Latin grammar question. We have started a new choral group at >my church which sings exclusively "classical" music. The group is named >"Cantate Dominum". > >Here's the question - we are now working on a motet - and its title is >"Cantate Domino". But there is also a piece in our library that is >"Laudate Dominum". > >I asked the group. Most of us only know Latin pronunciation and English >meaning from dealing with Latin texts in music - but never took actual >Latin language classes. I'm afraid I reduced the few who did to sitting >muttering to themselves about ablative and objective cases - and when I >asked them, but what does it mean, they just shrugged helplessly. The >online Latin dictionaries are no help - they either have neither or >both, and the translation is the same. > >One of you is bound to know. "The list knows all." So, reply >privately if you can help out. > Cantate Dominum - Cantate Domino >What's the difference? Which would be correct? >We can change the name now before they sing in church and it appears >officially in print. We don't want to be known as "that group with the >bad Latin name". > >anks-thay! >Margo > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Latin question (kinda off topic) From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Tue, 04 Jul 2000 10:56:03   At 10:44 AM 7/4/2000 EDT, you wrote: >I have never seen Cantate Dominum; but many times Cantate Domino.<snip>   I was going to answer this one, as a four year Latin scholar, but it was done for me already, with great precision! "Cantate Dominum" is indeed = the dreaded "bad Latin name". However, as dead as Latin is, Cantate Domino is more likely to conjur up visions of canned cardboard pizza more than anything else.   The breadth of knowledge in here can always be counted on to carry the = day! Sorry, Margo!   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Baaahstun Symphony Hall =C6-S / Cincinnati'svanished Hook/Austin From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Tue, 04 Jul 2000 11:07:49   At 11:09 AM 7/4/2000 -0400, you wrote: >A number of "tracker" instruments have benefited by electrocution, as you call it, >due to the fact that they were so ponderous to play they would have all = but >disappeared if they hadn't been.<snip>   Thank you!   >Its what saved the Methuen organ, although A-S. >my employer at one time, gutted it and destroyed its historical significance, >although creating an interesting instrument in a spectacular case and building.<snip>   True enough. It's easy to quarterback while watching game playbacks, but in 1948, the historical movement hadn't yet caught hold. Although the original tonality of the original instrument was lost forever, I doubt anyone could say that Harrison's Methuen rebuild was a disaster. Kudos to all involed back then for retaining the imposing casework! It's quite an interesting instrument, and quite capable of performing literature from various schools, as is the Symphony Hall organ.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Latin question (kinda off topic) From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Tue, 04 Jul 2000 13:37:46 -0500   Yep - I personally like my Cantates spicy with Italian sausage and onions.   Actually, in Texas, I suspect it is more likely to remind folks of a = certain game played with little tiles with spots on them - very popular with the natives.... Then again, maybe that will draw an audience. They'll think = it's a dominos tournament!! ;-)   Bob Scarborough wrote:   > At 10:44 AM 7/4/2000 EDT, you wrote: > >I have never seen Cantate Dominum; but many times Cantate Domino.<snip> > > I was going to answer this one, as a four year Latin scholar, but it was > done for me already, with great precision! "Cantate Dominum" is indeed = the > dreaded "bad Latin name". However, as dead as Latin is, Cantate Domino = is > more likely to conjur up visions of canned cardboard pizza more than > anything else. > > The breadth of knowledge in here can always be counted on to carry the = day! > Sorry, Margo! > > DeserTBoB > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Latin question (kinda off topic) From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Tue, 04 Jul 2000 11:32:53   At 10:29 AM 7/4/2000 -0500, you wrote: >Henceforth - "Cantate Domino" it is!<snip>   Can I get extra toppings with that? <snarf snarf!>   dB  
(back) Subject: Re: Latin question (kinda off topic) From: "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org> Date: Tue, 4 Jul 2000 16:03:42 -0400   > However, as dead as Latin is, Cantate Domino is > more likely to conjur up visions of canned cardboard pizza more than > anything else.   Ooooouw!!! >-/    
(back) Subject: Re: Latin question (kinda off topic) From: "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org> Date: Tue, 4 Jul 2000 16:07:15 -0400   > However, as dead as Latin is, Cantate Domino is > more likely to conjur up visions of canned cardboard pizza more than > anything else.   Hate when I accidently hit the @$%! <send> key before I've finished! In addition to groaning at dBob's very true comment, a group that I = occasionally sing with has come up with a parody on the Taize version "Laudate Dominum" =   which changes it to "Let's go call Domino's!" I don't remember the rest = after that, but it generally degenerates into silliness about toppings.   Happy 4th to all!!! TommyLee