PipeChat Digest #1502 - Monday, July 10, 2000
 
Re: Caleb, Caleb, wherefore art thou?
  by "Chris Johns" <Chris_Johns@gmx.de>
Re: Caleb, Caleb, wherefore art thou?
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: jingle bells (it's crazy alan's christmas sale)
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: jingle bells (it's crazy alan's christmas sale)
  by "Paul R. Swank" <prswank@bellatlantic.net>
Pfeifenorgel sound font
  by <steve@open-tech.com>
Peter Hurford
  by "G. Jenista" <hiplain@flash.net>
Re: "Cort=E8ge et Litanie", Dupr=E9
  by "jnathan" <jnatpat@sunsix.infi.net>
the virtues of the Victorian anthem
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Caleb, Caleb, wherefore art thou?
  by "Evelyn Rowe" <efrowe@mindspring.com>
St. Paul's trash / St. Matthew's treasure (grin)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
We are open for business on PipeChat IRC tonight!
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca>
Re: St. Paul's trash / St. Matthew's treasure (grin)
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
just remembered another anthem
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
thank you! (x-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
All in the April Evening
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca>
Re: pre-Boer anthems
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: pre-Boer anthems
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: "new" organ material
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
Re: variable Soundfont tuning
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
O Thou, who changest not ... in whom there is no shadow of turning ...
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: In the news.... (OFF-TOPIC) (grin)
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
in modus antiquus
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: in modus antiquus
  by <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
Re: In the news.... (OFF-TOPIC) (grin)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: in modus antiquus
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Caleb, Caleb, wherefore art thou? From: "Chris Johns" <Chris_Johns@gmx.de> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 11:12:43 +0200   >Re: Caleb, Caleb, wherefore art thou?   A very good question, (bearing in mind that "wherefore" is equivalent in meaning to "why" and not "where"....). The only piece of his I've ever had the misfortune to come across was so unspeakably bad that I don't remember the name.   Reminds me of the Beecham quote: when asked what he thought of Stainer's Crucifixion, he paused and after reflection said, "a good idea".   Chris Johns   >Caleb Simper I have!!! >Bob E. > >quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote: > >> I would LOVE some Caleb Simper ... I think they must have kept him. = This was a >> discarded library from a "moderne" Episcopal church. >> >> Cheers, >> >> Bud >> >> Bob Elms wrote: >> >> > Wot! No Caleb Simper???? >> > Bob E. Frankenstrasse 5, D-49082 Osnabrueck Tel/Fax +49 (0)541 528 2568 EMail: @gmx.de    
(back) Subject: Re: Caleb, Caleb, wherefore art thou? From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 19:46:31 +0800   Chris. It's all equally bad, believe me! It follows a pattern. Loud introductory passage - 2 or 3 pages. Soprano solo, preferably by a wobbly soprano of uncertain age, a passage in 6/8 or fast 3/4, a slow movement = with plenty of pathos, and a jolly loud allegro ending with plenty of = hallelujahs!! They are all the same! Bob. E.   Chris Johns wrote:   > >Re: Caleb, Caleb, wherefore art thou? > > A very good question, (bearing in mind that "wherefore" is equivalent in > meaning to "why" and not "where"....). The only piece of his I've ever = had > the misfortune to come across was so unspeakably bad that I don't = remember > the name. > > Reminds me of the Beecham quote: when asked what he thought of Stainer's > Crucifixion, he paused and after reflection said, "a good idea". > > Chris Johns > > >Caleb Simper I have!!! > >Bob E. > > > >quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote: > > > >> I would LOVE some Caleb Simper ... I think they must have kept him. = This > was a > >> discarded library from a "moderne" Episcopal church. > >> > >> Cheers, > >> > >> Bud > >> > >> Bob Elms wrote: > >> > >> > Wot! No Caleb Simper???? > >> > Bob E. > Frankenstrasse 5, D-49082 Osnabrueck > Tel/Fax +49 (0)541 528 2568 > EMail: @gmx.de > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org   -- ----------------------------------------------------- Click here for Free Video!! http://www.gohip.com/freevideo/      
(back) Subject: Re: jingle bells (it's crazy alan's christmas sale) From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 09:18:22 -0500   >I bought a string of different small bells at Pier One imports that has >supplied several variable speed Zimbelsterns for a low price...   Another poster mentioned the use of an old Garrard turntable for the = motor.   I might suggest a motor kit from ALL Electronics www.allelectronics.com.   It is a stepper motor with a speed control circuit. It would drive the = the arm that strikes the bells.   you can select optimum speed, it's reversible, runs off 12volts, and it only costs $25.00. Cat. # SMKIT-2   We used one to run an ascending (or descending) set of little wind-chimes.   John V      
(back) Subject: Re: jingle bells (it's crazy alan's christmas sale) From: "Paul R. Swank" <prswank@bellatlantic.net> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 10:36:47 -0400   I have found that the Indian elephant bells seem to have a strange ring to them. I used some rather nicely made brass bells from a Christmas door decoration I found in a Christmas shop. The bells were graduated in size and tone, well made, and each had a two-part brass clapper, which I incorporated into the striking mechanism of the Zimbelstern. It took some looking to find the right bells, but I am very happy with these. Avoid = the cheaply made thin bells however, as the tone is much too thin and tinkly = as opposed to a crisp sonorous bell sound.   Paul.        
(back) Subject: Pfeifenorgel sound font From: <steve@open-tech.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 09:45:01 -0500   I've used the Jeux sound font, which is very good but has idiosyncracies (like the Bombarde 32'). Lately I've seen Pfeifenorgel mentioned. How does one acquire Pfeifenorgel?   Steve Chandler    
(back) Subject: Peter Hurford From: "G. Jenista" <hiplain@flash.net> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 10:03:27 -0500   What has happened to Peter Hurford? Haven't seen him mentioned at all, lately, and his photo no longer appears on one of the major artists' cooperative's advertisements.   George Jenista Fort Worth, Texas  
(back) Subject: Re: "Cort=E8ge et Litanie", Dupr=E9 From: "jnathan" <jnatpat@sunsix.infi.net> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 10:42:19 -0500   > Has anyone ever seen the score for such a pairing, or ever heard it > performed thusly? Interesting.... > > DeserTBoB >   Howdy... The year the Regional AGO convention was held in Nashville Tenn, about = 6-8 years ago, both versions of this piece was played in separate programs. = The orchestral/organ version was played by Mary Preston with the Nashville = Symphony at St. George's Episcopal Church, where Wilma Jensen resides. The other = time was a solo performance by David Higgs at First Baptist Church. It was really interesting to hear both interpretations in the same week! J Nathan Patton St. Peter's Episcopal Benton, Ky    
(back) Subject: the virtues of the Victorian anthem From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 08:52:02 -0700       Bob Elms wrote:   > Chris. It's all equally bad, believe me! It follows a pattern. Loud > introductory passage - 2 or 3 pages. Soprano solo, preferably by a = wobbly > soprano of uncertain age,   I know EXACTLY how old she is: 73! (grin) ... and she wobbles BEAUTIFULLY.   > a passage in 6/8   usually for the alto ...   > or fast 3/4, a slow movement with > plenty of pathos,   in the relative minor, of course (grin)   > and a jolly loud allegro ending with plenty of hallelujahs!!   Just so!   > > They are all the same! > Bob. E. >   And they're GUARANTEED to raise the collection by 10%-15% everytime we do = one (grin).   My CHOIR doesn't take 'em seriously ... they think they're GREAT fun ... = but the congregation thinks they're the pinnacle of Anglican taste and refinement, = so why fight a good thing? As long as we sing one Victorian anthem per service, = we can get away with singing buckets of Gregorian Chant as well (grin), and = whatever else I want to do. But the Offertory Anthem is unashamedly aimed at the = blue-hair / mink stole / country club crowd. If it inspires them, why not?   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Caleb, Caleb, wherefore art thou? From: "Evelyn Rowe" <efrowe@mindspring.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 11:59:49 -0400   At 07:46 PM 7/10/00 +0800, Bob E. wrote: >Chris. It's all equally bad, believe me! It follows a pattern. Loud >introductory passage - 2 or 3 pages. Soprano solo, preferably by a wobbly >soprano of uncertain age, a passage in 6/8 or fast 3/4, a slow movement = with >plenty of pathos, and a jolly loud allegro ending with plenty of = hallelujahs!! >They are all the same!   I don't think Caleb is represented in my file folder of out-of-copyright classics. I few years ago I rescued some stuff from the St. Paul's music library as it was going through its most recent clean-out. I also got copies of some old warhorses from the church where I played for over a year, including Roberts's "Seek ye the Lord" and Robison's (sp?) "All in = an April evening" (the latter being possibly the worst anthem, words and music, ever published and widely used -- it was still being sung at high school choral festivals in the early 1960's). Unfortunately, few of the other items are so bad they're good. The rest are just bad: harmonically and otherwise boring. I suppose there are venues like King's College = where anything sounds good, but these should definitely not be performed by an all-volunteer choir in a dead room.   Evelyn  
(back) Subject: St. Paul's trash / St. Matthew's treasure (grin) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 09:14:28 -0700   Evelyn - what titles have you?   Cheers,   Bud the Pack-rat   Evelyn Rowe wrote:   > At 07:46 PM 7/10/00 +0800, Bob E. wrote: > >Chris. It's all equally bad, believe me! It follows a pattern. Loud > >introductory passage - 2 or 3 pages. Soprano solo, preferably by a = wobbly > >soprano of uncertain age, a passage in 6/8 or fast 3/4, a slow movement = with > >plenty of pathos, and a jolly loud allegro ending with plenty of = hallelujahs!! > >They are all the same! > > I don't think Caleb is represented in my file folder of out-of-copyright > classics. I few years ago I rescued some stuff from the St. Paul's = music > library as it was going through its most recent clean-out. I also got > copies of some old warhorses from the church where I played for over a > year, including Roberts's "Seek ye the Lord" and Robison's (sp?) "All in = an > April evening" (the latter being possibly the worst anthem, words and > music, ever published and widely used -- it was still being sung at high > school choral festivals in the early 1960's). Unfortunately, few of the > other items are so bad they're good. The rest are just bad: = harmonically > and otherwise boring. I suppose there are venues like King's College = where > anything sounds good, but these should definitely not be performed by an > all-volunteer choir in a dead room. > > Evelyn > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: We are open for business on PipeChat IRC tonight! From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 12:43:34 -0400   Hi, PipeChatters,   PipeChat IRC is again going live this evening, as it always does on Monday and Friday evenings, at 9.00 PM EDT   For further information about how to get on board with PipeChat IRC, go to our Web page:   http://www.pipechat.org   Have fun, - come see what it is all about!   Bob Conway    
(back) Subject: Re: St. Paul's trash / St. Matthew's treasure (grin) From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 10:00:57   At 09:14 AM 7/10/2000 -0700, Evie wrote: > and Robison's (sp?) "All in an > April evening" (the latter being possibly the worst anthem, words and > music, ever published and widely used -- it was still being sung at high > school choral festivals in the early 1960's).<snip>   Ugh!! I remember that mess from high school concert choir!! <barf>   dB  
(back) Subject: just remembered another anthem From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 10:35:18 -0700   Does anybody have "Jesus, Our Lord, We Adore Thee" (double chorus) by Will James? Think Schirmer published it ...   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: thank you! (x-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 10:43:38 -0700   For those who might wonder what all the begging for anthems is about -- St. Matthew's is a new parish (about 15 years old); they had NO music to speak of (a Casio keyboard at most) for the first seven years; they had music of some description for about five years before I came (a grand piano, then the Mighty Hammond); I am the first professional organist/choirmaster they've employed. There was NO choir library when I arrived, except for a few Christmas things.   St. Matthew's is a traditionalist Anglican parish ... most of the things that would make up a traditional Anglican choir library are long out of print, and/or stuffed in boxes in church basements, particularly settings of the Communion Service and the Canticles to the old Prayer Book text.   I just want to say a BIG "thank-you" to EVERYONE who has helped me find all this stuff; if anybody else needs/wants it, I'll be happy to share .... I'll post another list at the end of the summer when I finish integrating it all into the filing system.   THANKS AGAIN!!!   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: All in the April Evening From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 14:01:51 -0400   The composer was Sir Hugh Roberton, the poet was Robbie Burns, - and you = lot don't like it!   HEATHENS, - that's what you are, HEATHENS!!   The piece was made famous by the Glasgow Orpheus Choir, which was founded = by Sir Hugh Roberton, and when he died the Choir decided that it no longer wanted to exist, so it died too.   There was an attempt to re-vitalize the choir under the new name of the Glasgow Phoenix Choir, but it wasn't the same, and I don't know if it is still in existence.   Fancy you lot not liking the piece, - but then, perhaps it needs a specialized mind to admire it in the way that so many Scotsmen and Englishmen do!   I am not ranting, just very surprised!   Bob Conway   ----- Original Message ----- From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@rglobal.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, July 10, 2000 10:00 AM Subject: Re: St. Paul's trash / St. Matthew's treasure (grin)     > At 09:14 AM 7/10/2000 -0700, Evie wrote: > > and Robison's (sp?) "All in an > > April evening" (the latter being possibly the worst anthem, words and > > music, ever published and widely used -- it was still being sung at = high > > school choral festivals in the early 1960's).<snip> > > Ugh!! I remember that mess from high school concert choir!! <barf> > > dB > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: pre-Boer anthems From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 14:21:41 EDT   Dear Bob:   I seems Bud is sick and tired of things modern. 1928/1662 prayer book = sounds like guitars are out, and organ and choir is in. There may be hope for mankind = yet. What to we do with Sebastian Temple, etc. and all those steel guitars, and =   praise garbage, you can't call most of it music for worship. A bonfire, a garage sale to churches wishing to be the first to actually make garbage work, perhaps = with the notion that it hasn't been tried by the right people yet!   I think Bud may actually be on the right track, tradition works everytime it's tried!   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: pre-Boer anthems From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 11:36:52   At 02:21 PM 7/10/2000 EDT, you wrote: >I think Bud may actually be on the right track, tradition works everytime =   >it's tried!<snip>   Not always...some of that old stuff was pure dreck in its own right! As for "traditionalism", my philosphy is this: That which is good will survive...that which isn't, won't. "Gee-tar masses" and other such mediocrities are already showing deep wrinkles of agedness, as will CCM in a short timeframe. However, a lot of the old anthems and such weren't all that great to begin with. Neither was a whole LOT of early 20th century Catholic stuff...what of it there was! Montani was a hack of the highest calibre, to be sure.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: "new" organ material From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 11:52:56 PDT     Actually check out Pierre Lewis' JavaTuner   http://www.quebectel.com/gt/usagers/roule/accord.htm   He is working on a beta version of a tool to allow you to play standard MIDI files in any tuning you want. It doesn't seem hard to combine this with the organ stop defaults.   The one thing I would be concerned about is the polyphonic restrictions on MIDI -- e.g. a 10-note chord on say 12 stops.   DG   ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: variable Soundfont tuning From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 11:54:48 PDT     >How does the organ world feel about this? How much more attractive >is = an >organ with different moods than one that's even tempered all >the time?   About 1000% better. :-)   DG   ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: O Thou, who changest not ... in whom there is no shadow of turning ... From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 12:03:00 -0700   It's interesting that the people who are coming into our church are YOUNG = people .... young married couples who have TRIED the mega-church route, and found = it lacking in depth / longevity. They AREN'T elderly dissident traditionalist Anglicans, but they embrace the tradition whole-heartedly.   Cheers,   Bud   RonSeverin@aol.com wrote:   > Dear Bob: > > I seems Bud is sick and tired of things modern. 1928/1662 prayer book = sounds > like > guitars are out, and organ and choir is in. There may be hope for = mankind yet. > What to we do with Sebastian Temple, etc. and all those steel guitars, = and > praise > garbage, you can't call most of it music for worship. A bonfire, a = garage > sale to > churches wishing to be the first to actually make garbage work, perhaps = with > the notion that it hasn't been tried by the right people yet! > > I think Bud may actually be on the right track, tradition works = everytime > it's tried! > > Ron Severin > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: In the news.... (OFF-TOPIC) (grin) From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 12:03:28 PDT     >(1) It would provoke a constitutional crisis in England ... the Sovereign =   >may >not (a) be a Roman Catholic or (b) marry one.   This is a really stupid rule. Just because the CEO runs the comnpany doesn't mean she has to buy its product. And who has the power to enforce =   this rule?   >The Anglican Communion is more likely to fly apart along conservative and >liberal lines, after the African bishops staged a VERY hostile = conservative >take-over of the last Lambeth Conference.   Amazing. Africa is beset by all kinds of problems stemming from the continent's domination by transnational corporations and yet these conservative fools play right into that. (Of course the African bishops = are probably on the take anyway.)   DG ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: in modus antiquus From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 12:19:17 -0700   I agree, BUT "pure dreck" sung with a pure tone and a straight face (grin) = in a good room with a good organ can move even "God's Frozen People" to = tears. There are things on King's College choir's lists that most American choirmasters won't touch with a ten-foot pole. Their loss ...   Yeah, Montani was a hack, but we still sing "Wondrous Love, That Cannot Falter" (grin).   Again, with ALL this stuff ... performance is EVERYTHING. We were so accustomed to hearing BAD choirs perform it BADLY that we never heard the music itself for all the wrong notes and scooping and sliding and wobbling sopranos, etc.   Case in point: I dragged out my "treasured" copy of the Griesbacher = Propers the other night and set the 12th Sunday after Pentecost in English. = Pulling the thing apart and re-typesetting it, I started to hear the romantic chromaticisms with late 19th century / early 20th century ears .. they = occur at points of tension in the text, and/or whenever the "heathen" do = something nasty. They sound like cliches to US, *now*, but they were probably quite exciting in their day, and they're still quite expressive of the texts.   And I *still* chuckle at the musicology grad students who mistook an "O Salutaris" of Father Rossini for BRUCKNER, if you please. It was one of = Old St. Mary's choir's favorite pieces. And we sang Perosi and Carnevale = masses in the summer-time, as well (grin), AND "Mass of the Shepherds" in Christmas-tide. They're FUN ...   Cheers,   Bud   Bob Scarborough wrote:   > At 02:21 PM 7/10/2000 EDT, you wrote: > >I think Bud may actually be on the right track, tradition works = everytime > >it's tried!<snip> > > Not always...some of that old stuff was pure dreck in its own right! As > for "traditionalism", my philosphy is this: That which is good will > survive...that which isn't, won't. "Gee-tar masses" and other such > mediocrities are already showing deep wrinkles of agedness, as will CCM = in > a short timeframe. However, a lot of the old anthems and such weren't = all > that great to begin with. Neither was a whole LOT of early 20th century > Catholic stuff...what of it there was! Montani was a hack of the = highest > calibre, to be sure. > > DeserTBoB > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: in modus antiquus From: <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 15:19:42 -0400 (EDT)   Good music sung beautifully is moving.   Good music sung terribly is tolerated.   Bad music sung terribly is endured.   Bad music sung beautifully has a chance.   Thus spake Neil the Sage :)    
(back) Subject: Re: In the news.... (OFF-TOPIC) (grin) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 12:39:41 -0700       "Dave G." wrote:   > >(1) It would provoke a constitutional crisis in England ... the = Sovereign > >may > >not (a) be a Roman Catholic or (b) marry one. > > This is a really stupid rule.   Not really ... the Sovereign can't simultaneously be the titular head of = the Church of England and a communicant of the Church of Rome ... for its = part, ROME wouldn't allow it. Being married to an RC, of course, brings up all sorts = of problems with the Succession; if the children were to be raised RC, none = of them could succeed to the throne.   The Brits haven't forgotten about Bloody Mary, or the Spanish Armada, or = the Gunpowder Plot, OR the Jesuit college at Douai ... the Jesuit Order is = STILL banned in England. The Act of Toleration for RCs didn't come until the = 1820s.   > Just because the CEO runs the comnpany > doesn't mean she has to buy its product. And who has the power to = enforce > this rule?   Parliament and the Archbishop of Canterbury, same as they did about = Margaret and Charles marrying divorced persons ... remember, President Reagan was the = FIRST divorced person to be presented at Court, and THAT only because he was a = head of state.   > >The Anglican Communion is more likely to fly apart along conservative = and > >liberal lines, after the African bishops staged a VERY hostile = conservative > >take-over of the last Lambeth Conference. > > Amazing. Africa is beset by all kinds of problems stemming from the > continent's domination by transnational corporations and yet these > conservative fools play right into that. (Of course the African bishops = are > probably on the take anyway.) > > DG   Agreed. In addition, what amazes ME is that those same bishops make accommodation with some of the most brutal, repressive regimes on the face = of the earth, and nobody (seemingly) calls them on THAT.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: in modus antiquus From: <DudelK@aol.com> Date: Mon Jul 10 15:42:17 2000   Again, with ALL this stuff ... performance is EVERYTHING. We were so accustomed to hearing BAD choirs perform it BADLY that we never heard the music itself for all the wrong notes and scooping and sliding and = wobbling sopranos, etc.   Hey, I had to accompany "In the Garden" yesterday as a solo! Instead of = going over the top, we took it very straight and simple and as near to = tasteful as this old hack could make it -- and, of course, the people = loved it. These same Presbyterians also sang Come Labor On as the closing = hymn like a bunch of Episcopalians. Go figure! Dudel