PipeChat Digest #1503 - Monday, July 10, 2000
 
RE: In the news.... (OFF-TOPIC) (grin)
  by "Barry H Bodie MD" <bbodie@InfoAve.Net>
Re: St. Paul's trash / St. Matthew's treasure (grin)
  by "Evelyn Rowe" <efrowe@mindspring.com>
Re: Soundfont tuning
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: All in the April Evening
  by "Evelyn Rowe" <efrowe@mindspring.com>
Re: solving the temperament argument
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: All in the April Evening
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca>
Re: In the news.... (OFF-TOPIC) (grin)
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: All in the April Evening
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
RE: O Thou, who changest not ... in whom there is no shadow of tu	rning .
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
RE: Peter Hurford
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
Re: All in the April Evening
  by "Maynard Cuppy" <cuppy.maynard@mcleodusa.net>
Dudley Buck's "Rock of Ages"
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
There's A Friend For Little Children
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Peter Hurford
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: There's A Friend For Little Children
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Re: There's A Friend For Little Children
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Re: St. Paul's trash / St. Matthew's treasure (grin)
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
 


(back) Subject: RE: In the news.... (OFF-TOPIC) (grin) From: "Barry H Bodie MD" <bbodie@InfoAve.Net> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 15:58:02 -0400   I thought the Farm Street Church was a Jesuit Church. Being of the = Anglican persuasion, I have no first-hand knowledge, of course.   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of quilisma@socal.rr.com Sent: Monday, July 10, 2000 3:40 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: In the news.... (OFF-TOPIC) (grin)         "Dave G." wrote:   > >(1) It would provoke a constitutional crisis in England ... the = Sovereign > >may > >not (a) be a Roman Catholic or (b) marry one. > > This is a really stupid rule.   Not really ... the Sovereign can't simultaneously be the titular head of = the Church of England and a communicant of the Church of Rome ... for its = part, ROME wouldn't allow it. Being married to an RC, of course, brings up all sorts = of problems with the Succession; if the children were to be raised RC, none = of them could succeed to the throne.   The Brits haven't forgotten about Bloody Mary, or the Spanish Armada, or = the Gunpowder Plot, OR the Jesuit college at Douai ... the Jesuit Order is = STILL banned in England. The Act of Toleration for RCs didn't come until the 1820s.   > Just because the CEO runs the comnpany > doesn't mean she has to buy its product. And who has the power to = enforce > this rule?   Parliament and the Archbishop of Canterbury, same as they did about = Margaret and Charles marrying divorced persons ... remember, President Reagan was the FIRST divorced person to be presented at Court, and THAT only because he was a head of state.   > >The Anglican Communion is more likely to fly apart along conservative = and > >liberal lines, after the African bishops staged a VERY hostile conservative > >take-over of the last Lambeth Conference. > > Amazing. Africa is beset by all kinds of problems stemming from the > continent's domination by transnational corporations and yet these > conservative fools play right into that. (Of course the African bishops are > probably on the take anyway.) > > DG   Agreed. In addition, what amazes ME is that those same bishops make accommodation with some of the most brutal, repressive regimes on the face of the earth, and nobody (seemingly) calls them on THAT.   Cheers,   Bud     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: St. Paul's trash / St. Matthew's treasure (grin) From: "Evelyn Rowe" <efrowe@mindspring.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 16:59:36 -0400   What's really scary is that I thought it wa pretty cool at the time.   Evie   At 10:00 AM 7/10/00 +0000, Bob wrote: >At 09:14 AM 7/10/2000 -0700, Evie wrote: >> and Robison's (sp?) "All in an >> April evening" (the latter being possibly the worst anthem, words and >> music, ever published and widely used -- it was still being sung at = high >> school choral festivals in the early 1960's).<snip> > >Ugh!! I remember that mess from high school concert choir!! <barf> > >dB > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Soundfont tuning From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 17:05:05 EDT   In a message dated 7/10/00 2:15:44 AM Eastern Daylight Time, elmsr@albanyis.com.au writes:   << You are missing the point Bruce. The fact is that equal temperament = will do a good job of playing ALL the repertoire including that of Bach and Co..   Sorry, Bob. But, that although equal temperament will do a good job of playing all repertoire is, indeed, a fact, it CANNOT do the best job, = which is what I prefer to enjoy. Some people may want to compromise and = settle, and if that is good enough for them, fine! I do not intend to live this way, especially with regard to music that I love so much. And it really =   irritates me that there are people who would force me to do this because = the majority of people wants it. << The music of Bach is played as much on the piano as the organ these = days and no one complains about the equal temperament of the pianos, and ,for = that matter, I have heard no complaints about Bach being played on organs tuned = to equal temperament.>>   DAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH! HAVE YOU NOT BEEN READING ANYTHING I'VE SAID. = I THINK I, AND A NUMBER OF OTHER PEOPLE H.A.V.E COMPLAINED ABOUT THIS VERY THING. It is truly sad that you choose to discount people who do not = agree with you as not mattering, or even being worthy of being counted. There =   are several notable pianists who have changed their thinking about temperament. I don't have their names but have read about them in = several websites.   << which, let's face it, is used in the vast majority of organs.>> ....and so, if we take a survey and discover that the vast majority of = organs have DE and are unified heavily, then should we change to this system as well. I didn't realize that the lowest common denominator should set the =   standard. <<No, I am not prepared to sacrifice playing modern composers on the = organ solely because pieces in a certain restricted number of keys sound great in a certain unusual temperament. Not for a moment. I would also disagree with your statement that no organ will play all organ music "authentically". What do you mean = by authentically? Authenticity indicates using stops/voicing and temperament, as well as action, common at the time the music was written; basically the sounds = that inspired the conception of the composition. This applies as well to the =   music of Franck, Reger, Rheinberger, and Sowerby. There is no one style = of organ that will performs all of these composer's works and do them = justice. This would especially apply to the music of Frank and Sowerby, two = musically similar composers who had vastly different tonal colours in mind as they wrote. I feel sorry for you that you don't feel a small sacrifice is = worth experiencing such beauty.   <<Are you saying that the music of Bach can only be played on an organ in Western Europe 300 years old? It sounds like it.>> Nope! I'm saying that the music of Bach is much more enjoyable to some people when authentically played on an instrument built in the style with which he was familiar. You're carrying the example to a gross extreme to prove a point; but you're missing it completely.   << That is the ultimate in authenticity.>> True! And it would be possible in only a very few remaining instances. = It could be approximated within the scope of current research with a reproduction instrument.   << OK, then you must play Haydn and his contemporaries on ancient = instruments too - no Steinway or Bechstein pianos allowed. They would not be = authentic. If you are going to argue along the lines you have adopted Bruce you must = go the whole hog and apply it universally to all music.What a boring = prospect!!! >>   Oh gee! I almost thought you got the point! Haydn's and Handel's organs =   were significantly different tonally from Bach's. Hearing the music = played in this way would be fascinating and offer more insight into the compositions. You said "no Steinway or Bechstein pianos allowed." Absolutely not, especially if we are playing organ music! But that does not mean that you couldn't play the music on a modern instrument; it would = offer yet another variation in approach to the music. Consider hearing a Bach =   Prelude and Fugue on a baroque reproduction instrument, then hearing a = Haydn or Handel concerto with organ on yet another reproduction instrument, and then going to hear the same pieces played on an 1860s Johnson & Sons, = then a 1900s Cavaille-Coll, then a 1930s Willis, then a 1950s AEolian-Skinner, = then a 1970s Austin, then a 1980s Beckerath, then a 1980s Fisk, then a 1990s Rosales, and then a 2000 Glatter-Goetz! How on earth can you possibly = see this as boring. If there is VARIETY the possibilities are endless. = If all temperaments are equal, and I suppose you want all pipework in America-Classis one-size-fits-all voicing, then there are few = possibilities! Now THAT'S boring!   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com HOWLING ACRES: http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: All in the April Evening From: "Evelyn Rowe" <efrowe@mindspring.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 17:17:15 -0400   At 02:01 PM 7/10/00 -0400, Bob Conway wrote: >The composer was Sir Hugh Roberton, the poet was Robbie Burns, - and you = lot >don't like it! > >HEATHENS, - that's what you are, HEATHENS!! > Actually, the copy I have, which has no copyright dates later than 1911, indicates that the text is by Katherine Tynan, whoever she was. I'm = amazed that you could ascribe this piece of doggerel (e.g. "Up on the blue, blue mountains, /Dewy pastures are sweet,/Rest for the little bodies,/Rest for the little feet") to the same man who wrote "To a mouse."   Evie  
(back) Subject: Re: solving the temperament argument From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 17:14:00 EDT   In a message dated 7/10/00 4:10:24 AM Eastern Daylight Time, ronniep@clear.net.nz writes:   << I am surprised that someone has not suggested Bruce, that you consider investing in a new or preused Rodgers PDI classical digital organ.>> You shouldn't be! Most people know better!! heeheehee   However, I have played a Rogers with multiple tuning systems. It was = sort of interesting but the "organish" sounds emitted from the speakers = prevented any actual enjoyment. I don't understand how people can actually make a reasonable comparison with this racket and real pipes.       Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com HOWLING ACRES: http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: All in the April Evening From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 17:34:48 -0400   OOHPS!!!   That's what comes of my not looking it up! Sir Hugh Roberton used so much of Robbie Burns stuff, that I simply thought that "All in the April = Evening" was one of them!   Mea culpa.   All the same, it's a lovely tune, and The Glasgow Orpheous Choir was the choir that he wrote it for! In their time they were the best in the land. When they came to London on their annual visit from Glasgow, every seat in the Royal Albert Hall was taken, (all 8,000 of them),- and Sir Hugh would have been lynched if they had not sung "All in the April Evening"   I hold my convictions regarding the piece, - I cannot possibly consider = that you do not like it! But it takes all sorts!   Bob ...   ----- Original Message ----- From: Evelyn Rowe <efrowe@mindspring.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, July 10, 2000 5:17 PM Subject: Re: All in the April Evening     > At 02:01 PM 7/10/00 -0400, Bob Conway wrote: > >The composer was Sir Hugh Roberton, the poet was Robbie Burns, - and = you lot > >don't like it! > > > >HEATHENS, - that's what you are, HEATHENS!! > > > Actually, the copy I have, which has no copyright dates later than 1911, > indicates that the text is by Katherine Tynan, whoever she was. I'm amazed > that you could ascribe this piece of doggerel (e.g. "Up on the blue, = blue > mountains, /Dewy pastures are sweet,/Rest for the little bodies,/Rest = for > the little feet") to the same man who wrote "To a mouse." > > Evie > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: In the news.... (OFF-TOPIC) (grin) From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 14:26:26   At 12:39 PM 7/10/2000 -0700, you wrote: >The Brits haven't forgotten about Bloody Mary, or the Spanish Armada, or = the >Gunpowder Plot, OR the Jesuit college at Douai ... the Jesuit Order is = STILL >banned in England. The Act of Toleration for RCs didn't come until the 1820s.<snip>   As well they shouldn't. Catholics who are blissfully ignorant of the church's evil doings are well to do some brushing up on history. There = are powerful reasons for Protestantism, not just based on theological grounds!   >Parliament and the Archbishop of Canterbury, same as they did about Margaret and >Charles marrying divorced persons ... remember, President Reagan was the FIRST >divorced person to be presented at Court, and THAT only because he was a head of >state.<snip>   How unfortunate for us.   By the way...has anyone ever found out how much money Hammond paid the Anglican Church to allow them to install an RT-3 in the Canterbury Cathedral back in the '60s? Those close to The Hammond Company insist = that (while Laurens Hammond was still there, anyway) that they NEVER gave anything away "for free". That wouldn't preclude them from PAYING the Church of England to install a living room organ in this ediface, however! Just what IS the organ history in that barn, anyway? How was it that a Hammond was allowed to take over in the first place? A silent Hill? Enquiring minds want to know! The Hammond installation was a source of great jocularity amonst organists everywhere when it happened.   >In addition, what amazes ME is that those same bishops make >accommodation with some of the most brutal, repressive regimes on the = face of >the earth, and nobody (seemingly) calls them on THAT.<snip>   Needless to say, Africa is a continent on the wane. Self rule there has been and continues to be a disaster. As for multinational corporations (a more "freshened up" version of colonialism), they hasten the demise of any society they come in contact with. Castro knew this all too well, as he watched US corporations plunder Cuba with the assistance of the corrupt Bautista regime. The African Anglican bishops are just part and parcel of a greater malaise.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: All in the April Evening From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 14:28:34   At 05:17 PM 7/10/2000 -0400, you wrote: >"Up on the blue, blue >mountains, /Dewy pastures are sweet,/Rest for the little bodies,/Rest for >the little feet")<snip>   GAAAAAACK! <barf vomit hurl>  
(back) Subject: RE: O Thou, who changest not ... in whom there is no shadow of tu rning ... From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 16:56:14 -0500   Same at our place.   Peter   -----Original Message----- From: quilisma@socal.rr.com [mailto:quilisma@socal.rr.com] Sent: Monday, July 10, 2000 2:03 PM To: PipeChat Subject: O Thou, who changest not ... in whom there is no shadow of turning ...     It's interesting that the people who are coming into our church are YOUNG people .... young married couples who have TRIED the mega-church route, and found = it lacking in depth / longevity. They AREN'T elderly dissident traditionalist Anglicans, but they embrace the tradition whole-heartedly.   Cheers,   Bud   RonSeverin@aol.com wrote:   > Dear Bob: > > I seems Bud is sick and tired of things modern. 1928/1662 prayer book sounds > like > guitars are out, and organ and choir is in. There may be hope for = mankind yet. > What to we do with Sebastian Temple, etc. and all those steel guitars, = and > praise > garbage, you can't call most of it music for worship. A bonfire, a = garage > sale to > churches wishing to be the first to actually make garbage work, perhaps with > the notion that it hasn't been tried by the right people yet! > > I think Bud may actually be on the right track, tradition works = everytime > it's tried! > > Ron Severin > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: RE: Peter Hurford From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 16:57:52 -0500   Last time I heard him netioned, he was dedicating a new organ in Spokane = in November 1999. According to one who attended it was a disappointing concert.   Peter   -----Original Message----- From: G. Jenista [mailto:hiplain@flash.net] Sent: Monday, July 10, 2000 10:03 AM To: PipeChat Subject: Peter Hurford     What has happened to Peter Hurford? Haven't seen him mentioned at all, lately, and his photo no longer appears on one of the major artists' cooperative's advertisements.   George Jenista Fort Worth, Texas   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: All in the April Evening From: "Maynard Cuppy" <cuppy.maynard@mcleodusa.net> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 17:11:22 -0500   This has nothing to do with the message below, but while we're on the = subject of oldies but moldies, has anyone seen a copy of Dudley Buck's "Rock of Ages" lately? Not there's a Victorian gem for you! I happen to like the piece = and it's certainly of better quality than the hymn we all know and love. Maynard   Bob Conway wrote:   > OOHPS!!! > > That's what comes of my not looking it up! Sir Hugh Roberton used so = much > of Robbie Burns stuff, that I simply thought that "All in the April = Evening" > was one of them! > > Mea culpa. > > All the same, it's a lovely tune, and The Glasgow Orpheous Choir was the > choir that he wrote it for! In their time they were the best in the = land. > When they came to London on their annual visit from Glasgow, every seat = in > the Royal Albert Hall was taken, (all 8,000 of them),- and Sir Hugh = would > have been lynched if they had not sung "All in the April Evening" > > I hold my convictions regarding the piece, - I cannot possibly consider = that > you do not like it! > But it takes all sorts! > > Bob ... > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: Evelyn Rowe <efrowe@mindspring.com> > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Monday, July 10, 2000 5:17 PM > Subject: Re: All in the April Evening > > > At 02:01 PM 7/10/00 -0400, Bob Conway wrote: > > >The composer was Sir Hugh Roberton, the poet was Robbie Burns, - and = you > lot > > >don't like it! > > > > > >HEATHENS, - that's what you are, HEATHENS!! > > > > > Actually, the copy I have, which has no copyright dates later than = 1911, > > indicates that the text is by Katherine Tynan, whoever she was. I'm > amazed > > that you could ascribe this piece of doggerel (e.g. "Up on the blue, = blue > > mountains, /Dewy pastures are sweet,/Rest for the little bodies,/Rest = for > > the little feet") to the same man who wrote "To a mouse." > > > > Evie > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Dudley Buck's "Rock of Ages" From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 16:06:24 -0700   I HAVE Dudley Buck's "Rock of Ages", if you want a copy (grin).   Cheers,   Bud   Maynard Cuppy wrote:   > This has nothing to do with the message below, but while we're on the = subject of > oldies but moldies, has anyone seen a copy of Dudley Buck's "Rock of = Ages" > lately? Not there's a Victorian gem for you! I happen to like the = piece and > it's certainly of better quality than the hymn we all know and love. > Maynard >    
(back) Subject: There's A Friend For Little Children From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 16:16:39 -0700   Aw, Bob, you old softy ... I suppose you don't like this one, either:   There's a Friend for little children Above the bright blue sky, A Friend who never changes, Whose love will never die; Our earthly friends may fail us, And change with changing years, This Friend is always worthy Of that dear name he bears.   There's a rest ...   There's a song ...   There's a home ...   There's a crown ...   There's a song ...   There's a robe ...     I was APPALLED to find this ISN'T in the 1940 Hymnal, but rather in the "Catechism" section of the august English Hymnal. I KNOW I learned it = growing up, and I didn't encounter an English Hymnal parish until I was in = college. Perhaps it was in the 1916 Hymnal or "The New Hymnal" ... we still used = those at St. Paul's in the late '50s.   Cheers,   Bud   Bob Scarborough wrote:   > At 05:17 PM 7/10/2000 -0400, you wrote: > >"Up on the blue, blue > >mountains, /Dewy pastures are sweet,/Rest for the little bodies,/Rest = for > >the little feet")<snip> > > GAAAAAACK! <barf vomit hurl> > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Peter Hurford From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 19:22:40 EDT   Dear Peter:   He probably played an unstable tracker with the stabilizers off just like = Guy Bovet.   Ron  
(back) Subject: Re: There's A Friend For Little Children From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 18:42:51 -0500   quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote:   > Aw, Bob, you old softy ... I suppose you don't like this one, either: > > There's a Friend for little children > > There's a rest ... > > There's a song ... > > There's a home ... > > There's a crown ... > > There's a song ... > > There's a robe ... > > I was APPALLED to find this ISN'T in the 1940 Hymnal, but rather in the > "Catechism" section of the august English Hymnal. I KNOW I learned it = growing > up, and I didn't encounter an English Hymnal parish until I was in = college. > Perhaps it was in the 1916 Hymnal or "The New Hymnal" ... we still used = those > at St. Paul's in the late '50s.   My copy of the 1916 is entitled "The New Hymnal", and the text is at = number 363. Choice of tunes is Stainer's "In Memoriam".   Only one "song", though, and no "robe".   ns    
(back) Subject: Re: There's A Friend For Little Children From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 18:51:18 -0500   I wrote, whilst suffering from an episode of fidgety fingers:   > > > Perhaps it was in the 1916 Hymnal or "The New Hymnal" ... we still = used those > > at St. Paul's in the late '50s. > > My copy of the 1916 is entitled "The New Hymnal", and the text is at = number 363. > Choice of tunes is Stainer's "In Memoriam". > > Only one "song", though, and no "robe".   There is not, of course, a choice of only one; the other tune was Samuel = Smith's "Edengrove."   > > > ns > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: St. Paul's trash / St. Matthew's treasure (grin) From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Tue, 11 Jul 2000 08:16:17 +0800   As a matter of fact the composer's name was Sir Hugh Roberton. Bob E.   Bob Scarborough wrote:   > At 09:14 AM 7/10/2000 -0700, Evie wrote: > > and Robison's (sp?) "All in an > > April evening" (the latter being possibly the worst anthem, words and > > music, ever published and widely used -- it was still being sung at = high > > school choral festivals in the early 1960's).<snip> > > Ugh!! I remember that mess from high school concert choir!! <barf> > > dB > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org   -- ----------------------------------------------------- Click here for Free Video!! http://www.gohip.com/freevideo/