PipeChat Digest #1513 - Thursday, July 13, 2000
 
Texhoma AGO Member's Recital
  by <CdyVanpool@aol.com>
Cleveland Skinners: Trinity and the Auditorium
  by "willh" <willh@cfl.rr.com>
Re: National Shrine of the Little Flower
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: National Shrine of the Little Flower
  by "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org>
RE: National Shrine of the Little Flower
  by "Charles E. Brown" <clmoney@cybernex.net>
some considerations
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Cleveland Skinners: Trinity and the Auditorium
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
SUB NEEDED TOMORROW- E. MA
  by "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net>
Hook and Hastings Centennial Organ in St. Joseph's Old Cathedral in Buffa
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca>
Re: Hook and Hastings Centennial Organ in St. Joseph's Old Cathedralin  B
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Her Bishness, weekly
  by "Ed Brown" <edbroorg@webtv.net>
Resultant
  by "Ed Brown" <edbroorg@webtv.net>
Endangered tracker available immediately
  by "Keith B Williams" <keithbwill@juno.com>
Re: Resultant
  by "Paul Soulek" <soulek@frontiernet.net>
Re: Resultant
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Resultant
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Resultant
  by "Paul Soulek" <soulek@frontiernet.net>
Re: Unda Marii, Ersatz Gemshorns and Ernie-Boy
  by <MickBerg@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: Texhoma AGO Member's Recital From: <CdyVanpool@aol.com> Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2000 09:50:10 EDT   I want to extend an invitation to any of you, in driving distance, to = attend our Texhoma AGO Member's Recital and ice cream social.   Sunday, July 16, 3:oo pm First Presbyterian Church 3061 Taft Blvd. ( across from Midwestern State University ) Wichita Falls, Texas   I am playing " Four Short Pieces" by Gilbert M. Martin 1. Fanfare and Trumpet Tune 2. Aria 3. Soliloquy for Flutes 4. Grand Dialogue Four other members are playing as well. I will be playing a 1961 Aeolian-Skinner-opus 1373 by Joseph S. Whiteford. 4/93 ranks 81 stops. A nice organ in a good acoustical = setting. If any of you can attend, please come up to me and introduce yourselves.   Van Vanpool, organist FUMC Bowie, Texas  
(back) Subject: Cleveland Skinners: Trinity and the Auditorium From: "willh" <willh@cfl.rr.com> Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2000 10:15:13 -0400     When the same thread about the Skinner at Trinity Cathedral in Cleveland came up about a year and a half ago I believe it was John = Speller who told me that there is really not much of the Skinner left in the chambers. Mainly its just the bass pipes and chests, if I remember right most of the other pipes are gone.     The Skinner in the Cleveland Auditorium doesn't see much use. = I think its mainly used for graduations in June and maybe other appearances occasionally. It was restored in the 70's and the original Skinner console was replaced by a Klann console. The original supposedly still exists somewhere and it would be nice to reconnected it to the organ especially since this is the only five manual organ Skinner ever built. Among the organs features are two 32' wooden Bombardes, a grand piano, a six rank string organ, and Tuba Mirabilis on 30" wind. The downside is that the organ suffers from poor chamber placement. The auditorium is built with a common stage that serves both the large Auditorium (c. 10,000 seats) and = the smaller little theatre. The designers wanted the organ to be heard in both auditoriums so Skinner was forced to install the organ in a side stage chamber. Because the organ lacked direct egress into the auditorium it = sound was quite muffled despite its 150 rank size. As a matter of fact, the Echo organ which was installed in the rear of the main auditorium was louder = than the main organ because it had a direct access to the auditorium.(the = echo's pipes are missing) In the 1930's the Cleveland AGO and Edwin Kraft tried = to raise the money to redesign the chambers so that the organ spoke into the auditorium. Unfortunately they didn't succeed and the organ remains in = it's original spot today. It was mainly heard on the radio in the 1930's and it sounded quite nice on the stage.     Will Scarboro          
(back) Subject: Re: National Shrine of the Little Flower From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2000 11:13:49 EDT   In a message dated 7/12/00 11:04:13 PM Eastern Daylight Time, = behnke@lvcm.com writes:   << I have never criticized your instrument or you for playing that instrument. Why must you turn around and bait someone else who doesn't happen to agree with your choices but is perfectly happy to let you play what you want. It is the same idiocity as the MAC vs. PC argument. This is not theology folks it is a choice of tool. The best organ or computer or for that matter temperament is the one that works best for you not for everybody. Lets grow up and get on with it. >>   I never said you did. But why these people (St. Mark's in Seattle = included) continually rip out or board up these romantic instruments and install trackers in their place, IN LITURGICAL CHURCHES where the choir has been = in the front chancel is beyond me. If one places a tracker in the rear = gallery WITH the original instrument still in place in the front (as St. Thomas = Fifth Avenue in New York has) then that's fine. But I can assure you that Gerre =   Hancock does not use the Taylor and Boody for the "service instrument."   Scott Foppiano  
(back) Subject: Re: National Shrine of the Little Flower From: "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org> Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2000 14:30:22 -0400   > I never said you did. But why these people (St. Mark's in > Seattle included) continually rip out or board up these > romantic instruments and install trackers in their place, IN > LITURGICAL CHURCHES where the choir has been in the front chancel > is beyond me. If one places a tracker in the rear gallery WITH > the original instrument still in place in the front (as St. Thomas > Fifth Avenue in New York has) then that's fine. But I can assure you > that Gerre Hancock does not use the Taylor and Boody for the > "service instrument."   I think that all of us are delighted that the Shrine of the Little Flower = was lucky enough to have people with the forsight to preserve their Kilgen.   The desire to preserve organs of the past seems to me to be a _very_ = recent phenomenon. In the past centuries, organs were modified according to the prevailing fad of the day with little or no regard to maintaining the integrity of the works of previous generations. Sometimes a few older = ranks were "reincorporated". However, just as many or more tracker organs were ripped out or electrocuted when the innovations of the electro-pneumatics = were all the rage at the begining of the 20th century. Some of the = electrocutions may have been a good thing because, as it has been pointed out, some of = the less well made or badly balanced trackers needed an organist with the = strength of Hercules to play them. (Whatcha bet some of those gents and ladies had =   death-grip handshakes!)   Before that, perfectly fine, well constructed little organs were = continually modified, expanded, replaced, hacked up, whatever because either the = original instrument had not been properly maintained and needed repair or the congregation simply wanted to keep up with the newer church up the block. =   That's why we have so few gems like the intact Thomas Appleton organ which = is currently being advertised by The Organ Clearing House.   Beautifully crafted consoles were chopped up and turned into btu's because =   they were out style and not yet old enough to be appreciated. Excellent 2 = and 3 manual w/ pedal board reed organs were sent to the dump and lost forever =   because they weren't as prestigious as pipes (or electric schpinetts).   The craze of the day in the last decade appears to be the all-mighty midi digital synthesizer Moloch. Rip out all those dusty, old, hard to = maintain pipes and digitize, digitize, digitize! (think Tom Leher here) It's so = cheap you don't need to worry about repairs, just chuck it when it fizzles and = get a newer, more improved set up. (Reckon anyone will ever be passionate about =   preserving those things?)   Folks, it will never end! That's why we need organizations like the OHS = and the ROS (Reed Organ Society) or else what precious few gems that we have = left from by-gone eras - with all their charm, bumps and warts - will never be =   heard again because they have been superceded by something newer, "better" = and "improved".   Stop pouncing on Bruce and others who like trackers. The sins of the past =   generation of tracker-backers were no better than the sins of the = generation before them but no worse either.   Cheers all! TommyLee ::who has now put on the asbestos overcoat::        
(back) Subject: RE: National Shrine of the Little Flower From: "Charles E. Brown" <clmoney@cybernex.net> Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2000 14:52:07 -0000   I have to agree with TommyLee here. I cannot help but to think of St. Patrick's Cathedral in NYC. They were considering getting rid of the = Kilgen there because it fell into such disrepair. When it was decided to restore and modernize the Kilgen, the results were beautiful. Frankly, they = couldn't replace the quality of that instrument today.   I was a little sad that they had to scrub the console, but it was = certainly understandable in many ways.   We are too fast to throw-away. And as TommyLee pointed out in his most insightful posting, this is not a new trend but one that has been very = much in vogue during most of the 20th century. Disrepair does not mean unrepairable.   I just saw one church that has a beautiful Kilgen in choir loft that they are really letting fall apart while they put a home electronic in the = front.   Very sad indeed. We need to guide churches back into rational decisions before they trash their present instruments.   Charles E. Brown http://www.classicalcorner.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of TommyLee Whitlock Sent: Thursday, July 13, 2000 6:30 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: National Shrine of the Little Flower     > I never said you did. But why these people (St. Mark's in > Seattle included) continually rip out or board up these > romantic instruments and install trackers in their place, IN > LITURGICAL CHURCHES where the choir has been in the front chancel > is beyond me. If one places a tracker in the rear gallery WITH > the original instrument still in place in the front (as St. Thomas > Fifth Avenue in New York has) then that's fine. But I can assure you > that Gerre Hancock does not use the Taylor and Boody for the > "service instrument."   I think that all of us are delighted that the Shrine of the Little Flower was lucky enough to have people with the forsight to preserve their Kilgen.   The desire to preserve organs of the past seems to me to be a _very_ = recent phenomenon. In the past centuries, organs were modified according to the prevailing fad of the day with little or no regard to maintaining the integrity of the works of previous generations. Sometimes a few older = ranks were "reincorporated". However, just as many or more tracker organs were ripped out or electrocuted when the innovations of the electro-pneumatics were all the rage at the begining of the 20th century. Some of the electrocutions may have been a good thing because, as it has been pointed out, some of = the less well made or badly balanced trackers needed an organist with the strength of Hercules to play them. (Whatcha bet some of those gents and ladies had death-grip handshakes!)   Before that, perfectly fine, well constructed little organs were = continually modified, expanded, replaced, hacked up, whatever because either the original instrument had not been properly maintained and needed repair or the congregation simply wanted to keep up with the newer church up the block. That's why we have so few gems like the intact Thomas Appleton organ which is currently being advertised by The Organ Clearing House.   Beautifully crafted consoles were chopped up and turned into btu's because they were out style and not yet old enough to be appreciated. Excellent 2 and 3 manual w/ pedal board reed organs were sent to the dump and lost forever because they weren't as prestigious as pipes (or electric schpinetts).   The craze of the day in the last decade appears to be the all-mighty midi digital synthesizer Moloch. Rip out all those dusty, old, hard to = maintain pipes and digitize, digitize, digitize! (think Tom Leher here) It's so cheap you don't need to worry about repairs, just chuck it when it fizzles and = get a newer, more improved set up. (Reckon anyone will ever be passionate about preserving those things?)   Folks, it will never end! That's why we need organizations like the OHS = and the ROS (Reed Organ Society) or else what precious few gems that we have left from by-gone eras - with all their charm, bumps and warts - will never be heard again because they have been superceded by something newer, "better" and "improved".   Stop pouncing on Bruce and others who like trackers. The sins of the past generation of tracker-backers were no better than the sins of the = generation before them but no worse either.   Cheers all! TommyLee ::who has now put on the asbestos overcoat::         "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: some considerations From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2000 12:00:45 -0700   99.44% of what TommyLee says is true, BUT, let's consider some of those "hatchet jobs": had Cavaille-Coll NOT (re)built on Cliquot's foundation, we wouldn't have the French romantic organ. Now, I don't think anyone considers C-C a hatchet-man for carrying the development of the (always-logical) French organ to the next (logical) stage of development.   I don't for one minute condone the supply-house electric pull-downs and supply-house consoles that were slapped onto venerable (and entirely serviceable) tracker organs ... still less that monstrosity of a *Wurlitzer* console that plays the Hook and Hastings in Holy Cross Cathedral in Boston, and similar situations.   But the Hooks themselves presided over the electrocution and enlarging of the Immaculate Conception organ in Boston, and nobody seems to think THAT instrument is much the worse for it, despite all the posturings about not using the Solo Organ or the super-couplers in recordings because they weren't part of the "original" instrument.   I submit that the Immaculate Conception organ is the instrument as it stands today; what went before is of historical interest, but the organ IS what it is TODAY, in the Year of Grace A.D. 2000. The original builder made the modifications. Why not leave it at that and accept them?   It probably COULD be returned to tracker action with a minimum of re-engineering, since the Hooks continued to lay out their actions AS IF they were trackers, even after they started building electric action. The vanished three-manual of 1900 in Old St. Paul's, Cincinnati had wooden trackers, stickers, squares, roller-boards, leather nuts, etc. right down to the point where the trackers would have dived under the floor from the (detached) console; at that point, the electrical contacts were inserted.   Apples and oranges ... I know. What's mostly being alluded to is the countless small trackers and reed organs that bit the dust in favor of cheap electric-action unit organs, or early Hammonds. THAT was a crime, and continues to be (subsitute "digitals" for "early Hammonds").   The American symphonic/romantic organ has an integrity of its own, as well. Fortunately, the wholesale destruction of these instruments is coming to a halt ... at least a handful survive intact. I was heartened to read of the restoration of the mighty Skinner at St. Luke's in Evanston ... it was in ruins when I played it in the '60s, but even then, one could sense what it had been, and could be again, with a sympathetic restoration.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: Cleveland Skinners: Trinity and the Auditorium From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2000 12:44:57   At 10:15 AM 7/13/2000 -0400, you wrote: > The Skinner in the Cleveland Auditorium doesn't see much use. = I >think its mainly used for graduations in June and maybe other appearances >occasionally. It was restored in the 70's and the original Skinner = console >was replaced by a Klann console.<snip>   Ewwwwwwwww!   >The designers wanted the organ to be heard in both >auditoriums so Skinner was forced to install the organ in a side stage >chamber. Because the organ lacked direct egress into the auditorium it = sound >was quite muffled despite its 150 rank size. As a matter of fact, the = Echo >organ which was installed in the rear of the main auditorium was louder = than >the main organ because it had a direct access to the auditorium.(the = echo's >pipes are missing)<snip>   Skinner wrote volumes of how chambers should be placed, etc., but it seems a lot of his organ wound up in really lousy places. The Palace of the Legion of Honor Skinner in San Francisco had its pipework hidden behind fake "rocks" made of cloth! Constant repainting over the years sealed the cloth up tight, making the organ "whimpy and muffled", according to guest artist Ron McKean. I understand that since he performed there, the cloth has been replaced, and the organ does speak better.   DeserTboB  
(back) Subject: SUB NEEDED TOMORROW- E. MA From: "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net> Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2000 16:16:45 -0400   Hello, lists- I got an anguished call from someone who needs an organ accompanist for a funeral tomorrow (Friday) morning.   It's at the convent of the Sisters of Divine Providence, 363 Bishop's Highway, Kingston, MA; the soloist is doing three numbers, and the sister who usually plays is recovering from breast cancer surgery and isn't up to it.   The soloist is Anna Marie Hessmann (212) 315-1309, at work; cell phone, = 646 221 7949.   The Convent is at (781) 585 7707- contact is Sr. Mary Lewis Lab.   I'll be checking my e-mail a couple of times tonight, but if anyone can play this or suggest someone to call, it might help to call either the soloist or the convent.   Thanks,   Paul   http://www.sover.net/~popel      
(back) Subject: Hook and Hastings Centennial Organ in St. Joseph's Old Cathedral in Buffalo, New York. From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2000 20:27:04 -0400   On reading Bud's very learned piece regarding Hook and Hastings organs, I remembered that among my collection of LPs, ( hardly ever played now!) there was one of the Hook and Hastings Centennial Organ in St. Joseph's = Old Cathedral in Buffalo New York.   This LP was originally produced by New World Records, Cat. No. NW 280 in 1976. I remember buying it at the downtown Towers in Lafayette Street, = New York City, among a whole bunch of other New World recordings that Towers were selling off in the Bargain Store.   I have never really liked this record, for one thing it seems to me that = the organ needed tuning, and that even though it may have been recognized as a fine organ in its day, it certainly sounds very "wooden" and even flat. Over the years I suppose that I might have played it three times prior to this evening, (and one of those times would have been when I did an All American Organ programme for CFRC-FM).   I have often wondered what is so remarkable about this organ, for the LP sleeve notes certainly praise it as an example of the best of American = Organ building. The organist is Richard Morris, and he certainly seems to be a very fine organist, but nothing on this LP seems to "come off" as well as = I would expect.   Has anyone on the List got this recording? If so, what do others think? = I played it again this evening before writing this, but I still cannot find anything to like about it, - the music is good, but the organ does not = seem up to it. I am wondering if it is a case of the wrong temperament for the music, - but to my way of thinking, the organist, or the record producer would surely have taken care of that.   I am puzzled about the sound of this instrument. I have never heard it = for real, - in fact, the only time I was ever in Buffalo was just before Christmas many years ago when we drove through Buffalo in a blinding snowstorm at about 3.00 AM on our way to Pittsburgh!   Has anyone got any thoughts on this organ?   Bob Conway    
(back) Subject: Re: Hook and Hastings Centennial Organ in St. Joseph's Old Cathedralin Buffalo, New York. From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2000 17:56:25 -0700   I played the organs at both the New Cathedral (big '20s Casavant Bros. = built at the short-lived American factory ... the organ was moved somewhere else = ... the church was torn down .. they couldn't afford to heat it, or some equally = silly excuse for pulling down a terribly expensive white marble cathedral) and = the Old Cathedral in Buffalo.   The sedes has reverted to the Old Cathedral (a charming old over-decorated Victorian Gothic pile), and I remember reading somewhere that the organ = had been restored.   When I played it ('50s? '60s?) the electric action (original?) was in an advanced state of decay, and the whole organ seemed seriously = under-winded.   I think we heard St. John's College Choir there for an AGO convention, and = the organ scholar played a couple of organ pieces ... it didn't sound like = much then, either.   I can't IMAGINE an H & H sounding that breathy and muffled ... as I = recall, everything but the Solo Tuba was in the free-standing case in the west = gallery .... I seem to remember the Tuba being in a chamber off to one side of the gallery ... perhaps someone who has heard it since the last rebuild can comment...   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Her Bishness, weekly From: "Ed Brown" <edbroorg@webtv.net> Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2000 21:27:59 -0400 (EDT)   She is sometimes seen on EWTN--the Catholic channel Ed    
(back) Subject: Resultant From: "Ed Brown" <edbroorg@webtv.net> Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2000 21:31:02 -0400 (EDT)   What is a Resultant and how does it work. I understand that two pipes play together at different tones to create the sound, but how---mechanically and otherwise Are you not hearing the original sound of the 2 pipes? Ed    
(back) Subject: Endangered tracker available immediately From: "Keith B Williams" <keithbwill@juno.com> Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2000 20:34:02 -0500   Buzard Pipe Organ Builders announces the immediate availability of a 7-stop, 2 manual and pedal 1972 Wicks tracker organ. Manual I - 8 , 4, (2' prepared), Manual II - 8, 4, 1-1/3, Pedal - 16'. Compass 56/32. The instrument is 106" inches tall x 122' wide x 48' deep (plus 6" for the keyboards and an additional 16" for the pedal board.) Pipework and blower have been removed and stored. All other components remain in situ in Central IL. I have a few digital photos of this organ with the pipework already removed. I played it before starting to dismantle it and it worked. Our strong preference is to find a buyer who will take the rest of the organ out within the next two weeks (by 7/28/00.) Tear-out must be done weekdays, during the daytime. The asking price under these conditions is $2,500. If we have to find storage space, arrange for a crew, and remove the rest of the instrument ourselves (if we can find the time before the deadline), this will add another c. $2,750 to the cost. Please contact me at <BuzardOrganSrvc@aol.com> if you can help me keep this organ from ending up on the discard pile.   Keith Williams Service Department Director Buzard Pipe Organ Builders 112 W Hill St Champaign IL 61820 217-352-1955 ________________________________________________________________ YOU'RE PAYING TOO MUCH FOR THE INTERNET! Juno now offers FREE Internet Access! Try it today - there's no risk! For your FREE software, visit: http://dl.www.juno.com/get/tagj.  
(back) Subject: Re: Resultant From: "Paul Soulek" <soulek@frontiernet.net> Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2000 20:36:41 -0500   I wonder this too- I play many medium sized organs (16-20 rank) with 32' Resultant stops and there is no sight of anything ever close to a 32' pipe.   Paul  
(back) Subject: Re: Resultant From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2000 18:45:52 -0700   A "resultant" combines two or more pitches to create a third pitch (usually lower) -- combine low C and low G on a 16' stop, and you (theoretically) create low C of a 32' stop, one octave lower.   The best resultants of that type are made with pipes that are INTENDED to "result" together, rather than borrowing the quint willy-nilly from wherever you can get it. Some 19th century builders joined the two pipes together with a common windway and toe ... this was called "monkey quints". Don't ask me why ... I just read the articles (grin).   To work properly, the pipe speaking the quint pitch should be slightly softer than the pipe speaking the fundamental pitch, but BOTH pipes should produce LOTS of fundamental, rather than more harmonics (like a Violone or a Principal), though Principal Resultants CAN work too.   Mechanically, resultants can be made on any kind of action ... on a tracker, the two ranks can draw separately or together, or be made as "monkey quints", above; on electric action, it's treated like any other stop.   Cheers,   Bud       Ed Brown wrote:   > What is a Resultant and how does it work. I understand that two pipes > play together at different tones to create the sound, but > how---mechanically and otherwise > Are you not hearing the original sound of the 2 pipes? > Ed > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Resultant From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2000 18:50:26 -0700   Paul - there wouldn't have to be, necessarily, in any case ... a = large-scale 16' stopped wood pipe can, of course, produce a real 32' tone without = having to resort to the "trick" of a resultant. In fact 32' Bourdons are a lot = more common than open 32' stops, often simply for reasons of space (not to mention cost) ... the last time I heard, the bottom 12 pipes of a 32' Bourdon cost in the neighborhood of $25K ... open 32' pipes (wood, metal = or reed) are CONSIDERABLY more.   Cheers,   Bud   Paul Soulek wrote:   > I wonder this too- I play many medium sized organs (16-20 rank) with 32' > Resultant stops and there is no sight of anything ever close to a 32' > pipe. > > Paul > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Resultant From: "Paul Soulek" <soulek@frontiernet.net> Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2000 21:01:42 -0500   quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote: > > Paul - there wouldn't have to be, necessarily, in any case ... a = large-scale > 16' stopped wood pipe can, of course, produce a real 32' tone without = having > to resort to the "trick" of a resultant. In fact 32' Bourdons are a lot = more > common than open 32' stops, often simply for reasons of space (not to > mention cost) ... the last time I heard, the bottom 12 pipes of a 32' > Bourdon cost in the neighborhood of $25K ... open 32' pipes (wood, metal = or > reed) are CONSIDERABLY more. > > Cheers, > > Bud   I just realized that after I hit send- we have many small chamber organs with 8' (actual length) stopped pipes and great bass.   Paul  
(back) Subject: Re: Unda Marii, Ersatz Gemshorns and Ernie-Boy From: <MickBerg@aol.com> Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2000 23:38:04 EDT   In a message dated 7/12/00 10:05:35 PM Pacific Daylight Time,=20 desertbob@rglobal.net writes:   << However, the double-mouthed Doppelfl=F6te doesn't get the nod, since both mouths speak from a common air column. >>   The Klann console that contains my PC Organ has a DoppelFlute drawknob on th= e=20 Great. How can I duplicate the sound of this stop? What does it sound like?=20 Would I need two "ranks" to accurately represent this stop? Useful and helpful suggestions only please, don't turn this into a=20 digital-bashing session. Thanks, Mick Berg.