PipeChat Digest #1515 - Friday, July 14, 2000
 
Re: National Shrine of the Little Flower
  by "Benjamin M. Baldus" <bbaldus@voyager.net>
Doppelflutes (was Re: Unda Marii, Ersatz Gemshorns and  Ernie-Boy)
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
St. Thomas Church and the Removed Nameplate
  by "willh" <willh@cfl.rr.com>
Concert Announcement
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: Concert Announcement
  by "Mark Harris" <M.Harris@Admin.lon.ac.uk>
Re: Doppelflutes (was Re: Unda Marii, Ersatz Gemshorns and  Ernie-Boy)
  by "Luther Melby" <lmelby@prtel.com>
Re: National Shrine of the Little Flower
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: St. Thomas Church and the Removed Nameplate
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: National Shrine of the Little Flower
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
RE: Unda Marii, Ersatz Gemshorns and Ernie-Boy
  by "Bert Atwood" <atwoody@ispchannel.com>
RE: Resultant
  by "Bert Atwood" <atwoody@ispchannel.com>
tuning quints
  by <support@opensystemsorgans.com>
Re: tuning quints
  by <KurtvonS@aol.com>
Re: Doppelflutes (was Re: Unda Marii, Ersatz Gemshorns and   Ernie-Boy)
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: National Shrine of the Little Flower
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
RE: Resultant
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: tuning quints
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: tuning quints
  by "Luther Melby" <lmelby@prtel.com>
Re: Resultant
  by "Paul Soulek" <soulek@frontiernet.net>
Re: tuning quints
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Riverside Concert
  by "Ed Brown" <edbroorg@webtv.net>
Hook and Hastings Centennial Organ in St. Joseph's Old Cathedral in Buffa
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
Re: Flentrops et al.
  by "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org>
Re: National Shrine of the Little Flower
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Doppelflutes (was Re: Unda Marii, Ersatz Gemshorns and   Ernie-Boy)
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: National Shrine of the Little Flower From: "Benjamin M. Baldus" <bbaldus@voyager.net> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 08:27:58 -0400   Actually Joseph Whiteford and the Board of Trustees of Aeolian-Skinner = asked that St Thomas Church (when William Self was O-C) remove both G. Donald = Harrison's signature plate and the Aeolian-Skinner plate. Saying that the instrument = no longer represented the designer's or the firm's tonal ideals. Now the = only indicator is a plate marked "Gilbert F. Adams, New York".   While the instrument no longer resembles the 1957 work of Harrison, it is certainly capable of sounds of great splendor and/or great subtlety. Bastardization is a word I wouldn't choose in this situation.   The Taylor & Boody gallery organ is an instrument of great beauty--both = tonally and visually.   Ben Baldus   Cremona502@cs.com wrote:   > In a message dated 7/13/00 11:14:37 AM Eastern Daylight Time, > ScottFop@aol.com writes: > > << If one places a tracker in the rear gallery > WITH the original instrument still in place in the front (as St. Thomas > Fifth > Avenue in New York has) then that's fine. >> > > You fail to realize the the wonderful AEolian-Skinner at St. Thomas = Church is > NO MORE. It has been bastardized beyond recognition. I believe this is = one > of the churches where EM Skinner reputedly went in and removed his = signature > plate! > > What is even more sad that this is the fact that some tastes are so = narrow > that only ONE style of instrument will suffice or satisfy. It is the = mark of > a true musician when said person has the ability to appreciate a broad > variety of styles. > > Bruce > . . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles > Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com > HOWLING ACRES: http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502 > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Doppelflutes (was Re: Unda Marii, Ersatz Gemshorns and Ernie-Boy) From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 07:52:38 -0500   At 7/13/00 11:38 PM, Mick Berg asked:   >The Klann console that contains my PC Organ has a DoppelFlute drawknob on = the >Great. How can I duplicate the sound of this stop? What does it sound = like?   Hello, Mick!   From a voicer's standpoint, a Doppelflute is simply equivalent to a very-wide-mouthed stopped flute rank (the very wide mouth is just divided into two halves on either side of the pipe). Depending on pressure/cutup/nicking/etc, this can result in a sound anywhere from "lovely liquid flute tone" to "hoot-flute from h***".   If one was to try to approximate the sound with a single-mouthed pipe, you would not need 2 pipes per note. One wide-mouthed wooden stopped flute (with a relatively low cut up for its mouth width) should be able to do = it. Think as if you were able to put the 2 doppel-mouths (with their typical normal cutups for their narrow width) side by side on one side of the same pipe -- this is the principle.   I too have heard some absolutely delicious examples of Doppelflutes (and, one or two not-so-stellar ones...). I wish the things weren't so overly labor-intensive to build -- perhaps then there would be more modern examples of them out there.   Ahhh......the joys of the romantic/symphonic organ...<g>!   Happy Friday to all!!   Tim Bovard Little Rock AR      
(back) Subject: St. Thomas Church and the Removed Nameplate From: "willh" <willh@cfl.rr.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 08:56:37 -0400     Actually the nameplate was of Harrison's signature. A-S wanted it removed because the organ was no longer anything like Harrison had left it. The letter to William Self about this is in the "Aeolian-Skinner Remembered" book.   Will Scarboro          
(back) Subject: Concert Announcement From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 09:40:26 -0400   Organ Pops and Ice Cream Social Thursday August 3 at 7:30pm St. Joseph Church, 35 Hamilton St. Worcester MA Richard Hill, concert organist Casavant 1928 Opus 1239 3M. Info: 508-754-7885 e-mail: 71431.2534@compuserve.com   Music for a Summer Night: J. F. Wagner "Under the Double Eagle March" von Flotow "Martha" Overture Joplin "Cleopha" Ketelbev "In a Persian Market" Friml "Indian Love Call" Ascher "Southern Fire Brigade" in Memory of the Worcester Firemen C. Williams "The Dream of Olwen" Luigini "Ballet Egyptian"   From Judy Ollikkala  
(back) Subject: Re: Concert Announcement From: "Mark Harris" <M.Harris@Admin.lon.ac.uk> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 14:51:19 GMT     > Organ Pops and Ice Cream Social --Coo! Must suggest this next time the Enfield & District Organists' Association plans to put on a Teachers' and Pupils' Concert!   >" Luigini "Ballet Egyptian" --Is an organ transcription available? What a great closing voluntary this would make :-)     Mark =3D=3D=3D=3D    
(back) Subject: Re: Doppelflutes (was Re: Unda Marii, Ersatz Gemshorns and Ernie-Boy) From: "Luther Melby" <lmelby@prtel.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 09:02:31 -0500   I have wondered, how is a Doppelflute voiced.? Would one mouth have to be closed up while the other is voiced? Or could a good voicer tell which mouth needs work? Thanks, Luther -----Original Message----- From: Tim Bovard <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Friday, July 14, 2000 6:28 AM     (snip) > I wish the things weren't so overly >labor-intensive to build -- perhaps then there would be more modern >examples of them out there. > >Ahhh......the joys of the romantic/symphonic organ...<g>! > >Happy Friday to all!! > >Tim Bovard >Little Rock AR > >    
(back) Subject: Re: National Shrine of the Little Flower From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 10:22:58 EDT   In a message dated 7/14/00 8:36:09 AM Eastern Daylight Time, bbaldus@voyager.net writes:   << While the instrument no longer resembles the 1957 work of Harrison, it = is certainly capable of sounds of great splendor and/or great subtlety. Bastardization is a word I wouldn't choose in this situation. >>   Destroyed?? Replaced?? Whatever it was, the original is now gone! = (and it wasn't done by tracker-ites!!!)   The following comment was made on another list. Thought it might be interesting for those who think only "one style" works in an Episcopal = church:   <<One of the parishes, St. Columba's in D.C., grew in part because of its excellent music program under the direction of Judith Brenemann (now = Dodge, I believe). They have a wonderful program involving all ages, as well as a beautiful Flentrop pipe organ (yep, a tracker with no pistons and a flat pedal board).   Great music involving a lot of people really does make the difference. >>   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com HOWLING ACRES: http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: St. Thomas Church and the Removed Nameplate From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 10:24:10 EDT   In a message dated 7/14/00 8:59:43 AM Eastern Daylight Time, = willh@cfl.rr.com writes:   << Actually the nameplate was of Harrison's signature. A-S = wanted it removed because the organ was no longer anything like Harrison had = left it. The letter to William Self about this is in the "Aeolian-Skinner Remembered" book. >> Oops! Sorry! It was very late!! ;-)   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com HOWLING ACRES: http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: National Shrine of the Little Flower From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 10:37:02 EDT   In a message dated 7/14/00 2:34:48 AM Eastern Daylight Time, Cremona502@cs.com writes:   << You fail to realize the the wonderful AEolian-Skinner at St. Thomas = Church is NO MORE. It has been bastardized beyond recognition. I believe this is = one of the churches where EM Skinner reputedly went in and removed his = signature plate!   Having played four recitals at St. Thomas, I am keenly aware of the instrument(s) and their histories. The chancel organ is neither an EM Skinner nor an Aeolian Skinner. Gil Adams and others since him have made = it rather a hybrid, and Gerre has done wonderful things with it, especially considering what he has had to work with.   What is even more sad that this is the fact that some tastes are so = narrow that only ONE style of instrument will suffice or satisfy. It is the = mark of a true musician when said person has the ability to appreciate a broad variety of styles. >>   I appreciate a broad variety of styles as do many of my friends and colleagues. But what I do not appreciate is when an organist come into a = new position and persuades the church to throw out the old (which is more = often that not an EP of a more romantic nature) and put in a tracker of more limited resources. That is what upsets me. Put in all the trackers you = want to, but don't throw out a perfectly good and functioning romantic = instrument JUST TO SATISFY A FAD or personal ego. If the older instrument needs releathering or some work, fine- do it and you still may be able to have = your tracker- then you can have BOTH, but don't get rid of the old instrument because the diapasons might be bright enough PRINZIPALS to suit your = personal tastes or the flutes don't chiff like xylophones, because once the old = organ is gone it will never come back and will eventually be missed. Just like = the San Francisco Fox, the Memphis Kimball etc. I also refer to First Pres Portland (again). I have heard nothing but negative remarks on that = organ, especially in light of what it replaced. I saw a picture of the front of that church at the AGO convention in Seattle and while it looks = impressive, its musicality (or lack thereof) still overshadows its appearance. And acoustics must be considered as well...   Scott Foppiano  
(back) Subject: RE: Unda Marii, Ersatz Gemshorns and Ernie-Boy From: "Bert Atwood" <atwoody@ispchannel.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 07:37:14 -0700   The only one I ever heard was in a band organ owned by Carston Henningston of Ye Olde Pizza Joynt fame. It was loud and shimmered - I thought it was pleasant but that it would grow tiresome quickly. I have probably heard others but didn't realize what I was hearing. The carousel at the Santa Cruz Boardwalk had the same sound. Bert   "How can I duplicate the sound of this stop? What does it sound like?" > Thanks, > Mick Berg.    
(back) Subject: RE: Resultant From: "Bert Atwood" <atwoody@ispchannel.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 07:45:28 -0700   Bob, seems to me the resultant would be louder (higher in amplitude) than either of its component tones since it is the sum (and difference) of the waveforms. Am I missing something here? Bert   > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of > Bob Scarborough > Sent: Thursday, July 13, 2000 9:14 PM > To: PipeChat > Subject: Re: Resultant   "Of course, the resultant tone cannot be any higher in amplitude than = either of its modulated tones; weakening either tune weakens the resultant by a proportional amount."    
(back) Subject: tuning quints From: <support@opensystemsorgans.com> Date: 14 Jul 2000 08:54:38 -0700   I always assumed that you tuned a quint not to beat, but something that = someone said recently suggested that it's tuned to the temperament. If = you're tuning to equal temperament, then, a quint's c would be in tune = with g, but not c.   Is this true?   Dick Meckstroth      
(back) Subject: Re: tuning quints From: <KurtvonS@aol.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 13:07:39 EDT   In a message dated 7/14/00 10:55:55 AM Central Daylight Time, support@opensystemsorgans.com writes:   << a quint's c would be in tune with g, but not c. Is this true? >> YES  
(back) Subject: Re: Doppelflutes (was Re: Unda Marii, Ersatz Gemshorns and Ernie-Boy) From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 10:39:20   At 09:02 AM 7/14/2000 -0500, you wrote: >I have wondered, how is a Doppelflute voiced.? >Would one mouth have to be closed up while the >other is voiced? Or could a good voicer tell which >mouth needs work?<snip>   By listening to each mouth independently. I fiddled with the supposed Roosevelt rank I mentioned earlier. One note was obviously "misfiring", so I did some surgery. Removing the cap revealed very little nicking on both mouths, supporting the claim that is was indeed a Roosevelt rank. An unfortunately placed spider nest was the cause of one of the mouths not performing properly. When speaking properly, this stop will emit the same amount of overtone components from both mouths, as near as is practical. The problem here, of course, is having the pipe in situ while maneurvering from one side of the rank to the other! An improvised "stethoscope" of tubing ameliorated this problem. With it, I was able to find some other problems in the rank on the rear-facing mouths.   Thinking back, it was a useful stop indeed. The two mouths indeed make for quick speech of fundamental, even with minimal nicking. However, the stop didn't "cough" unpleasantly like so many unnicked and lightly nicked stops are wont to do. I remember some =C6-S Nason Flutes coughing their third harmonic so loudly upon intonation that it sounded for all the world like a -3-series Hammond with the percussion on! I should point out that I cannot agree that "two narrow mouths equal one large one"; the harmonic content of the tone produced is much richer in the lower four odd harmonics than a similar gedackt or other fat stopped flute of the same total mouth width. If the Doppelfl=F6te was indeed tonally similar to a common gedackt, there would be no reason to build one!   I would recommend this stop being added to any organ of, say, 50 ranks or more. It has a multitude of tonal uses, and isn't limited to use in Romantic literature, as one might think.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: National Shrine of the Little Flower From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 10:47:25   At 10:22 AM 7/14/2000 EDT, you wrote: >Destroyed??<snip>   Although changed from Harrison's ideals, of which I am quite fond, I can't allow the word "destroyed" in such a case. I daresay the St. Thomas organ might be, not better or worse, but merely "different". From a historical standpoint, the original is lost, to be certain. But if what was produced after many changes is good, then it's good!   >as well as a >beautiful Flentrop pipe organ (yep, a tracker with no pistons and a flat >pedal board).<snip>   Ugh! I STILL curse Biggs for infecting the country to "FlentroMania", although his Busch-Reisinger performances are (well, for the most part) near and dear to me.   Flat pedalboards and "no pistons" relegate an instrument to a "period" description, and thus, make it suitable for only certain schools and styles, not to mention creating nightmares for visiting organists! The lack of modern appliances and the obsolete flat pedalboard are reprehensible in these modern times. Fortunately, in this case, it is in = a church, where confines of various musical schools can be gotten away with. Such is not suitable for a concert/recital venue of any breadth, however, as the few languishing Flentrops in university auditoria across the = country give mute testimony.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: RE: Resultant From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 11:06:50   At 07:45 AM 7/14/2000 -0700, you wrote: >Bob, seems to me the resultant would be louder (higher in amplitude) than >either of its component tones since it is the sum (and difference) of the >waveforms. Am I missing something here?<snip>   Yes. The two waveforms are not additive, since they are at different frequencies. The "sideband" frequencies, to borrow a radio/carrier term, cannot be any higher in amplitude than the lowest of its mixed components. This is easily demonstrated in the electrical example, but further complicated in the acoustic example by the presence of standing waves, reflections, and so on. Thus, electrical resultants are always of more reliable power. Hammond used them for years after discontinuing thier early 91 note generator just prior to World War II. The bottom octave of 16' tone was produced by a resultant. It is considered less satisfactory, however, than pure sine wave bass, due to the accompanying octave and nazard components of equal amplitude, which are more easily heard by the listener (refer to Fletcher-Munson curves from Bell Laboratories).   Hammond was more successful in producing a 32' resultant on its "Grande 100" series (the ones in the Klann consoles, the only Hammonds with upper harmonics reasonably on pitch, also), as they used LC filtering to tone down the second and third harmonics. Unfortunately, as was always the = case with Hammond, the bass-reflex cabinet and Dynaco amplfier supplied for the pedal channel were woefully inadequate to fill a structure of any size = with bass of proper amplitude. One shouldn't confuse this system with Hammond RT-series' Solovox-based Pedal Solo Units, which, because of transformer inadequacies, were unable to produce any real 32' tone down below about AAA. Hammond's dreadful tone cabinets of the era were completely unable = to produce real bass, anyway, due to their cheap and antiquated "radio console" design.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: tuning quints From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 11:21:23   At 08:54 AM 7/14/2000 -0700, you wrote: >I always assumed that you tuned a quint not to beat, but something that someone said recently suggested that it's tuned to the temperament.<snip>   You've probably misconstrued the resultant thread. All mutation stops are tuned true, to the unison's harmonic series.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: tuning quints From: "Luther Melby" <lmelby@prtel.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 13:50:29 -0500   If the mutation needs to be tuned true, would that then make it quite nessessary to have a set of pipes just for the mutation in order for it to sound it's best? As borrowing from other pipes would be off pitch due to ET. Luther -----Original Message----- From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Friday, July 14, 2000 12:19 PM     >At 08:54 AM 7/14/2000 -0700, you wrote: >>I always assumed that you tuned a quint not to beat, but something that >someone said recently suggested that it's tuned to the temperament.<snip> > >You've probably misconstrued the resultant thread. All mutation stops = are >tuned true, to the unison's harmonic series. > >DeserTBoB > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Resultant From: "Paul Soulek" <soulek@frontiernet.net> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 14:23:36 -0500   Bob Scarborough wrote: > > At 09:01 PM 7/13/2000 -0500, you wrote: > >I just realized that after I hit send- we have many small chamber = organs > >with 8' (actual length) stopped pipes and great bass.<snip> > > A stopped 8' (nominal) pipe speaks at 16' pitch, hence the "great bass".   That's what I meant. I shoud have been clearer.   Paul  
(back) Subject: Re: tuning quints From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 12:58:22   At 01:50 PM 7/14/2000 -0500, you wrote: >If the mutation needs to be tuned true, would that then make >it quite nessessary to have a set of pipes just for the mutation >in order for it to sound it's best? >As borrowing from other pipes would be off pitch due to ET.<snip>   I see where you're going on THIS one! A "straight" organ never has "borrowed", or unified, mutations. That's a theater organ and e-org specialty d'h=F4tel, and lends to the theater (and the Hammond's!) peculiar tonality. On organs meant to do serious repertoire, unified mutations should be avoided at all costs.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Riverside Concert From: "Ed Brown" <edbroorg@webtv.net> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 16:49:18 -0400 (EDT)   Was anyone on the list at the Riverside Church (NYC) concert this last Tuesday July11. Any opinions of the recital (including the broken crescendo pedal) Ed    
(back) Subject: Hook and Hastings Centennial Organ in St. Joseph's Old Cathedral in Buffalo, New York From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 18:59:33 -0400   Hi,   Well, the LP recording by Richard Morris, released by New World Records in 1976 for the Bicentennial, playing the 1876 E. & G. G. Hook & Hastings = built for the Philadelphia Centennial Celebration and subsequently installed at St. Joseph's Cathedral that recording is on CD now and sounds immensely better than it did on LP. Thanks for mentioning it, Bob Conway.   As I have opined before, the Dudley Buck Grand Sonata in E-flat is a wonderful piece, especially the scherzo movement and the final fugue on = Hail Columbia. The CD also contains works by Eugene Thayer, Horatio Parker, = John Knowles Paine, and George E. Whiting. It is available from OHS at http://www.ohscatalog.org Just use the search engine and enter "Morris" = and it will pop up. Or, hit the "recordings" button, then choose "American Music" from the next screen, and a large collection of CDs featuring American repertoire, including this one, will appear.   As may have been mentioned in earlier correspondence that I haven't seen, the organ is being both restored in all of its original stops and new divisions added by the Andover Organ Co.   Bill      
(back) Subject: Re: Flentrops et al. From: "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 20:01:07 -0400   > Such is not suitable for a concert/recital venue of any breadth, = however, > as the few languishing Flentrops in university auditoria across the = country > give mute testimony.   The blame for that sad state of affairs lies fully on the universities responsible. The thought of perfectly fine organs of _any_ make = languishing mutely anywhere pains me grievously and shows a complete lack of vision = and forsight on the part of the institutes in question. If they can't find = enough varied music for interesting concerts, I humbly submit that they just = aren't looking. There's more than just Bach or Sweelink that can played to = wonderful effect on those instruments.   However, I don't believe that any single organ can do proper justice to = all the music of every genre, except maybe some huge beast like Ocean Grove = (and even there I have my reservations). Oh yeah, Bach can be reinterpreted = very nicely on a romantic instrument. After all, wasn't it romantics like = Dupre, Liszt and Widor who were responsible for rediscovering Bach and reviving = the interest in his works? Personally, I like the chiff, though. (Yes, = anything can be overdone.) And a lot of good organs of previous eras had their = chiff nicked out later on by well-intentioned bunglers.   I am all for the more the merrier concept! A couple of good = representative organs or three for different styles - baroque, romantic and even theater! =   I'm with Scott here, but allow me to expand on his statement. "Don't = throw out a perfectly good instrument [of ANY make] JUST TO SATISFY A FAD or personal ego." Go for both! "...once the old organ is gone it will never =   come back and will eventually be missed." And that _includes_ the = trackers.   Cheers, Tommylee    
(back) Subject: Re: National Shrine of the Little Flower From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 20:15:53 EDT   In a message dated 7/14/00 10:37:57 AM Eastern Daylight Time, ScottFop@aol.com writes:   << But what I do not appreciate is when an organist come into a new position and persuades the church to throw out the old (which is more = often that not an EP of a more romantic nature) and put in a tracker of more limited resources. That is what upsets me. Put in all the trackers you want to, but don't throw out a perfectly good and functioning romantic = instrument JUST TO SATISFY A FAD or personal ego. >>   This has been going on for generations... yea! hundreds of years. It = is tragic, but it effects ALL styles of instruments, no just EP being = replaced by trackers.   AEolian-Skinner is probably the MOST guilty of tossing out venerable old instruments to replace them with their "current fad" work. This is in = now way disparaging toward A-S; they were just doing what the customer wanted. = Many of the wonderful instruments they built, replaced or modified instruments that we now wish had been preserved. And, since then, many = of these A-S instruments have been replaced by yet another "fad" instrument because these church have lots of money, and want to be at the head of = the game. It life!   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com HOWLING ACRES: http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Doppelflutes (was Re: Unda Marii, Ersatz Gemshorns and Ernie-Boy) From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 20:23:05 EDT   In a message dated 7/14/00 1:49:37 PM Eastern Daylight Time, desertbob@rglobal.net writes:   << I would recommend this stop being added to any organ of, say, 50 ranks = or more. It has a multitude of tonal uses, and isn't limited to use in Romantic literature, as one might think. >> Mercy! What cheat all those folks with smaller organs. I once did some =   restorative work on a 1908 Moller (mechanical manuals; tubular pedal) with =   the following spec (the Doppelflute was really wonderful, and quite versatile): GREAT Open Diapason 8 Doppelflute 8 (double from tc) Violin 8 Dulciana 8 Octave 4 Flute d' Amour 4 (wood with pierced stoppers)   SWELL Bourdon 16 tc Open Diapason 8 Stopped Flute 8 Salicional 8 Voix Celeste 8 tc AEoline 8 Harmonic Flute 4 Flautina 2 Oboe 8 Tremolo   PEDAL Bourdon 16 Lieblich Gedeckt 16     Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com HOWLING ACRES: http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502