PipeChat Digest #1516 - Saturday, July 15, 2000
 
Re: National Shrine of the Little Flower
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Flentrops et al.
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Flentrops
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Flentrops et al.
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Flentrops et al.
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Doppelflutes (was Re: Unda Marii, Ersatz Gemshorns and    Ernie-Boy)
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
Re: Doppelflutes (was Re: Unda Marii, Ersatz Gemshorns and    Ernie-Boy)
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: tuning quints
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
the all-purpose organ
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
"Moaner" Mollers
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: "Moaner" Mollers
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
Re: tuning quints
  by "Luther Melby" <lmelby@prtel.com>
silence
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Aeolines (Re: "Moaner" Mollers)
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Flentrops
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: the all-purpose organ
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: "Moaner" Mollers
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Aeolines (Re: "Moaner" Mollers)
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Aeolines (Re: "Moaner" Mollers)
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Flentrops
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
An Unusual Musical Happening! (X-Posted)
  by <Devon3000@aol.com>
Re: "Moaner" Mollers
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
E.M. Skinner - Emmanuel Episcopal, Cleveland
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: National Shrine of the Little Flower From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 20:31:57 EDT   In a message dated 7/14/00 1:58:07 PM Eastern Daylight Time, desertbob@rglobal.net writes:   << From a historical standpoint, the original is lost, to be certain. B >>   Then that would be "destroyed". Whassamater?? Can't face it!! ;-)   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com HOWLING ACRES: http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Flentrops et al. From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 17:18:28   At 08:01 PM 7/14/2000 -0400, you wrote: >"...once the old organ is gone it will never >come back and will eventually be missed." And that _includes_ the trackers.<schniipwerken>   That's a favorite slogan of junk collectors like me, too!   Certainly, Flentrops were/are great "period" organs, probably some of the best ever to hit this shore. The balance of choruses within divisions is incredibly delicate in all I've ever heard; a treat for all ears. Still, DON'T get out the Franck near one! Yuck pooie!   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Flentrops From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 17:50:44 -0700   I think perhaps the case for Flentrops as "period" organs has been somewhat overstated ... friends in Europe have told me that they're simply modern Dutch organs ... they're AMAZED at all the fuss made over them in this country ... I guess they're considered pretty middle-class in Holland.   The point is that (in Dutch Reformed services, at least) Flentrops do what they're needed to do, no muss, no fuss: play big Bach and Buxtehude pieces, and play the hymns/chorales.   I gather Dutch RC organs tend to be built more toward the French romantic, unless they happen to be historic in their own right.   While there MIGHT be other electro-pneumatic builders active in Holland, I can only think of one, and I can't remember how to spell his name (grin) ... junky organs, in any case ... basketball-bounce valves, etc.   Does anybody know what the "rebuild" of the big Flentrop in St. Mark's, Seattle involves?   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: Flentrops et al. From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 20:48:54 EDT   In a message dated 7/14/00 7:59:10 PM Eastern Daylight Time, tommylee@whitlock.org writes:   << However, I don't believe that any single organ can do proper justice to =   all the music of every genre, except maybe some huge beast like Ocean Grove = (and even there I have my reservations). >>   Smart boy! Hold that thought!!! ;-)   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com HOWLING ACRES: http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Flentrops et al. From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 20:51:32 EDT   In a message dated 7/14/00 8:45:09 PM Eastern Daylight Time, desertbob@rglobal.net writes:   << Certainly, Flentrops were/are great "period" organs, probably some of = the best ever to hit this shore. The balance of choruses within divisions is incredibly delicate in all I've ever heard; a treat for all ears. Still, DON'T get out the Franck near one! Yuck pooie! >>   Franck can be played very nicely on Flentrop. I prefer that over a more =   homogenized, characterless instrument!   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com HOWLING ACRES: http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Re: Doppelflutes (was Re: Unda Marii, Ersatz Gemshorns and Ernie-Boy) From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 20:03:20 -0500   At 7/14/00 10:39 AM, DeserTBoB wrote: >I should point out that I cannot >agree that "two narrow mouths equal one large one"; the harmonic content of >the tone produced is much richer in the lower four odd harmonics than a >similar gedackt or other fat stopped flute of the same total mouth width. >If the Doppelfl=F6te was indeed tonally similar to a common gedackt, there >would be no reason to build one!   As the one that sorta suggested the "2 narrow =3D 1 large" mouth width theor= y of the Doppelflute, I'd like to expound a bit more on what I *really* meant. (it was early -- I had to get to work!)   Disclaimer: I have no intention of attempting to seem an "absolute authority" on such things -- I am simply trying to relate theories and practical information as given me by people whom I trust. Given these and a bit of logic, the following has always seemed sensible to me...but of course there is room for error and further education. (gee -- ain't this list great for that!) Also, I have done no sort of research into the particular "harmonic trains" produced by doppels *or* standard stopped flutes, other than that which can be observed by simply listening to them.   In retrospect, it seems that perhaps it would have been more accurate for me to have suggested "2 narrow =3D 1 EXTRA large mouth (in width only) for any given cross section of pipe body. I'd think, though, that there are obviously more factors than just mouth width coming into play in the design of a doppelflute. =20   It occurs to me that many "typical" stopped flutes are built in nearly a square cross section, with the mouth occupying one side. Most are actually *slightly* rectangular in cross section, but the mouth is on the shorter of the 2 dimensions, in all but the most extreme of examples. This should result in up to a 1/4 mouth width (not cutup!) for any given pipe, at most -- usually a bit less. The more 'rectangular' a single-mouthed pipe gets, the narrower that mouth gets in relation to the cross-sectional area of the pipe.=20   Doppelflutes, on the other hand, are seldom built in a 'square-ish' cross section. Most examples I've seen are decidedly deeper than wide -- often about twice as much (though I have also seen a few examples that were more square in cross section as well). The mouths on these pipes are also always on the narrower dimension. This should result in an approx 1/3 mouth width. If our theoretical doppelflute pipe now *does* become square in cross section, the total mouth width would increase to approx 1/2. We're getting pretty wide here...<g>!   Of course, you must also factor in the cutups to these "magical equations" -- and on examples I've seen (including the one I am examining as I write this, and one from another set I examined at the shop this afternoon for reference) I tend to think that cutups on doppelflutes remain rather lower than any similarly-scaled single-mouth pipe. "Typical" single-mouth stopped flutes tend to exhibit generally higher cutups to produce the same level of sound (unless they are of the 'xylophonic" variety, that is!)   So, overall, it seems that doppelflutes would exhibit tendencies toward generally over-wide, low-cut mouths for any given level of output volume. Add to *this* the influences of windway size and treatment, wind pressure, and a few other odd factors, and I'll bet you're starting to discover the difference between the "delicious, liquid doppelflute" and the "hoot-flute from h***", at least as far as doppels go.   It would certainly be interesting to see what one could do with a single-mouthed stopped flute if you were to put the mouth on the *long* side -- I'd think that the results would start to approach typical doppelflute tonality (unless you cut it up high and blew it too hard, thereby yielding a lovely potential Tibia! LOL)   DB -- I didn't mean to imply for a second that doppelflutes are "tonally similar to a common gedackt" -- indeed in my experience nothing could be further from the truth (and this is the reason why I am so fond of doppelflutes!). All the above is just what I've come up with when I start to think about some of the possible reasons why they are *not*.   Speaking out of both sides of my mouth <wink> --   Tim Bovard Little Rock AR     =20    
(back) Subject: Re: Doppelflutes (was Re: Unda Marii, Ersatz Gemshorns and Ernie-Boy) From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 18:00:57   At 08:23 PM 7/14/2000 EDT, you wrote: >I once did some=20 >restorative work on a 1908 Moller (mechanical manuals; tubular pedal) with= =20 >the following spec (the Doppelflute was really wonderful, and quite=20 >versatile):<schniip>   Nifty, even though the spec is typical 1900 "moaner" stuff...lotsa color in that box! Thinking more about it, I could see where the Doppel on the Great would be a wonderfully versatile stop, even for some solo work as a foil to the Swell's c=E8leste. Luckily this was a tracker and not the dreaded "bar and membrane" chests which we've all had to deal with at one time or another. A cute little organ for a small church, no doubt...just stay away from the counterpoint! I've played M=F6llers very similar to this= , but wasn't lucky enough to have the Doppel on the Great.   dB  
(back) Subject: Re: tuning quints From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Sat, 15 Jul 2000 09:01:00 +0800   It's not going to make a noticeable difference at that frequency (i.e. if = the resultant is at 32' or 64') Bob E.   Luther Melby wrote:   > If the mutation needs to be tuned true, would that then make > it quite nessessary to have a set of pipes just for the mutation > in order for it to sound it's best? > As borrowing from other pipes would be off pitch due to ET. > Luther > -----Original Message----- > From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@rglobal.net> > Date: Friday, July 14, 2000 12:19 PM > > >At 08:54 AM 7/14/2000 -0700, you wrote: > >>I always assumed that you tuned a quint not to beat, but something = that > >someone said recently suggested that it's tuned to the = temperament.<snip> > > > >You've probably misconstrued the resultant thread. All mutation stops = are > >tuned true, to the unison's harmonic series. > > > >DeserTBoB > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org   -- ----------------------------------------------------- Click here for Free Video!! http://www.gohip.com/freevideo/      
(back) Subject: the all-purpose organ From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 18:10:12 -0700   At the risk of sounding like a broken record, I think the "average" three-manual Hook of 30-40 stops can play MOST things convincingly, albeit with a uniquely American accent.   True, they usually don't have everything on the Choir organ needed for a secondary chorus and/or Franck (you usually have to use the Swell for the former, and your imagination for the latter); you have to rely on the pedal couplers for the pedal line (unless you happen to be playing Holy Cross Cathedral in Boston), but those things can be done, and they WORK.   I don't think we should compare Franck on a Flentrop to Franck on an American orchestral organ of the teens or twenties, even an E.M. Skinner or a good Austin, Kimball, Kilgen, Welte, etc. ... NONE of those organ were/are any more suitable for Franck (in their own way) than a Flentrop at its warmest. Symphonic-style diapasons, flutes, strings, reeds, mixtures (if there ARE any) bear little if any resemblance to a Cavaille-Coll, which, among other things, still had recognizable choruses and mixtures.   As has been pointed out before, GDH *knew* how to build C-C reeds; he DIDN'T, for the simple reason that (1) he didn't LIKE them (supposedly) and (2) they would have sounded HORRIBLE in the average American church. We only have a handful of churches in this country in which unaltered C-C voicing techniques could be used successfully. It takes a whole LOT of acoustics to absorb and temper all THAT racket (grin).   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: "Moaner" Mollers From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 18:15:21 -0700   Hey, Bob! You need all those stops to accompany anthems and Services by Caleb Simper, Berthold Tours, Carrie Adams, John West, etc. etc. etc. (grin).   I still wanna know what they did with those Swell Aeolines, though ... maybe you COULD hear them when the organs were new and the wind-leaks and the Spencer concrete mixers didn't drown 'em out (grin).   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: "Moaner" Mollers From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 20:32:31 -0500   At 7/14/00 06:15 PM, Bud wrote:   >I still wanna know what they did with those Swell Aeolines, though ... >maybe you COULD hear them when the organs were new and the wind-leaks >and the Spencer concrete mixers didn't drown 'em out (grin).     Subtract the noise of wind leaks and Orgoblos (if even they had *those* yet) and then remember that the world was probably a generally much = quieter place back then...Also missing from the 'ambient roar of silence" would = be:   passing cars/trucks/buses loud stereos/boom cars HVAC systems planes/helicopters going over sound-system "hum" and "hiss" police (etc) sirens buzzy light fixtures etc. etc. etc...<g>   Those Aeolines didn't have nearly the "roar of silence" to compete with then as they would now!!   As the saying goes, "the silence would be deafening"!! Must have been = nice!   Tim        
(back) Subject: Re: tuning quints From: "Luther Melby" <lmelby@prtel.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 20:34:03 -0500   After I wrote that letter, I looked up the Quint in the book. I realized that it would make no difference in the bass but for some dumb reason I was thinking of 5ths up wards on the scale. I should have looked before writing. Even the word "quint" does not sound like deeeep bass to me. Luther -----Original Message----- From: Bob Elms <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Friday, July 14, 2000 6:44 PM Subject: Re: tuning quints     >It's not going to make a noticeable difference at that frequency (i.e. if the >resultant is at 32' or 64') >Bob E. > >Luther Melby wrote: > >> If the mutation needs to be tuned true, would that then make >> it quite nessessary to have a set of pipes just for the mutation >> in order for it to sound it's best? >> As borrowing from other pipes would be off pitch due to ET. >> Luther >    
(back) Subject: silence From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 18:45:49 -0700   I spent a couple of years in a small village high in the San Bernardino Mountains, recovering from surgery. While we did have the noise of the search and destroy (oops ... rescue) helicopters from time to time, mostly all you could hear was the creek, since we were at the top of a miles-long dead-end road. There were no street-lamps ... our view of the comet was spectacular. And I discovered that air isn't a solid after all, having lived in San Diego and LA.   To attach some relevance to all this, there were two churches on the mountain, and one organ (I think) ... a Gulbransen theatre organ in the Seventh-Day Adventist church. There was a big organ of some description in one of the castles further down the mountain ... my roommate saw it when he was precinct-walking ... but the owner wasn't friendly, so we never found out anything about it. And my little Episcopal church on the edge of the desert (about an hour away) had a moribund Hammond Concert Model, now replaced by a small Allen.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Aeolines (Re: "Moaner" Mollers) From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 21:52:01 EDT   Now this is a cool thread! We have an Aeoline at the National Shrine and=20 when I arrived in June 1998 it was, as mentioned below in other posts, barel= y=20 audible if that good. As the organ came into better playing condition and=20 wind noise diminished, it was regulated by Brant Duddy this past February an= d=20 tuned slightly sharp, between the Salicional and Voix C=E9l=E8ste, as a "min= or"=20 c=E9l=E8ste- the Voix being the major c=E9l=E8ste- thereby giving our Swell=20= a three=20 rank string c=E9l=E8ste. The Aeoline is absolutely beautiful and works well= too=20 with only the Flauto Dolce and Flute C=E9l=E8ste. One of my favorite=20 registrations is:   SWELL (box totally shut!): 8 Voix C=E9l=E8ste, 8 Flauto Dolce, 8 Flute C=E9l=E8ste, 8 Aeoline, 8 Vox Hu= mana,=20 Tremulant, 16 Swell to Swell   PEDAL: 32 Resultant PP, 16 Echo Bourdon, 16 Contra Gambe, 8 Still Gedeckt, Swell to= =20 Pedal   Played in the normal middle range of the manual with the box shut or almost=20 totally shut, it produces the most unique and beautiful shimmery effect,=20 extremely haunting and lyrical. Then one can add it to the Choir 8 Dulciana= =20 and 8 Unda Maris (with trem) and then the Choir super coupler, then we start= =20 the melodies on the Solo wood harmonic Flauto Mirabilis with trem (also=20 beginning with the box shut) or the Antiphonal Swell Oboe with trem, etc etc= =20 etc. =3Do) (Goosebumps anyone?)   But the Aeoline is a VERY useful stop in my opinion, when used in a manner=20 that it best adds its sound to an ensemble, especially in Liturgy when=20 improvisation is needed and softer, ethereal effects are used.   Regarding the traffic and other outside noises, the Shrine is a stone and=20 concrete fortress that sits on an angular lot at the crossroads of Woodward=20 Avenue and Twelve Mile Road- so even in the middle of the day it is rather=20 silent inside unless there is an 18-wheeler barreling down Woodward or=20 something like that.   Scott F. Foppiano, National Shrine of the Little Flower   In a message dated 7/14/00 9:31:30 PM Eastern Daylight Time,=20 tmbovard@arkansas.net writes:   << >I still wanna know what they did with those Swell Aeolines, though ... >maybe you COULD hear them when the organs were new and the wind-leaks >and the Spencer concrete mixers didn't drown 'em out (grin). =20 =20 Subtract the noise of wind leaks and Orgoblos (if even they had *those* yet) and then remember that the world was probably a generally much quieter place back then...Also missing from the 'ambient roar of silence" would be: =20 passing cars/trucks/buses loud stereos/boom cars HVAC systems planes/helicopters going over sound-system "hum" and "hiss" police (etc) sirens buzzy light fixtures etc. etc. etc...<g> =20 Those Aeolines didn't have nearly the "roar of silence" to compete with then as they would now!! =20 As the saying goes, "the silence would be deafening"!! Must have been nice= ! >>  
(back) Subject: Re: Flentrops From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 18:35:16   At 05:50 PM 7/14/2000 -0700, you wrote: >... they're AMAZED at all the fuss made over >them in this country ... I guess they're considered pretty middle-class >in Holland.<snip>   Ah! See? There IS a sensibility of an "American" organ, then, isn't there?   >The point is that (in Dutch Reformed services, at least) Flentrops do >what they're needed to do, no muss, no fuss: play big Bach and Buxtehude >pieces, and play the hymns/chorales.   Flentrop is to Dutch Reformed as =C6-S is to rich "Frozen Chosen" over here!   >Does anybody know what the "rebuild" of the big Flentrop in St. Mark's, >Seattle involves?<snip>   What?? Trackers needing "rebuilds"? Oh my, I didn't think it was possible!! <SEG>   dB  
(back) Subject: Re: the all-purpose organ From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 18:44:37   At 06:10 PM 7/14/2000 -0700, you wrote: >a good Austin, Kimball, Kilgen, Welte, etc. ... NONE of those organ >were/are any more suitable for Franck (in their own way) than a Flentrop >at its warmest. Symphonic-style diapasons, flutes, strings, reeds, >mixtures (if there ARE any) bear little if any resemblance to a >Cavaille-Coll, which, among other things, still had recognizable >choruses and mixtures.<snip>   True enough. Well put.   >As has been pointed out before, GDH *knew* how to build C-C reeds; he >DIDN'T, for the simple reason that (1) he didn't LIKE them (supposedly) >and (2) they would have sounded HORRIBLE in the average American church. >We only have a handful of churches in this country in which unaltered >C-C voicing techniques could be used successfully. It takes a whole LOT >of acoustics to absorb and temper all THAT racket (grin).<snip>   True again. Harrison knew the difference between the neighborhood barn = and the huge edifaces of France. His goal was to get the effect "at the listener's ear"...rather than what went on in the organ itself. Thus, = from an AUDIENCE'S vantage point, many of Harrison's chorus reed tendencies worked out for the best, given the huge difference in acoustic environments. Still, even in the middle of the church, one can't call Harrison's reed tone "French", precisely, although he was wont to call = them as such. Harrison had a tough time escaping his English roots, to be certain. On the other hand, I surely wouldn't call them "colorless" or "indifferent"! Those that refuse to compromise on anything didn't like = his work mainly because he did just that. As anyone who has done engineering work in the physical disciplines knows, successful design is the art of compromise itself!   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: "Moaner" Mollers From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 18:48:57   At 06:15 PM 7/14/2000 -0700, you wrote: >I still wanna know what they did with those Swell Aeolines, though= ...<snip>   Well, when the organ isn't wheezing so badly that wind leaks compete with tone, they ARE useful for very quiet, delicate passages! I've heard exactly what you're speaking of, however..."is it PLAYING?? Turn the blower off so I can HEAR it!" Usually, this happened in heavily compromised installations. Poor pipe placement was another M=F6ller characteristic for decades; burying the poor =C6oline at the rear of the box is a sure way to kill it off!   DeserTBoB   PS: Most (later) M=F6llers came with Kinetics, not Spencer "Putty-putties"...to borrow from Spike Jones....  
(back) Subject: Re: Aeolines (Re: "Moaner" Mollers) From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 19:22:54   At 09:52 PM 7/14/2000 EDT, you wrote: >SWELL (box totally shut!): >8 Voix C=E9l=E8ste, 8 Flauto Dolce, 8 Flute C=E9l=E8ste, 8 Aeoline, 8 Vox= Humana,=20 >Tremulant, 16 Swell to Swell > >PEDAL: >32 Resultant PP, 16 Echo Bourdon, 16 Contra Gambe, 8 Still Gedeckt, Swell= to=20 >Pedal   Virgil Fox....paging Mr. Virgil Fox....your registration is ready...  
(back) Subject: Re: Aeolines (Re: "Moaner" Mollers) From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 22:54:12 EDT   In a message dated 7/14/00 10:44:40 PM Eastern Daylight Time,=20 desertbob@rglobal.net writes:   << >SWELL (box totally shut!): >8 Voix C=E9l=E8ste, 8 Flauto Dolce, 8 Flute C=E9l=E8ste, 8 Aeoline, 8 Vox=20= Humana,=20 >Tremulant, 16 Swell to Swell > >PEDAL: >32 Resultant PP, 16 Echo Bourdon, 16 Contra Gambe, 8 Still Gedeckt, Swell=20 to=20 >Pedal =20 Virgil Fox....paging Mr. Virgil Fox....your registration is ready... >>   No- Virgil would have registered a FULL PEDAL for that one! hee hee  
(back) Subject: Re: Flentrops From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 23:00:10 EDT   Dear Bud:   As far as I can tell, Paul Fritts added a 32' Wooden Bombard in the pedal = a full length stop, a 16' and 8' reed to the Hauptwerk, and installed a suspended =   tracker action, as the old one was too stiff to play. The organ sounds wonderful, = so not to worry, Paul does excellent work. Some revoicing was required after all these years and a complete cleaning. It's a marvelous organ and Franck is very possible. I really liked it!   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: An Unusual Musical Happening! (X-Posted) From: <Devon3000@aol.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 23:02:32 EDT   The Village of Naperville, Illinois has a series of carillon concerts on = the new "Millennium Carillon", the idea of one resident, who, three years ago persuaded common citizens to give their individual contributions, as well = as area business contributions that will total over 3 million dollars!! 6 octaves of 72 bells, from Holland, mounted on a beautiful new tower 158 = feet tall. We have heard 3 of the ten concerts for dedication week, and they = have been awesome. Attendance and audience excitement for Trevor Workman's performance (From England) was so great they've scheduled an extra concert = by him Saturday, tomorrow evening. He plays very much like an organist, = making organistic sounds, massive as well as very subtle.   Transcriptions have been mostly what has been played, of classic and = popular tunes. There will be guest carilloneurs on Tuesday evenings the rest of = July and August. The weather has been fantastic so far.   If you are anywhere near the western suburbs, they have a civic gem you should hear. It will play from digital player (mechanical, of course), a couple times each day throughout the year.   Makes me wonder if someday someone in a city or village might get the idea = to build a new civic concert hall with a monumental organ in it. Three = million might do it nicely. Or maybe some more of those languishing old existing halls will be fixed up by the cities they reside in. Apparently, all it takes is one loud mouth, with a lot of charisma and work in addition, but = it continues to happen. If only Naperville would consider helping the North Central College restore the auditorium Kimball, in its day a grand old = organ, but I fear it is destroyed by one person who really did a number on it = awhile back, and it has been unused for years.   It's nice to hear of people working together on a major musical project. Hope to hear of many more in the near future. Come and see and hear it!   Devon Hollingsworth, in Chicago Suburbs  
(back) Subject: Re: "Moaner" Mollers From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 23:14:22 EDT   In a message dated 7/14/00 11:12:49 PM Eastern Daylight Time,=20 desertbob@rglobal.net writes:   << Poor pipe placement was another M=F6ller characteristic for decades; burying the poor =C6oline at the rear of the bo= x is a sure way to kill it off! >>   That's funny- my Aeoline is the second rank in from the shutters, right=20 behind the Oboe d'Amor.   Scott F  
(back) Subject: E.M. Skinner - Emmanuel Episcopal, Cleveland From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 20:33:14 -0700   Does anybody have access to something that would have the stoplist of this organ? The console burned so many years ago, I don't think anyone in Cleveland still remembers what was on it.   Cheers,   Bud