PipeChat Digest #1538 - Friday, July 28, 2000
 
Re: Bach Recital Program
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: Bach Recital Program
  by <support@opensystemsorgans.com>
Concert announcement, Lewisville, TX (cross-posted)
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
Re: Bach Recital Program
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Re: Bach Recital Program
  by "Stephen F. P. Karr" <karr_sf@acadmn.mercer.edu>
Re: Hidden vs Exposed
  by "Erik Johnson" <the_maitre@hotmail.com>
Bob Dilworth's Email address needed
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Concert announcement, Lewisville, TX (cross-posted)
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Bach Jewish?
  by "Stanley E Yoder" <syoder+@andrew.cmu.edu>
Re: Bob Dilworth's Email address needed
  by "Dick Metzger" <dick@netreach.net>
Re: retiring
  by "Chris Baker" <chorale@clara.co.uk>
Re: Bach Jewish?
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca>
Re: Concert announcement, Lewisville, TX (cross-posted)
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
Today's New York Times x-posted
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Today's New York Times x-posted
  by "Dr. Charles E. Brown" <chabrown@impop.bellatlantic.net>
Re: Today's New York Times x-posted
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Hidden vs Exposed
  by <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Bach Recital Program From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2000 20:51:09 +0800   Yes and some people say Shakespeare's plays weren't written by = Shakespeare, but how would they know? Bob E.   Bob Scarborough wrote: Ah! I thought that some bunch of academics popped up not long ago and = said   > that the "Eight Little..." weren't Bach's at all, but were possibly = penned > by his students. Anyone know the story on this? > > DeserTBoB > > "    
(back) Subject: Re: Bach Recital Program From: <support@opensystemsorgans.com> Date: 27 Jul 2000 06:54:58 -0700   > Toccata and Fugue in d-minor (the usual)   The academics say the same thing about this piece that they say about the = Eight Little. Personally, I hope they're right.   > I can't remember the exact nickname of the "Cathedral" e-minor's fugue. = > From the recurrent motif with the mordent, it is called the "Hunting = Horn" or > something like that. Help! (please)   Is it "posthorn"?   Dick Meckstroth      
(back) Subject: Concert announcement, Lewisville, TX (cross-posted) From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2000 09:12:54 -0500   This month is our organ's 10th birthday - and, as we all know, tomorrow is the Bach anniversary - this Sunday is also promotion Sunday at my church and the end of summer for our school folks - and it is a 5th Sunday of a month. So..... Our 5th Sunday series concert celebrates all these things. The program also fits in with our recent threads on what we're doing for the Bach anniversary, and programming that provides "something for everyone".   When - Sunday, July 30, approximately 12:10 Where - First United Methodist Church, Lewisville, Texas Concert will be followed by covered-dish lunch in Family Life Center Here is the program, with a couple of annotations:     ORGAN PLUS! A 10th Birthday Celebration for our Organ Dr. Margo Dillard, organist   Prelude and Fugue in G Major...J. S. Bach   Without a Song......Vincent Youmans Paul Burnett, baritone   Cantate Domino (O Sing Unto the Lord)...Giammateo Asola Cantate Domino [this is the group that ya'll helped name - 1st performance]   When Mother Played the Organ, and Daddy Sang a Hymn....George McConnell Carol Anderson, soprano   Evening and Morning..................Paul Manz Brandi Southwell and Vicki Carson, flutes   My Song in the Night.............Paul Christiansen Cantate Domino   The Lost Chord.........................Arthur Sullivan Chellie Adams, alto   La Bamba..................................Ramon Noble Justfied [this is a group of guys in our church, boomers, who have a sort of "garage band" - they generally play rock or R&B and put religious words to 50s and 60s music - they all play by ear - they've got a bass, 2 guitars, tpt, tbone, sax and drums - and they are EXTREMELY excited about getting to play something with the organ]   Sheep May Safely Graze, from Cantata 208 (Birthday Cantata)...J. S. Bach   Irene Morris, Piano   [at this point, the material that follows the program will be read]   Trio Sonata in E-flat: II. Adagio..............................................J. S. Bach   In dir ist Freude (In Thee is Joy)..............................................J. S. Bach   READINGS   Friday (July 28) was the 250th anniversary of the death of Johann Sebastian Bach, organist, harpsichordist, cantor, choir master, and the greatest composer of sacred music of all time -- a man of great faith, who signed every composition =93Soli Deo Gloria=94 =96 To the Glory of God only.   =93Bach opens a vista to the universe. After experiencing him, people feel there is meaning to life after all.=94 (Helmut Walcha)   =93If I had lost all my religious faith, this thing alone would be sufficient to restore it.=94 (Felix Mendelssohn, after playing one of Bach=92s choral preludes.)   =93If Bach continues to play in this way, the organ will be ruined in two years, or most of the congregation will be deaf=94 (member of the council of the church at Arnstadt)   =93There is nothing to it. You only have to hit the right notes at the right time and the instrument plays itself.=94 (J. S. Bach)   =93Lamented Bach! Your touch upon the organ=92s keys Long since has earned you company among the great, And what your quill upon the music-sheet has writ Has filled hearts with delight, though some did envy seize.=94 (Georg Phillip Telemann)   =93It is as though eternal harmony were conversing with itself, as it may have happened in God=92s bosom shortly before he created the world.=94 (Johann von Goethe)   =93The immortal god of harmony.=94 (Ludwig van Beethoven)   =93Too much counterpoint =96 and what is worse, Protestant = counterpoint.=94 (Sir Thomas Beecham)   =93Bach is a colossus of Rhodes, beneath whom all musicians pass and will continue to pass. Mozart is the most beautiful, Rossini the most brilliant, but Bach is the most comprehensive: he has said all there is to say.=94 (Charles Gounod)   =93A benevolent god, to whom musicians should offer a prayer before setting to work so that they may be preserved from mediocrity.=94 (Claude Debussy)   =93I have always kept one end in view, namely, with all good will to conduct a well regulated church music to the honor of God.=94 (J. S. Bach)     SERVICE MUSIC 8:30 & 11:00 Prelude Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme.........................................J. S. Bach (Wake, awake for night is flying) Offertory Von Gott will ich night lassen.............................................J. S. Bach (From God will nothing part me) Postlude Fantasia super Komm Heiliger Geist...................................J. S. Bach (Come, Holy Ghost) At some point in the service, the prayer graciously shared by Robert Waldrop will be read.    
(back) Subject: Re: Bach Recital Program From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2000 11:21:00 EDT   In a message dated 7/27/00 12:22:24 AM Eastern Daylight Time, Cremona502@cs.com writes:   << In Remembrance of of Bach Friday, 28 July, 12:15 (following Noon Prayers) >>     Bruce -   Wish I could be there!   Vicki Ceruti  
(back) Subject: Re: Bach Recital Program From: "Stephen F. P. Karr" <karr_sf@acadmn.mercer.edu> Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2000 11:29:28 -0400   Says DeserT BoB...   > Ah! I thought that some bunch of academics popped up not long ago and = said > that the "Eight Little..." weren't Bach's at all, but were possibly = penned > by his students. Anyone know the story on this?   They did, but opinion seems to be swinging the other way now. Harald Vogel is leading the charge back to believing that Bach wrote them. He's recorded them on a pedal clavichord and theorizes that it was an experiment for old J. S. in the Galant style...then he decided he didn't like writing that way and adopted the style for which we all know him.   -Stephen Karr  
(back) Subject: Re: Hidden vs Exposed From: "Erik Johnson" <the_maitre@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2000 11:42:39 EDT   Now Bruce... Of course I participate in the mass. However...during the homliy is the time I use to change,get,tune,stop, what-ever I need to do. = I listen to the homliy at least once for every priest we have (2). However, =   please don't expect me to listen to the same homily three-five times on = the weekend! Please - it wasn't that good to begin with, the fifth time certainly hasn't made it any better! ;-)   And don't forget choral decorum! One time I simply had to get off the = bench to 'shushhh' the choir from thier loud giggling when our asscociate was reciting his newest poem "Seaweed Soup" for his homily!   I also will change music (esp. and choir anthem - if it better fits the homily). Trust me the choir just LOVES me when I do that!   And let's face it...it could be worse. I know of a very well know = Cathedral organist who plays at a large cathedral on Fifth Ave in NY who every = chance they get goes out for a smoke between songs. Nuff said.   All the Best, Erik > >However, whenever I play a service I am well prepared to the point that I >don't need to do all that stuff people are complaining about doing. I >played in a large RC parish and directed the choir, but still did not use >extra books pre-assembled for convenience (they leave no room for = change). >I did not use the pistons on the 2/21 organ, but it only took a few = second >to >select the stops I needed. I was always able to participate in the Mass, =   >and >the only time I left the room was when I had to take care of a problem >(speakers off in the cry room, mikes not working, etc). It's simply a >matter >of being prepared and well-practiced. The pistons were set up so that I >could make spontaneous changes in registration at will. The scout's = motto >holds true: be prepared! > >Bruce   ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Bob Dilworth's Email address needed From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2000 12:24:03 EDT   I am trying to find Bob Dilworth's email address. He is involved with the =   DTOS (Dickinson Theatre Organ Society). We lost our data base at church = and I lost all my addresses etc.   Any help will be greatly appreciated. Thanks!   Scott Foppiano  
(back) Subject: Re: Concert announcement, Lewisville, TX (cross-posted) From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2000 13:05:56 EDT   What a nice programme. You're going to be veddy veddy tired come Sunday night! What is the organ?   Bruce .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com HOWLING ACRES: http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502  
(back) Subject: Bach Jewish? From: "Stanley E Yoder" <syoder+@andrew.cmu.edu> Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2000 14:42:28 -0400 (EDT)   Someone mentioned that he was. First time I heard that. What's the = authority? Stan Yoder Pittsburgh  
(back) Subject: Re: Bob Dilworth's Email address needed From: "Dick Metzger" <dick@netreach.net> Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2000 14:52:11 -0400   Scott,   I have Bob Dilworth's e-mail address as redtos@voicenet.com Hope that is current.   Dick Metzger TOSDV Theatre Organ Society of the Delaware Valley   >I am trying to find Bob Dilworth's email address. He is involved with = the >DTOS (Dickinson Theatre Organ Society). We lost our data base at church and >I lost all my addresses etc. > >Any help will be greatly appreciated. Thanks! > >Scott Foppiano >    
(back) Subject: Re: retiring From: "Chris Baker" <chorale@clara.co.uk> Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2000 19:03:17 +0100     From: Ray Thursby To: PipeChat Sent: Thursday, July 27, 2000 5:23 AM   > Ordinarily I'd stay out of a discussion like this, but I make my living in > another "creative" field that is suffering from a similar malaise. > > Obviously, I don't know the conditions in the church where Bob Elms plays, > but if they are taking in money some of it should go back out to the > organist. A professional, one who has learned his or her craft/art deserves > payment for their work, and it is the availability of "volunteers" that > places such professionals in jeopardy. > > This holds true for both performers and organ technicians. When someone > comes along who is willing to do the job for little or nothing, the working > professional is devalued.   Whilst taking your points on board, you are comparing apples to horseshoes. In the UK, the vast majority of small to medium parishes have organists who are either wholly voluntary, or are paid a small honorarium. This is as it always has been. The ordinary parish organists here come from every conceivable walk of life, follow their profession or occupation during the working week, and regard their work at the organ, or with the choir as a service to their church and community.   Alongside this system is the 'circuit' of cathedrals, colleges and 'great' parish churches, where *church music* professionals follow *their* profession.   Your comments regarding the effect that volunteer organists have upon the terms and conditions of paid church musicians is undoubtedly pertinent in the USA where I understand that the *norm* is for church musicians to *be* paid. But you do raise the question of proscribing the charitable contributions that some people wish to make to their church, when their offering is that of music. I expect that in your church society, as in ours here, people contribute their time and talent, whether it be flower arranging, cleaning, carpentry, decorating - or serving as church warden, treasurer, or council secretary. Do you draw a line at people offering their musical talents freely?   Regards, Chris Baker    
(back) Subject: Re: Bach Jewish? From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2000 15:04:45 -0400   Was he appointed to that High Rank by the Pope? Bob ,,,   ----- Original Message ----- From: Stanley E Yoder <syoder+@andrew.cmu.edu> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, July 27, 2000 2:42 PM Subject: Bach Jewish?     > Someone mentioned that he was. First time I heard that. What's the authority? > Stan Yoder > Pittsburgh      
(back) Subject: Re: Concert announcement, Lewisville, TX (cross-posted) From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2000 14:24:38 -0500   The organ is a Galanti Praeludium III - 3 manual, all digital, about 70 pseudo-ranks. (Replaced a Hammond they had had for at least 30 years before that.)   Cremona502@cs.com wrote:   > What a nice programme. You're going to be veddy veddy tired come = Sunday > night! What is the organ? > > Bruce > . . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles > Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com > HOWLING ACRES: http://ourworld.cs.com/Brucon502 > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Today's New York Times x-posted From: "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2000 17:14:18 -0400   In the "Circuits" section. Page G1. Major article:   BEHIND THE MUSIC: ORGANS GO ELECTRONIC   New Technology Is Cutting Costs for Churches, but Causing a Schism Among Musicians   by Anne Eisenberg   The imposing facade of the main pipe organ at the Fifth Avenue = Presbyterian Church in Manhattan looks about the same as it did before its recent overhaul. And its thousands of pipes still produce celestial blasts of trumpets in the treble and rumbling thunder in the bass.   But beyond the facade and the ranks of pipes is a profound change that is causing rumbles not just beneath the floorboards of the sanctuary but also throughout the world where people listen to and treasure the mighty sounds of the pipe organ.   The rason? Some of the sounds in the refurbished main organ are digital, produced by a loudspeaker instead of an organ pipe. That means that when the organist pulls a stop on the console to signal, say, an English horn = or a chime or a flute and then touches the keyboard, the people sitting in = the pews hear a digitally sampled version of a horn, a chime or a flute pipe recorded elsewhere. Stops are the knobs used to activate a row of pipes that make a particular sound, like that of a flute.   While the sound of the main organ at Fifth Avenue Presbyterian has only a few digital contributors salted in among the regulars, the antiphonal division--the main organ accompaniment sitting at the rear of the hall--is now entirely digital. All of its sounds are produced by circuits and loudspeakers instead of pipes.   Fifth Avenue Presbyterian is just one place where the king of instruments = is being usurped by the prince of electronics. In organ lofts throughout the country, relatively inexpensive circuits and loudspeakers are taking the place of costly organ pipes. Sometimes digital sounds are used solely for the deep base notes of the pedal pipes and sometimes for the reeds, = trumpets or other stops that are expensive to build and fussy to maintain. = Sometimes the entire instrument is digital.   Synthesized organ sounds are not new. What is different is the quality of the sounds and the speed with which they are being adopted. Proponents = say that with the increasingly sophisticated sampling techniques of digital technology, there is virtually no difference in sound between a true organ pipe and its digital impersonator. Any differences, they contend, are outweighed by the savings in money and space.   Opponents argue that the sounds of the ersatz organ pipes is sharply inferior. They object to what they see as yet another musical sacrific on the altar of frugality.   [the article goes on at some length, quoting people whose names are known = to all of you; there are seven photographs]   Alan                                        
(back) Subject: Re: Today's New York Times x-posted From: "Dr. Charles E. Brown" <chabrown@impop.bellatlantic.net> Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2000 17:43:16 +0000   No wonder William Whitehead, who served as organist for many years at = Fifth Avenue, died recently. It was out of shock!!!!   I find it absolutely reprehensible!!!! Do we live in a totally artificial society?   Charles   Alan Freed wrote:   > In the "Circuits" section. Page G1. Major article: > > BEHIND THE MUSIC: ORGANS GO ELECTRONIC > > New Technology Is Cutting Costs for Churches, but Causing a Schism Among > Musicians > > by Anne Eisenberg > > The imposing facade of the main pipe organ at the Fifth Avenue = Presbyterian > Church in Manhattan looks about the same as it did before its recent > overhaul. And its thousands of pipes still produce celestial blasts of > trumpets in the treble and rumbling thunder in the bass. > > But beyond the facade and the ranks of pipes is a profound change that = is > causing rumbles not just beneath the floorboards of the sanctuary but = also > throughout the world where people listen to and treasure the mighty = sounds > of the pipe organ. > > The rason? Some of the sounds in the refurbished main organ are = digital, > produced by a loudspeaker instead of an organ pipe. That means that = when > the organist pulls a stop on the console to signal, say, an English horn = or > a chime or a flute and then touches the keyboard, the people sitting in = the > pews hear a digitally sampled version of a horn, a chime or a flute pipe > recorded elsewhere. Stops are the knobs used to activate a row of pipes > that make a particular sound, like that of a flute. > > While the sound of the main organ at Fifth Avenue Presbyterian has only = a > few digital contributors salted in among the regulars, the antiphonal > division--the main organ accompaniment sitting at the rear of the = hall--is > now entirely digital. All of its sounds are produced by circuits and > loudspeakers instead of pipes. > > Fifth Avenue Presbyterian is just one place where the king of = instruments is > being usurped by the prince of electronics. In organ lofts throughout = the > country, relatively inexpensive circuits and loudspeakers are taking the > place of costly organ pipes. Sometimes digital sounds are used solely = for > the deep base notes of the pedal pipes and sometimes for the reeds, = trumpets > or other stops that are expensive to build and fussy to maintain. = Sometimes > the entire instrument is digital. > > Synthesized organ sounds are not new. What is different is the quality = of > the sounds and the speed with which they are being adopted. Proponents = say > that with the increasingly sophisticated sampling techniques of digital > technology, there is virtually no difference in sound between a true = organ > pipe and its digital impersonator. Any differences, they contend, are > outweighed by the savings in money and space. > > Opponents argue that the sounds of the ersatz organ pipes is sharply > inferior. They object to what they see as yet another musical sacrific = on > the altar of frugality. > > [the article goes on at some length, quoting people whose names are = known to > all of you; there are seven photographs] > > Alan > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Today's New York Times x-posted From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2000 16:07:41   At 05:43 PM 7/27/2000 +0000, you wrote: >I find it absolutely reprehensible!!!! Do we live in a totally artificial >society?<snip>   Looks that way. Get used to it; the first decade of the 21st century = looks primed to be the "digitorg" decade, indeed.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Hidden vs Exposed From: <Innkawgneeto@webtv.net> Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2000 23:39:13 -0400 (EDT)   Just because the well known organist on 5th ave goes out for a smoke between songs, doesn't make it standard operating procedure (assuming of course this is true).   If it's the cathedral I'm thinking of, said organist must leave the bench, wait for elevator, ride elevator down, exit building, smoke, enter building, wait for elevator, ride elevator, return to bench. Uh huh, yeah, right.   Neil