PipeChat Digest #1431 - Friday, June 2, 2000
 
North Dakota
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: Perfect Pitch, Tonal pitch
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Perfect Pitch, Tonal pitch
  by "Harvey DeGering" <chd@mcsi.net>
Christian Science solos by McDermid (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Perfect Pitch: Transposing can be learned
  by "Roy Wilson" <royjaneann@hotmail.com>
RE: Perfect Pitch: Transposing can be learned
  by "Bert Atwood" <atwoody@ispchannel.com>
Re: Other Crumhorn notes - followup and an experiment to try
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Suggestions, please . . .
  by "Dr. Darryl Miller" <organdok@safari.net>
Re: Suggestions, please . . .
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
The latest update, 6/1
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
1st Congo - Binghamton, NY (Cross-post)
  by "Douglas A Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com>
Re: The latest update, 6/1
  by "N. Jones" <gedeckt@usit.net>
Re: 1st Congo - Binghamton, NY (Cross-post)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Perfect Pitch: Transposing can be learned
  by "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au>
Re: Other Crumhorn notes - followup and an experiment to try
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Perfect Pitch, Tonal pitch
  by "Ray Ahrens" <ray_ahrens@hotmail.com>
Needing advice
  by "Eric Chaffey" <ericchaffey@home.com>
Music and Color
  by "STRAIGHT" <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net>
 


(back) Subject: North Dakota From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Thu, 1 Jun 2000 09:41:18 -0400   What I have on my extant list for Grand Forks ND, not knowing how extant they are:   United Lutheran -- Casavant Freres Opus 2790, 1964 3M, 49R, tracker Wesley College -- Austin Opus 1606, 2M, 22R University of North Dakota -- tracker organ First Presbyterian -- Aeolian-Skinner extant, last new instrument built by them, Opus 1533, 1971, 3M   Crookston, Minnesota, a short way to the east, had listed: First Congregational, Hook & Hastings 1904, Opus 2041, 2M, 17R Methodist -- Carl Barckhoff tracker, 2M, 9R Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Reuter EP 1990, 2M, 31R, had Tellers 1917 2M, 17R, reb. 1960 EP   Judy Ollikkala  
(back) Subject: Re: Perfect Pitch, Tonal pitch From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Thu, 01 Jun 2000 09:02:54   At 08:01 PM 5/31/2000 PDT, you wrote: >I'm not an expert on >tuning, but many tuners begin with the middle A (440) and tune fifths and =   >fourths from there. As you get out of the middle range, the octaves are = not >perfectly in tune with those middle register notes making it more = difficult >to recognize the pitch as the notes get farther (up or down) from the = middle >register notes.<snip>   Roy inadvertantly brings up an excellent point..."spread" tuning. It's a known fact that even accomplished piano tuners "spread" tune their = charges, even unintentionally. This renders what Roy has described, with octaves slightly "spread out" in tuning as they depart from Middle C. This makes all octaves slightly "wide" Of course, in theory, all octaves are consonant from the bottom to the top of the compass, but in practice, it seldom works out that way.   The "unknown" (by some of the less learned on this list) William Braid White, founder of the School of Piano Technology named after him, wrote an excellent piece of this subject, but was unable to answer as to why it happens. However, the method of tuning he developed uses other than consonant harmonics to double-check tuning accuracy, and, when properly applied assures that tuning "spread" does not occur, and that all octaves will be consonant while intervening steps are also right on the money.   As Roy stated, the pitch standard is set at A` or Middle C, and the tuner then "lays the bearings" in the middle octave by timing beats of fifths = and fourths, thus setting the octave to Equal Temperament (or whatever nasty temperament is requested). It would seem, on the face, that it is then a simple task of beating each lower or higher octave tone to its second harmonic. However, White found, and I've concurred after numerous trials, that the matching of octaves strictly using the second harmonic method, or even the fourth, leaves too much room for error, and the resulting octave interval usually winds up "wide". White suggests using non-consonant intervals, such as the flatted twenty-first, which will beat the seventh harmonic, to check such intervals. By counting the calculated beating of, say, the seventh harmonic of the lower tone with the fundamental of the higher, more perfect octave consonance is then eventually attained, and "spread" tuning is avoided. Of course, this requires a very sensitive and trained ear, and I've found it much harder to apply to the foundation = stops of the organ, whereas the piano is much more rich in seventh harmonic in the lower registers.   There are many that ascribe to "spread" tuning of the piano as being tonally correct, thinking it "makes up" for some of the sins of Equal Temperament. Such is definately not the case, as all it does is make the artificially "wide" intervals of Equal Temperament even wider and more discordant, thus making for some pretty "piquant" fourths in the upper registers, not to mention the problem of untuned octaves.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Perfect Pitch, Tonal pitch From: "Harvey DeGering" <chd@mcsi.net> Date: Thu, 1 Jun 2000 10:04:25 -0700   As a techie type I have wondered about tuning. Yamaha, who seem to be a top name in music these days has, in the manual for the old TX81Z sound module, micro-tuning information. It also has tuning info for: Equal Pure C (major) Pure A (major) Mean Tone C Pythagorian C Werckmeister Kirnberger Vallotti & Young The frequencies are given to three decimal places and also in cents difference between steps. The Hammond organ has a tuning that seems to minimize beats on the 5ths so it must have something other than Equal tuning. Would like to hear comments on the pros and cons, and why these different tunings were developed. Harvey, (The Invisible Rabbit) chd@mcsi.net Sutherlin, OR    
(back) Subject: Christian Science solos by McDermid (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 01 Jun 2000 10:49:21 -0700   They're all out of print; OHS has a recording of them made at the Mother Church; but has anybody reprinted them, and/or can anybody lay their hands on them to copy them? Would love to get my hands on a set.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: Perfect Pitch: Transposing can be learned From: "Roy Wilson" <royjaneann@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 01 Jun 2000 13:42:01 PDT   Bob:   It was all written in total seriousness. None was intended "tongue in cheek". But no one is perfect. My wife and I argue over what key a = record is playing in. Sometimes the turntable is too fast. She hears it sharp; = I sometimes hear it in the original key. (Sometimes knowing the composition =   may predispose me to hear it in the "original" key.)   In my case, because the original pitch I learned was low, I am never sure whether the pitch I am thinking is original, or newly learned. It = sometimes has to do with how early in the morning it is; whether I have played or heard other music, etc. Pitch is too elastic for one to be 100 per cent perfect.   There have been psychological studies on people with pitch sensitivity. They are interesting to read. An individual's acuracy is seldom more than =   70 percent. Also, the more notes that are played, the more one is likely = to hear notes that are not being played, or not hear some in the middle of = the cluster. When I listen to three or more pitches, I have trouble distinguishing the octave harmonics from the basic pitches, especially if the octave harmonic is especially prevalent on a given instrument.   Transposing is not painful, however, at least not to me.   :o)   Roy Wilson St. John's UMCh Lubbock, TX   >From: Bob Elms <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> >Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> >Subject: Re: Perfect Pitch: Transposing can be learned >Date: Thu, 01 Jun 2000 13:07:29 +0800 > >Roy, for one minute you had me in. >Bob E.   ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: RE: Perfect Pitch: Transposing can be learned From: "Bert Atwood" <atwoody@ispchannel.com> Date: Thu, 1 Jun 2000 14:00:00 -0700   The Time/Life Biography on Jazz Cornet great Bix Beiderbecke notes that = he, "could instantly distinguish the sound of a tuning fork designed to sound concert A... from one tuned to 44, and he could call all out every note = when somebody struck a handful of keys on the piano."   > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of > Roy Wilson > Sent: Thursday, June 01, 2000 1:42 PM > To: pipechat@pipechat.org > Subject: Re: Perfect Pitch: Transposing can be learned > > > Bob: > > It was all written in total seriousness. None was intended "tongue in > cheek". But no one is perfect. My wife and I argue over what > key a record > is playing in. Sometimes the turntable is too fast. She hears > it sharp; I > sometimes hear it in the original key. (Sometimes knowing the > composition > may predispose me to hear it in the "original" key.) > > In my case, because the original pitch I learned was low, I am never = sure > whether the pitch I am thinking is original, or newly learned. > It sometimes > has to do with how early in the morning it is; whether I have played or > heard other music, etc. Pitch is too elastic for one to be 100 per cent > perfect. > > There have been psychological studies on people with pitch sensitivity. > They are interesting to read. An individual's acuracy is seldom > more than > 70 percent. Also, the more notes that are played, the more one > is likely to > hear notes that are not being played, or not hear some in the > middle of the > cluster. When I listen to three or more pitches, I have trouble > distinguishing the octave harmonics from the basic pitches, especially = if > the octave harmonic is especially prevalent on a given instrument. > > Transposing is not painful, however, at least not to me. > > :o) > > Roy Wilson > St. John's UMCh > Lubbock, TX > > >From: Bob Elms <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> > >Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > >To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > >Subject: Re: Perfect Pitch: Transposing can be learned > >Date: Thu, 01 Jun 2000 13:07:29 +0800 > > > >Roy, for one minute you had me in. > >Bob E. > > ________________________________________________________________________ > Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Other Crumhorn notes - followup and an experiment to try From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Thu, 1 Jun 2000 18:22:56 EDT   In a message dated 00-05-29 19:21:25 EDT, you write:   << You need to do some studying. Any experienced tuner will tell you it's = the flues that change seasonally...NOT the reeds. All tuners "fudge" the = reeds to match the changing flues, thus giving the reeds a bum rap. >> Desert bob wrote the above, which I don't dispute, (in fact I think that = is what I said using different words)... MY point was that reed stops are = MORE stable when properly tuned and LESS temperature sensitive >>compared to = flue stops<< which change more rapidly with temperature changes. As for my tuning, I don't "fudge" anything. I won't tune the organ if the = temperatures are not at the sunday morning temperature or VERY close (typically about = 70 degrees F.) because I don't believe in seasonally re-pitching the entire organ. nor do I believe in pulling the pitch of a reed rank too far so the =   regulation does not get messed up. The perception that the "reeds are out-of-tune" is perpetuated because all of the flue pipework tends to move = up and down at about the same rate of change (or moves 'together') and is in relative tune within the flue ranks but the reed stops tend not to change = as much give a change in temperature.   As proof take a tuning reference box (like a Peterson 300 or 320) which = has a vernier with cent calibration. Pick a pitch of a 2' C principal (tenor C = on the 4' octave, Middle C on a 8' Principal or viola) and zero the pitch(adjusting the vernier for a zero beat, and check with the tuner at = the next octave higher with no audible beat) on that pipe. write down the = reading on the vernier (in plus or minus cents) and then pitch a similar pitch in = the (Swell) trumpet 8'. (be sure to write down the pitch variation in plus or minus cents for the reed also, it may or may not be different from the principal depending on when the organ was last tuned) then go set the = heat for a 5 degree temperature change and wait about 30 - 45 minutes. Go back =   and check the Principal refernce and you will see that it has changed = about 10 to 12 cents. The reed stop reference pitch then should be checked. you will see that the pitch variation on the reed will not be as far changed = as the flue pipe (principal). case closed.   Rick M  
(back) Subject: Suggestions, please . . . From: "Dr. Darryl Miller" <organdok@safari.net> Date: Thu, 01 Jun 2000 18:27:54 -0400   Hi, Y'all!   A non-list member friend e-mailed me today and asked the following = question: "If you were to commission an anthem, hymn arrangement, or psalm setting for organ/brass/choir (possibly including treble choir), who would you = ask?"   I answered his question with a off-the-top-of-my-head answer, but I think the collective brains of the List(s) would be good to see. My answers were different for anthems, hymn arrangement and psalm setting. I also = suggested a hymn introduction, bridge/modulation, and free accompaniment setting, = too.   What say ye?   Yours,     Darryl by the Sea    
(back) Subject: Re: Suggestions, please . . . From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 01 Jun 2000 15:52:14 -0700   Gerre Hancock McNeal Robinson David Willcocks Gerald Near David Hurd   Cheers,   Bud     "Dr. Darryl Miller" wrote:   > Hi, Y'all! > > A non-list member friend e-mailed me today and asked the following = question: > "If you were to commission an anthem, hymn arrangement, or psalm setting > for organ/brass/choir (possibly including treble choir), who would you = ask?" > > I answered his question with a off-the-top-of-my-head answer, but I = think > the collective brains of the List(s) would be good to see. My answers = were > different for anthems, hymn arrangement and psalm setting. I also = suggested > a hymn introduction, bridge/modulation, and free accompaniment setting, = too. > > What say ye? > > Yours, > > Darryl by the Sea > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: The latest update, 6/1 From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Thu, 1 Jun 2000 19:02:38 EDT   Dear friends,   This has been a trying time for me. As you know, I had a lumpectomy on = 5/1, and needed to go for additional surgery on 5/18 to "mop up" some cancer cells. By the grace of God, a piece of an undiscovered malignancy was scooped up with the remainder of the original tumor.   I am home now, recovering from a modified radical mastectomy on 5/30. All =   indicators are good in that the cancer appears to have been removed this time. Having 3 major surgeries in one month was tough, though, and I'm dealing with a severe energy shortage. I was able to play for part of the =   service last week, but I'm pretty sure that this week is going to be out. = I am extremely fortunate in that my ex-mother in law and I have a close relationship, and she is willing to sub for me as needed.   I am also fortunate in the strong support I am getting from my friends, my =   community, and my church. I have received so many cards and emails! It makes it easier to keep going, knowing that you all care.   I now have a couple of weeks off from treatments, with only some plastic surgery preparation and checkups scheduled before I start chemotherapy. = It's going to a long, exhausting summer, but "I'll get by with a little help = from my friends."   On a brighter note, my daughter Laura is graduation from high school on = 6/9, with honors!! I am very proud of her.   Thanks again, Vicki Ceruti Organist, Center Moriches UMC Long Island, NY  
(back) Subject: 1st Congo - Binghamton, NY (Cross-post) From: "Douglas A Campbell" <dougcampbell@juno.com> Date: Thu, 1 Jun 2000 19:42:57 -0400   Listers,   You might be interested in the Service list for the First Congregational Church, Binghamton, NY. (Hint: Read Carefully)   First Congregational Church Binghamton, NY May 28, 2000   Prelude: A Fantasy Harold E. Darke, 1888-1973 Hymn: "Joyful, Joyful, We Adore THee" Hymn To Joy Worship in Song: "For the Beauty of the Earth" (Barbara Hromek, soprano) Hymn of Reflection: "What Wonderous Love Is This" Mercer's Cluster, 1836 Offertory: "Andantino" (Pieces of Fantasie) Louis Vierne, 1870-1937 Doxology Old Hundredth Hymn of Dedication: I Sing a Song of the Saints of God" Grande Isle Postlude: "Fantasia in G" S.572 Johan Sebastian Bach, 1685-1750   {Listed in the back of the Bulletin is the staff including: M. Searle Wright Minister of Music           Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY  
(back) Subject: Re: The latest update, 6/1 From: "N. Jones" <gedeckt@usit.net> Date: Thu, 01 Jun 2000 20:02:58 -0400   An ex-mother-in-law that will substitute? That's great!   You are in the prayers and thoughts of many people.   Noel Jones       ---------- >From: Myosotis51@aol.com >To: Piano-L@uamont.edu, pipechat@pipechat.org >Subject: The latest update, 6/1 >Date: Thu, Jun 1, 2000, 7:02 PM >   > Dear friends, > > This has been a trying time for me. As you know, I had a lumpectomy on = 5/1, > and needed to go for additional surgery on 5/18 to "mop up" some cancer > cells. By the grace of God, a piece of an undiscovered malignancy was > scooped up with the remainder of the original tumor. > > I am home now, recovering from a modified radical mastectomy on 5/30. = All > indicators are good in that the cancer appears to have been removed = this > time. Having 3 major surgeries in one month was tough, though, and I'm > dealing with a severe energy shortage. I was able to play for part of = the > service last week, but I'm pretty sure that this week is going to be = out. I > am extremely fortunate in that my ex-mother in law and I have a close > relationship, and she is willing to sub for me as needed. > > I am also fortunate in the strong support I am getting from my friends, = my > community, and my church. I have received so many cards and emails! It > makes it easier to keep going, knowing that you all care. > > I now have a couple of weeks off from treatments, with only some plastic > surgery preparation and checkups scheduled before I start chemotherapy. = It's > going to a long, exhausting summer, but "I'll get by with a little help = from > my friends." > > On a brighter note, my daughter Laura is graduation from high school on = 6/9, > with honors!! I am very proud of her. > > Thanks again, > Vicki Ceruti > Organist, Center Moriches UMC > Long Island, NY > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >  
(back) Subject: Re: 1st Congo - Binghamton, NY (Cross-post) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Thu, 01 Jun 2000 17:13:34 -0700   Wow! I didn't know Searle Wright was still ALIVE!   Cheers,   Bud     Douglas A Campbell wrote:   > Listers, > > You might be interested in the Service list for the First Congregational > Church, Binghamton, NY. > (Hint: Read Carefully) > > First Congregational Church > Binghamton, NY > May 28, 2000 > > Prelude: A Fantasy Harold E. Darke, 1888-1973 > Hymn: "Joyful, Joyful, We Adore THee" Hymn To Joy > Worship in Song: "For the Beauty of the Earth" (Barbara Hromek, = soprano) > Hymn of Reflection: "What Wonderous Love Is This" Mercer's Cluster, > 1836 > Offertory: "Andantino" (Pieces of Fantasie) Louis Vierne, 1870-1937 > Doxology Old Hundredth > Hymn of Dedication: I Sing a Song of the Saints of God" Grande Isle > Postlude: "Fantasia in G" S.572 Johan Sebastian Bach, 1685-1750 > > {Listed in the back of the Bulletin is the staff including: > M. Searle Wright Minister of Music > > Douglas A. Campbell > Skaneateles, NY > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Perfect Pitch: Transposing can be learned From: "Bob Elms" <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> Date: Fri, 02 Jun 2000 08:42:20 +0800   OK Roy. I have never heard of anyone as sensitive to pitch as that. I knew = an organ apprentice of a friend of mine who could tell you what note was = being played, if you picked up a pipe in the workshop and blew it, but there was = no way of telling whether that pipe was spot on or whether it was sharp or = flat. I would doubt whether a few cents either way would affect the result. Regards, Bob Elms.       Roy Wilson wrote:   > Bob: > > It was all written in total seriousness. None was intended "tongue in > cheek". But no one is perfect. My wife and I argue over what key a = record > is playing in. Sometimes the turntable is too fast. She hears it = sharp; I > sometimes hear it in the original key. (Sometimes knowing the = composition > may predispose me to hear it in the "original" key.) > > In my case, because the original pitch I learned was low, I am never = sure > whether the pitch I am thinking is original, or newly learned. It = sometimes > has to do with how early in the morning it is; whether I have played or > heard other music, etc. Pitch is too elastic for one to be 100 per cent > perfect. > > There have been psychological studies on people with pitch sensitivity. > They are interesting to read. An individual's acuracy is seldom more = than > 70 percent. Also, the more notes that are played, the more one is = likely to > hear notes that are not being played, or not hear some in the middle of = the > cluster. When I listen to three or more pitches, I have trouble > distinguishing the octave harmonics from the basic pitches, especially = if > the octave harmonic is especially prevalent on a given instrument. > > Transposing is not painful, however, at least not to me. > > :o) > > Roy Wilson > St. John's UMCh > Lubbock, TX > > >From: Bob Elms <elmsr@albanyis.com.au> > >Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > >To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > >Subject: Re: Perfect Pitch: Transposing can be learned > >Date: Thu, 01 Jun 2000 13:07:29 +0800 > > > >Roy, for one minute you had me in. > >Bob E. > > ________________________________________________________________________ > Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org   -- ----------------------------------------------------- Click here for Free Video!! http://www.gohip.com/freevideo/      
(back) Subject: Re: Other Crumhorn notes - followup and an experiment to try From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Thu, 01 Jun 2000 18:20:39   At 06:22 PM 6/1/2000 EDT, you wrote: >I don't "fudge" anything. I won't tune the organ if the temperatures=20 >are not at the sunday morning temperature or VERY close (typically about 70= =20 >degrees F.) because I don't believe in seasonally re-pitching the entire=20 >organ.<snip>   Bonus points for considering long-term building temperature! Many tuners and techs don't (or just can't, due to distances travelled and hours the organ is available), and the results are less than satisfactory.   >...nor do I believe in pulling the pitch of a reed rank too far so the=20 >regulation does not get messed up.<snip>   Boy, does THIS get to be a problem sometimes! M=F6ller was really bad about initial set-up in its later years, and sometimes would finish (if they finished ANYTHING...at ALL) the reeds whenever the time suited them, not whenever the building was right for tuning! First time someone goes in to "touch up" the rank, reeds fly off, sound bad, or both, or more.   <schnipping the rest, excellent as it is...>   Thanks, Rick! Excellent demonstrative post.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Perfect Pitch, Tonal pitch From: "Ray Ahrens" <ray_ahrens@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 01 Jun 2000 22:07:18 CDT   >The "unknown" (by some of the less learned on this list) William Braid >White, founder of the School of Piano Technology named after him, wrote = an >excellent piece of this subject, but was unable to answer as to why it >happens. However, the method of tuning he developed uses other than >consonant harmonics to double-check tuning accuracy, and, when properly >applied assures that tuning "spread" does not occur, and that all octaves   Perhaps there is a reason he remains unknown. I prefer to use Owen Jorgensen's "Tuning: The Perfection of 18th century Temperament-The lost Art of 19th century Temperament and The Science of Equal Temperament. Complete with instructions for aural and electronic tuning." Michigan = State University Press, East Lansing 1991. He describes the how to and the history of a variety of meantone, modified meantone, well, and quasi-equal =   temperaments. In the section on Inharmonicity _he_ explains why tuners don't necessarily tune pure octaves, something to do with how a piano is strung.   This book is 798 pages big, filled with charts and data, and has an extensive bibliography listed sources from as far back as 1485.   Seems to be a rather well-known book too, no?   ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Needing advice From: "Eric Chaffey" <ericchaffey@home.com> Date: Thu, 01 Jun 2000 21:20:11 -0700   Hi,   I just subscribed to this list today and I am hoping someone will be able to give me a little advice. A friend of mine at the church I play for offered me their partially completed Schober organ. It was apparently a "do it yourself kit" for an electronic organ. Unfortunately, the company went out of business before they could order the stops and I am not sure how complete the instrument is in other respects. I am not an expert in electronics and the instruction manual had me baffled on page 1. What I am wondering is if anyone knows of another company that makes parts that could work for this and how expensive would it be to get it working. I would really make use of this organ if at all possible.   Sincerely,     Eric Chaffey  
(back) Subject: Music and Color From: "STRAIGHT" <STRAIGHT@infoblvd.net> Date: Fri, 2 Jun 2000 00:47:40 -0400   There's the most interesting thread of discussion on another list, a chat list of fiber people who spin, weave, raise sheep and so on, it seems = a fair number of them sense music as color, and in fact cross-sense a whole lot of things. They taste and smell colors, see music, and so on. In = fact there's a term for it ----synesthesia.   I have also noticed that most of them also talk about having migraine headaches. And a lot of them are very sensitive or allergic to a lot of common smells, like soap, shampoo, perfume, all that stuff in the = "cleaning" aisle in the grocery store.   Some of the most famous composers apparently had this ability also. Not me. I hear music, smell scents, and see colors -----all = separately. And I guess I like it that way. I bet overstimulation can set off a migraine nicely.   Diane S.