PipeChat Digest #1444 - Friday, June 9, 2000
 
Re: New list member, looking for opinions
  by "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu>
Re: Cathedral of Our Lady of Angels, Los Angeles	-Dobson/Rosalesorgan
  by "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: Youth Choir Concert Report (xpost)
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
It's IRC time tonight.
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca>
RE: swamped Skinner
  by "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu>
The Allen at Bellevue Baptist, Memphis
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
RE: New list member, looking for opinions
  by "Bert Atwood" <atwoody@ispchannel.com>
reed organs
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Fw: reed organs
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Fw: reed organs
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Britson Kit
  by "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu>
Re: Fw: reed organs
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: New list member, looking for opinions
  by "Ray Ahrens" <ray_ahrens@hotmail.com>
Re: Britson Kit
  by "Paul Soulek" <soulek@frontiernet.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: New list member, looking for opinions From: "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu> Date: Fri, 9 Jun 2000 07:36:34 -0400     ----- Original Message ----- From: Rick Sweeney <rts@magrathea.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org>; <organchat@egroups.com> Sent: Friday, June 09, 2000 12:21 AM Subject: New list member, looking for opinions   > We also hosted a visit from Barbara > Owen, who offered advice and recommendations. > > What we are doing presently is inviting a few local organ builders to = come > in an offer estimates on restoring the present organ to working order, which > includes re-leathering and replacing the console. We're sure that this cost > will most likely approach the cost of replacing the instrument. We're also > interested to hear if any of the builders think this instrument is worth > preserving or restoring to it's original sound.   What? Worth preserving? A Skinner -wouldn't- be worth preserving? Just out of cuiosity, what did Barbara say about that?   What local builders are doing estimates? I would assume Fisk since they're right in your neck of the woods, Andover maybe. (If Fisk, look for a guy named Mark Nelson. Great guy, I've known him for a LONG time, though I haven't seen him in about equally as long.)   -Rebekah    
(back) Subject: Re: Cathedral of Our Lady of Angels, Los Angeles -Dobson/Rosalesorgan From: "Alan Freed" <afreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 09 Jun 2000 08:49:02 -0400   El Pueblo de Nuestra Se=F1ora de los Angeles de Porciuncula, I seem to recall= .. But don't bet on it.   Alan   > From: quilisma@socal.rr.com > Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Thu, 08 Jun 2000 12:31:50 -0700 > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: Re: Cathedral of Our Lady of Angels, Los Angeles -Dobson/Rosales= organ >=20 > "The Pueblo of Our Lady of the Angels of the Portic" ... > whatever that word is .. I can't spell it ... as it should have been all > along. "Porti-what's-it's" is a Franciscan devotion to Our Lady, in any > case.    
(back) Subject: RE: Youth Choir Concert Report (xpost) From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Fri, 9 Jun 2000 08:25:56 -0500   Neil:   Thanks for sharing this information. I have heard about this group but = have not yet gone "up the road" to hear them; now I'll plan to do so for sure. The Halelujan piece is an Oklahoma standard; we do it twice a year at St. Paul's in OKC.   Cheers,   Peter   -----Original Message----- From: Innkawgneeto@webtv.net [mailto:Innkawgneeto@webtv.net] Sent: Thursday, June 08, 2000 10:44 PM To: anglican-music@dragon.com; pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Youth Choir Concert Report (xpost)     Friends:   We were privileged to host the Chapel Choir of the Boston Avenue United Meth Church (Tulsa, Oklahoma) on Wednesday (6/7/00).  
(back) Subject: It's IRC time tonight. From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Date: Fri, 9 Jun 2000 09:49:06 -0400   I hope that more and more of our PipeChat-L members will join us this evening for our bi-weekly Internet Relay Chat, (IRC). For help in how to get on go to the PipeChat-L web page at:   http://www.pipechat.org/   Where you will find instructions on how to log on. It isn't complicated, and it is free!   As an added bonus those of us who have Real Audio installed in our computers, can listen to a live radio programme from Perth, Australia, 'Theatre Organ Time", hosted by Lesley Robinson and Gary Duggan, broadcast from RTRFM on 92.1. We wouldn't be able to hear this programme using = normal radio, but with Real Audio we are able to hear some of the finest Theatre Organs and superb performers plying them.   For more details about RTRFM, go to their Web page at:   http://www.global.net.au/~duo/   and listen in whilst you are chatting on PipeChat IRC.   For us in the Eastern Time Zone we hear the programme at 10.00 PM, but Lesley and Gary are actually putting it out on the air at 10.00 am = Saturday morning, Australian (Perth) Time!   Try it, you'll like it!   See you tonight,   Bob Conway.    
(back) Subject: RE: swamped Skinner From: "Storandt, Peter" <pstorandt@okcu.edu> Date: Fri, 9 Jun 2000 08:55:31 -0500   I agree with Bud completely. I grew up on a 1926 E.M. Skinner in Ithaca, NY, in the same sort of front chamber you describe. When my home Lutheran church opted for a new Gress-Miles for rear gallery installation in the '70's, the Skinner languished for a time in silence and was eventually = moved to a new Lutheran church in Bellingham, Washington. With the help of list member Culley Mowers, I was able to find and visit it there last fall. = Its (not it's) new home is a wide chancel wall installation, whence it sings wonderfully into the room and is much loved by its congregation. I hope = our new member's story will end as happily. It is absolutely worth pursuing a solution that preserves the Skinner components you have and perhaps = couples them with available and compatible resources.   Peter   -----Original Message----- From: quilisma@socal.rr.com [mailto:quilisma@socal.rr.com] Sent: Friday, June 09, 2000 12:05 AM To: PipeChat Subject: swamped Skinner     Barbara Owen is the best. Period. Trust her.   Talk to A. Thompson-Allen and Co. in New Haven ... they're the best as far as Skinner restorations.   Check with Alan Laufman at Organ Clearing House ... you can probably get a Skinner console AND Skinner ranks approaching the original scales.   It IS possible to reconstruct an organ that's been vandalized as much as yours has.    
(back) Subject: The Allen at Bellevue Baptist, Memphis From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Fri, 9 Jun 2000 11:28:40 EDT   In the recent threads describing the monstrous and magnificent new Allen Renaissance organ at Bellevue Baptist in Memphis, Tennessee, I wanted to = add (since no one has previously stated yet) that the tonal specifications = were drawn up and designed by Tom Hazleton. Read the spec and it has Tom = written all over it in many ways: A) liturgical B) gospel C) symphonic/orchestral D) theatre Interestingly, I sang in the choir at Bellevue on occasion in the 70s and 80's when they were still downtown and under the direction of Dr. Thomas Lane. Then they were on a wonderful 78 rank Moller of four manuals. Betty =   Lunati Grise, a Craighead student, was the senior organist and Larry Luton =   was the assistant organist and the uncle of one of my best friends. So, = in addition to singing on occasion I also got to play the organ. They did excellent music back then and still do from what I hear. But I just = wanted to give credit where credit is due- Tom outdid himself on this one.   Scott F. Foppiano, Director of Music and Liturgical Coordination National Shrine of the Little Flower, Royal Oak, MI  
(back) Subject: RE: New list member, looking for opinions From: "Bert Atwood" <atwoody@ispchannel.com> Date: Fri, 9 Jun 2000 08:35:05 -0700   > > I'm new to this list, and so far have enjoyed your postings. > I don't know just how new to the list you are. If you are very new, you might be interested to know that there was extensive discussion on the merits or lack thereof of tracker, electro-pneumatic (EP), and digitals on PIPEORG-L just within the past few months which you can access in the archives. Good luck with your project! Bert    
(back) Subject: reed organs From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 09 Jun 2000 10:46:36 -0700   I said "most", not all (grin).   I have played a one-manual "Liszt" model Mason & Hamlin with the "Bass = Sustain" coupler (that's probably not what they called it on the stop-knob, but = that's what it did), and it was indeed a very robust sound ... it was the "choir = organ" in a Jesuit church in Cincinnati seating upwards of 1000 (!).   I've never seen one with the French numbers on the stop-knobs, though ... = this one had ordinary reed-organ stop names, and I THOUGHT I remembered the stops = dividing at "f", as "most" Esteys do.   There WAS a three-manual Mason & Hamlin advertised awhile back by one of = the reed organ concerns in New England, but it wasn't (I think) the model you = perhaps have in mind ... it was foot-pumped, and didn't have a pedal-board.   Then there's that tantalizing picture in one of the Estey catalog reprints = of a FULL three-manual and pedal with a magnificent pipe-top.   I've played a couple of two-manual and pedal M & Hs (Sacred Heart, Oberlin = OH; St. Stephen's Episcopal, Mt. Healthy [Cincinnati] ) but in both cases they'd = been neutered by some silly person removing the RESERVOIR to make room for a = blower in the console. Result: you couldn't play more than two or three stops = without them gasping for wind. So I don't really know what the larger ones sound like.   Now, as to your statement about US reed organs being essentially the = American version of French harmoniums: isn't the main (and very significant) = difference that "most" American reed organs are suction (the bellows EXHAUST the air = in the reservoir, creating a vacuum; when a key is played, the air is SUCKED = through the reed from the outside) while European harmoniums operate on positive = pressure?   Yes, I know, the Vocalions in this country are an exception, and to me = there's a SIGNIFICANT difference in the projection of the tone. I don't have any = evidence, but I would think that sucking the sound of the reeds INTO the reservoir = would result in a less fuller tone than blowing them outward like a pipe organ. = OTOH, it is said that suction organs have a "sweeter" sound, possibly BECAUSE a = significant amount of the "snarl" of the reeds IS sucked into the reservoir, and/or = mixes there.   Vocalions make good practice instruments ... unlike most of the Esteys, = the reed boxes aren't directly under the keyboards, so you don't bang your knees = (grin) ... they're up and behind the music rack, and the pallets are connected to the = keys by a normal tracker action, which gives them the FEEL of a normal tracker = organ.   I STILL think there's a place for the reed organ today ... they have their = own literature; they play FOREVER; I know a few small churches that are quite = happy with two manual Esteys, and refuse to be seduced by the local digital = salesperson, with his offer of 70 "ranks" in churches seating 100 people (!). I would = love to see someone take the concept of the Estey electro-pneumatic model and = develop it into a cost-effective alternative to small digital organs.   Cheers,   Bud   TommyLee Whitlock wrote:   > > The pieces don't work on American reed organs, because most of them > > divide at tenor f. The French harmonium was/is quite a sophisticated > > instrument ... vide the pieces for it by Tournemire and Langlais ... > > evidently the action wasn't as "squishy", or the speech as slow as an > > American suction reed organ, if one judges by some of the Tournemire > > movements. > > Sorry Bud, but I beg to differ here. It's true that a lot of US reed = organs > divide at f but it depends on the manufacturer. I own a Mason & Hamlin = reed > organ (reed organs being essentially the US version of European = harmoniums) > which divides at C. It also includes the numbers that you mention on = the > stops along with the stop names. Later models included the rank foot = number, > which made for some fairly busy stop knobs labels. > > M&H also created a high-end line in honor of and named after Liszt = which were > very robust, and still are when you can find them. I have a friend who = has a > 2 manual w/ pedalboard model that will blow your socks off and offers a nice > variety of tones. There were also some with 3 manuals & pedals made and = would > I love to get my hands on one of those! > > Cheers, > TommyLee > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Fw: reed organs From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Fri, 9 Jun 2000 14:57:07 -0500   Having restored many parlour organs and some Euro-organs, one I found very interesting was a Schoniger I did once: Two octaves of saucer bells with a piano-type action...and a knee-operated swell shade at the very top of the gallery.   As per reeds sounding different on negative pressure vs. positive = pressure: On the street organ I'm building at home, I'm using 2 full octaves of 8' reeds with wood resonators. Air pressure makes a nice horn sound, tho not loudly "trumpety".   The American reed organ *does* indeed have a place in the organ realm: = There are some country churches here in the Indiana cornfields that love their instruments. No Allens in *these* churches! -except for one Wicks I put = in.   Rick     ----- Original Message ----- From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, June 09, 2000 12:46 PM Subject: reed organs     > I said "most", not all (grin). > > I have played a one-manual "Liszt" model Mason & Hamlin with the "Bass Sustain" > coupler (that's probably not what they called it on the stop-knob, but that's what > it did), and it was indeed a very robust sound ... it was the "choir organ" in a > Jesuit church in Cincinnati seating upwards of 1000 (!). > > I've never seen one with the French numbers on the stop-knobs, though = ... this one > had ordinary reed-organ stop names, and I THOUGHT I remembered the stops dividing > at "f", as "most" Esteys do. > > There WAS a three-manual Mason & Hamlin advertised awhile back by one of the reed > organ concerns in New England, but it wasn't (I think) the model you perhaps have > in mind ... it was foot-pumped, and didn't have a pedal-board. > > Then there's that tantalizing picture in one of the Estey catalog = reprints of a > FULL three-manual and pedal with a magnificent pipe-top. > > I've played a couple of two-manual and pedal M & Hs (Sacred Heart, = Oberlin OH; St. > Stephen's Episcopal, Mt. Healthy [Cincinnati] ) but in both cases they'd been > neutered by some silly person removing the RESERVOIR to make room for a blower in > the console. Result: you couldn't play more than two or three stops without them > gasping for wind. So I don't really know what the larger ones sound = like. > > Now, as to your statement about US reed organs being essentially the American > version of French harmoniums: isn't the main (and very significant) difference > that "most" American reed organs are suction (the bellows EXHAUST the = air in the > reservoir, creating a vacuum; when a key is played, the air is SUCKED through the > reed from the outside) while European harmoniums operate on positive pressure? > > Yes, I know, the Vocalions in this country are an exception, and to me there's a > SIGNIFICANT difference in the projection of the tone. I don't have any evidence, > but I would think that sucking the sound of the reeds INTO the reservoir would > result in a less fuller tone than blowing them outward like a pipe = organ. OTOH, it > is said that suction organs have a "sweeter" sound, possibly BECAUSE a significant > amount of the "snarl" of the reeds IS sucked into the reservoir, and/or mixes > there. > > Vocalions make good practice instruments ... unlike most of the Esteys, the reed > boxes aren't directly under the keyboards, so you don't bang your knees (grin) ... > they're up and behind the music rack, and the pallets are connected to = the keys by > a normal tracker action, which gives them the FEEL of a normal tracker organ. > > I STILL think there's a place for the reed organ today ... they have = their own > literature; they play FOREVER; I know a few small churches that are = quite happy > with two manual Esteys, and refuse to be seduced by the local digital salesperson, > with his offer of 70 "ranks" in churches seating 100 people (!). I would love to > see someone take the concept of the Estey electro-pneumatic model and develop it > into a cost-effective alternative to small digital organs. > > Cheers, > > Bud > > TommyLee Whitlock wrote: > > > > The pieces don't work on American reed organs, because most of them > > > divide at tenor f. The French harmonium was/is quite a sophisticated > > > instrument ... vide the pieces for it by Tournemire and Langlais ... > > > evidently the action wasn't as "squishy", or the speech as slow as = an > > > American suction reed organ, if one judges by some of the Tournemire > > > movements. > > > > Sorry Bud, but I beg to differ here. It's true that a lot of US reed organs > > divide at f but it depends on the manufacturer. I own a Mason & = Hamlin reed > > organ (reed organs being essentially the US version of European harmoniums) > > which divides at C. It also includes the numbers that you mention on the > > stops along with the stop names. Later models included the rank foot number, > > which made for some fairly busy stop knobs labels. > > > > M&H also created a high-end line in honor of and named after Liszt which were > > very robust, and still are when you can find them. I have a friend = who has a > > 2 manual w/ pedalboard model that will blow your socks off and offers = a nice > > variety of tones. There were also some with 3 manuals & pedals made = and would > > I love to get my hands on one of those! > > > > Cheers, > > TommyLee > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: reed organs From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Fri, 09 Jun 2000 13:09:03 -0700   Question: are two-manual and pedal French harmoniums still being made?   Cheers,   Bud   VEAGUE wrote:   > Having restored many parlour organs and some Euro-organs, one I found = very > interesting was a Schoniger I did once: Two octaves of saucer bells with = a > piano-type action...and a knee-operated swell shade at the very top of = the > gallery. > > As per reeds sounding different on negative pressure vs. positive = pressure: > On the street organ I'm building at home, I'm using 2 full octaves of 8' > reeds with wood resonators. Air pressure makes a nice horn sound, tho = not > loudly "trumpety". > > The American reed organ *does* indeed have a place in the organ realm: = There > are some country churches here in the Indiana cornfields that love their > instruments. No Allens in *these* churches! -except for one Wicks I put = in. > > Rick > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Friday, June 09, 2000 12:46 PM > Subject: reed organs > > > I said "most", not all (grin). > > > > I have played a one-manual "Liszt" model Mason & Hamlin with the "Bass > Sustain" > > coupler (that's probably not what they called it on the stop-knob, but > that's what > > it did), and it was indeed a very robust sound ... it was the "choir > organ" in a > > Jesuit church in Cincinnati seating upwards of 1000 (!). > > > > I've never seen one with the French numbers on the stop-knobs, though = ... > this one > > had ordinary reed-organ stop names, and I THOUGHT I remembered the = stops > dividing > > at "f", as "most" Esteys do. > > > > There WAS a three-manual Mason & Hamlin advertised awhile back by one = of > the reed > > organ concerns in New England, but it wasn't (I think) the model you > perhaps have > > in mind ... it was foot-pumped, and didn't have a pedal-board. > > > > Then there's that tantalizing picture in one of the Estey catalog = reprints > of a > > FULL three-manual and pedal with a magnificent pipe-top. > > > > I've played a couple of two-manual and pedal M & Hs (Sacred Heart, = Oberlin > OH; St. > > Stephen's Episcopal, Mt. Healthy [Cincinnati] ) but in both cases = they'd > been > > neutered by some silly person removing the RESERVOIR to make room for = a > blower in > > the console. Result: you couldn't play more than two or three stops > without them > > gasping for wind. So I don't really know what the larger ones sound = like. > > > > Now, as to your statement about US reed organs being essentially the > American > > version of French harmoniums: isn't the main (and very significant) > difference > > that "most" American reed organs are suction (the bellows EXHAUST the = air > in the > > reservoir, creating a vacuum; when a key is played, the air is SUCKED > through the > > reed from the outside) while European harmoniums operate on positive > pressure? > > > > Yes, I know, the Vocalions in this country are an exception, and to me > there's a > > SIGNIFICANT difference in the projection of the tone. I don't have any > evidence, > > but I would think that sucking the sound of the reeds INTO the = reservoir > would > > result in a less fuller tone than blowing them outward like a pipe = organ. > OTOH, it > > is said that suction organs have a "sweeter" sound, possibly BECAUSE a > significant > > amount of the "snarl" of the reeds IS sucked into the reservoir, = and/or > mixes > > there. > > > > Vocalions make good practice instruments ... unlike most of the = Esteys, > the reed > > boxes aren't directly under the keyboards, so you don't bang your = knees > (grin) ... > > they're up and behind the music rack, and the pallets are connected to = the > keys by > > a normal tracker action, which gives them the FEEL of a normal tracker > organ. > > > > I STILL think there's a place for the reed organ today ... they have = their > own > > literature; they play FOREVER; I know a few small churches that are = quite > happy > > with two manual Esteys, and refuse to be seduced by the local digital > salesperson, > > with his offer of 70 "ranks" in churches seating 100 people (!). I = would > love to > > see someone take the concept of the Estey electro-pneumatic model and > develop it > > into a cost-effective alternative to small digital organs. > > > > Cheers, > > > > Bud > > > > TommyLee Whitlock wrote: > > > > > > The pieces don't work on American reed organs, because most of = them > > > > divide at tenor f. The French harmonium was/is quite a = sophisticated > > > > instrument ... vide the pieces for it by Tournemire and Langlais = ... > > > > evidently the action wasn't as "squishy", or the speech as slow as = an > > > > American suction reed organ, if one judges by some of the = Tournemire > > > > movements. > > > > > > Sorry Bud, but I beg to differ here. It's true that a lot of US = reed > organs > > > divide at f but it depends on the manufacturer. I own a Mason & = Hamlin > reed > > > organ (reed organs being essentially the US version of European > harmoniums) > > > which divides at C. It also includes the numbers that you mention = on > the > > > stops along with the stop names. Later models included the rank = foot > number, > > > which made for some fairly busy stop knobs labels. > > > > > > M&H also created a high-end line in honor of and named after Liszt > which were > > > very robust, and still are when you can find them. I have a friend = who > has a > > > 2 manual w/ pedalboard model that will blow your socks off and = offers a > nice > > > variety of tones. There were also some with 3 manuals & pedals made = and > would > > > I love to get my hands on one of those! > > > > > > Cheers, > > > TommyLee > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related = topics > > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Britson Kit From: "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@syr.edu> Date: Fri, 9 Jun 2000 16:14:34 -0400   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_001D_01BFD22D.CD5DC8A0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Hi everyone,=3D20   Does anyone here have any experience working with or installing the =3D Britson kit? I've heard of it, but don't know if it actually exists. =3D From what I can gather, it can be installed into an electronic console =3D to repair it. How exactly does it work? Sounds like something out of =3D Star Trek to me.   Curious-er and curious-er.=3D20   -Rebekah   ------=3D_NextPart_000_001D_01BFD22D.CD5DC8A0 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META content=3D3D"text/html; charset=3D3Diso-8859-1" =3D http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.00.2314.1000" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ddffff> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>Hi everyone, </FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>Does anyone here have any experience working with or = =3D   installing the Britson kit? I've heard of it, but don't know if it =3D actually=3D20 exists. From what I can gather, it can be installed into an electronic =3D console=3D20 to repair it. How exactly does it work? Sounds like something out of =3D Star Trek=3D20 to me.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>Curious-er and curious-er. </FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>-Rebekah</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_001D_01BFD22D.CD5DC8A0--    
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: reed organs From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Fri, 09 Jun 2000 13:47:54   At 01:09 PM 6/9/2000 -0700, you wrote: >Question: are two-manual and pedal French harmoniums still being = made?<snip>   Dunno about in France, but supposedly the Dutch are still doing it. Not long ago, there was a dutch reed organ on eBay, full sized console in = dutch modern design (somewhat resembling a RockOla jukeboke, of course), 2m, = full typical Euro pedalboard (straight and flat) with lotsa stops. Swell pedal was way off to the right side and canted, sort of like an afterthough, typical of continental design. I forget who made the thing, but it was quite amusing!   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: New list member, looking for opinions From: "Ray Ahrens" <ray_ahrens@hotmail.com> Date: Fri, 09 Jun 2000 16:22:24 CDT   > >I'm new to this list, and so far have enjoyed your postings.<snip> > >Welcome! I'm sure you'll find this list MOST entertaining.     If one doesn't mind wading through invective, hyperbole, and groundless hypotheses. Seems to be a specialty of a small subset of this list. ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Britson Kit From: "Paul Soulek" <soulek@frontiernet.net> Date: Fri, 09 Jun 2000 17:17:21 -0500   There is some information on the kit at http://www.cluff.net/used.htm   Hope this helps!   Paul   Rebekah Ingram wrote: > > Hi everyone, > > Does anyone here have any experience working with or installing the > Britson kit? I've heard of it, but don't know if it actually exists. > From what I can gather, it can be installed into an electronic console > to repair it. How exactly does it work? Sounds like something out of > Star Trek to me. > > Curious-er and curious-er. > > -Rebekah