PipeChat Digest #1451 - Sunday, June 11, 2000
 
Fw: running out of air
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Delaware Pistons
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Why Large Instruments are Necesary (LONG) x-post
  by "Ed Kolcz" <kolcz@prodigy.net>
Re: Delaware Pistons
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
Paying singers
  by "Tom Jones" <tomj@netpath.net>
Re: running out of air
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Pipe Organ tuned to Dr. Kellner
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
Bob's Stock market thoughts.
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
Re: Why Large Instruments are Necesary (LONG) x-post
  by "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com>
Re: Delaware Pistons
  by <flcg1018@mails.fju.edu.tw>
Re: Delaware Pistons
  by "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@mailbox.syr.edu>
Re: Delaware Pistons --revised reply...
  by <flcg1018@mails.fju.edu.tw>
Re: Delaware Pistons (where, oh where, did they hide the d***  setterboar
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net>
Re: Pipe Organ tuned to Dr. Kellner
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Why Large Instruments are Necesary (LONG) x-post
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Delaware Pistons
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
 


(back) Subject: Fw: running out of air From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sun, 11 Jun 2000 15:32:16 -0500   Cute story. On the other side of the coin, wasn't there a bell the = organist could ring to tell the organ-pumper "full steam ahead?" I understand often times on instruments with numerous bellows, the pumper would "run" back and forth over them to keep the wind up- kinda like football practice: running thru tires.   Rick     ----- Original Message ----- From: Carl & Grace Snip <cgscissors@followme.com> To: Pipechat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, June 11, 2000 3:25 PM Subject: Fw: running out of air     > I recall that following a concert on the organ at Roy Thompson Hall in > Toronto, Carlo Curley was in the Green Room receiving greetings and > adulations from the attendees. I was almost at the head of the line = when I > heard someone ask Carlo something or other about the instrument, and = heard a > response that the organ was underwinded; at a specific juncture near the end > of one of the last works, he had drawn additional ranks into play and = was > annoyed to hear the entire instrument flatten considerably. A telling tale > for anyone matching blowers to organs to ensure the wind demand can be = met > by the blower/trunking installation. > > Regarding manually-raised wind, I remember my late father (a church organist > for 65+ years) telling of an organ someplace in the Netherlands that had = a > metal rod running through it from the console back to the pumper's spot. > This rod IIRC had a handle at the console end and a spring-loaded = pointer at > the pumping location, such that if the organist wanted to drop the wind > pressure for a particularly quiet section of music, he would twist the > handle to "Low." As it rotated, the spring-loaded pointer would make a > small scraping sound, audible only to the pumper, who would the look up = to > see what to do with the wind. At the end of the quiet section, the organist > could ask for full wind to be restored. > > My dad said it was possible to under-match the pumping rate down to a > certain point without causing the pipe speech to "break." If he were still > around I'd ask him whether or not there was flattening to any degree = when > this was done. I recall him telling me that somewhere along the line, while > practicing for services, somebody had wanted to play VERY softly during = a > service with a particular registration, but found the organ too loud. = Not > wanting to retire any ranks, he instead asked the pumper to raise less wind, > and they experimented with it until they found the right amount, at = which > point they scratched a mark next to the reservoir or something like = that. > > They were so impressed with how it worked out they jury-rigged this = little > "bridge to engine room telegraph" so > the organist could call for wind changes without saying a word. > > Doesn't that just blow you away! (heh heh heh) > > crsnip > > -----Original Message----- > From: Jon C. Habermaas <opus1100@catoe.org> > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Date: Sunday, June 11, 2000 10:15 AM > Subject: Re: running out of air > > > >How spoiled we are with electric blowers that we forget that the famous > >organs of Europe originally had to be hand pumped. (snip) > > It's always fun when I get to use that word! <g> > > My father told me that some of the larger European organs had foot-operated > bellows that resembled a Stairmaster; one even had three sets of bellows > linked together in such a way that the pumper would have to do "crossovers" > with his legs. These all apparently used a heavy-duty dowel resembling = a > towel bar for the pumper to grip with his hands while his legs got a > workout. > > >jch > > > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Delaware Pistons From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 11 Jun 2000 13:39:34 -0700   Look for a setter-board somewhere, either on the console or back in the organ. They're an unmitigated nuisance, but they saved lots of money on combination actions.   Cheers,   Bud   Rebekah Ingram wrote:   > Does anyone know anything about how to set pistons on Delaware organs? > There is no "set" button on mine, and holding the piston down while > changing the stops doesn't seem to be working either. > > Help? > > -Rebekah > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Why Large Instruments are Necesary (LONG) x-post From: "Ed Kolcz" <kolcz@prodigy.net> Date: Sun, 11 Jun 2000 16:38:43 -0400   Dear List,   I'll second everything Monty had to say. I too have been involved in mega-parishes most of my life (6000+ families).   One of the biggest problems I had was that I was never home. Even with = 1-2 assistants. The money I made was great but it takes it's toll on family life. When my 3 kids were young (10 and younger) it wasn't too bad but now they're in their 'teens and have to be taxi'ed everywhere. Marching band rehearsals, parades, concerts, = volunteer work, dances, etc,etc,etc. I can't tell you how many times my wife and I had to split in opposite directions. I am now in a small parish. Don't have a mega-organ to play, have only had one wedding and 3 funerals in a year and much more 'quality' time with the family. Do I miss the big organs ? Yes. Do I miss the money ? Yes. But you have to draw the line somewhere. Maybe after the kids are in college and out of the house, I = can return to the mega-parish but until then....I'm enjoying the break.   Ed Kolcz Music Director/Organist St.Luke Catholic Church Coconut Creek, FL   ----- Original Message ----- From: <RMB10@aol.com> To: <piporg-l@albany.edu>; <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, June 10, 2000 10:43 AM Subject: Why Large Instruments are Necesary (LONG) x-post     > Dear List- > As one who regularly presided at one of the world's largest pipe organs, = I > can say that I regularly used most of the 205 ranks I had at my = disposal. > However, I can also say that I have heard people play large instruments and > played them like they were 35 rank instruments. I hope that Bellvue Baptist > has an organist who will not be afraid to use the potential that organ has. > The thing is not to be afraid of the organ. I have hosted hundreds of > organists who came to see and play the organ at Calvary. Most of them were > used to playing "normal" sized instruments, and I wold guess that 75% of them > were freaked out at the size console alone. Those were the people who > would just reach for the 8,4,2,Mixture on the Great and play a little ditty. > I always enjoyed the organists who came in with the attitude of "I'm = gonna > tame this beast" because they were the ones who knew how to take = advantage of > all that the organ has to offer. It doesn't take any different = technique to > play an organ over 100 ranks, it takes a different state of mind. One = has to > be creative and enjoy all the flexibility and subtle nuances that can be > created with an instrument of unlimited possibility. I congratulate Bellvue > on their choice. They were not short sighted as to what they need musically. > Plus, I know that if Tom Hazleton is involved, the organ will be a > masterpiece. > > What a lot of people don't understand is what a "mega-church" needs > musically. I don't mean this next line to be a slam against people who serve > smaller sized churches, but it's the truth. A 400 member church and a 20,000 > member church are two different organizations, and musical demands are > radically different, and unless one has been involed with a church of = over > 3000-4000 members, you don't and can't understand what is required in a > mega-church. Also, one needs to take into account the sheer size of the > building. Here in South Carolina, there is a large Baptist church with = a > 3500 seat sanctuary. Their organ is 53 or so ranks. They are hugely scaled > and use fairly high wind pressure. The organ is not nearly large enough for > the cubic footage of the room. The reason that they only have a moderate > sized instrument was the result of some politics that resulted in the family > leaving the church and not giving the full amount of the organ. The family > had only donated enough for 53 ranks at that point, so that's what the church > got. As a result of this, the church relies mainly on its orchestra, = and the > organ has become a filler, rather than the backbone that everything else is > built upon. That organ just isn't strong enough to lead congregational > singing by itself, nor does it have the variety of stops needed to > sucessfully do the variety of musical styles that a large congregation does. > > Not only does a mega church do the regular Sunday morning and evening > services, but there are at least several weddings a week, funerals most > everyday, special services several times a week, concerts most every weekend, > sometimes special organ concerts during the week, pageants at Christmas and > Easter that rival Broadway productions, etc. The organ needs to be able to > lead the music of these radically different events, and meet the musical > needs and tastes of the people involved, therefore the need for traditional > "classical stops", theatre/gospel ranks, orchestral voices, etc. > > So, there is a reason that the Bellvue organ has to be big, so those of you > who think it's a waste to have an organ of that size, think again. It meets > the musical demands of a congregation the size of a small city, and it also > meets the sound/space requirements of a mamouth auditorium. > > I don't mean to insult anyone who is serving a small congregation, but having > worked in a mega-church for several years, I know what is required of = not > only the organ, but the organist. > > Monty Bennett > former Organist/Associate Minister of Music, Calvary Church, Charlotte, = NC > now a Funeral Director/Embalmer > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Delaware Pistons From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Sun, 11 Jun 2000 16:07:59 -0500   At 6/11/00 02:00 PM, Rebekah wrote: >Does anyone know anything about how to set pistons on Delaware organs? >There is no "set" button on mine, and holding the piston down while >changing the stops doesn't seem to be working either.   Hi, Rebekah!   As others have suggested, it's likely that there is some sort of "setterboard" located somewhere. However, if the organ is especially small, there might be a remote possibility that there is in fact *no* adjustable combination action -- that the pistons were wired from the factory in the existing combinations, and that's that. (I hope you *do* find a setterboard...! <g>)   If it proves to have "permanent" combinations, there would almost = certainly be *some* way for your organ technician to re-wire them to your desires...but you would have to have him look inside the console and find the proper junctions.   Good luck!!   Tim   PS -- another errant thought...is there a (perhaps) unlabeled toe stud somewhere apart from the "normal" ones that doesn't seem to do anything? I've seen consoles with the setter-piston arranged as a toestud (with no corresponding thumb piston......why?? who knows?!)      
(back) Subject: Paying singers From: "Tom Jones" <tomj@netpath.net> Date: Sun, 11 Jun 2000 17:04:30 -0400   I apologize for the off-topic post and would ask that this not become a thread. Please reply privately if you're willing to help. Any of you with paid section leaders-soloists in an otherwise volunteer choir: Would you be willing to share with me what you pay them, or any ideas about what you think reasonable? We're considering initiating this practice, and the committee wants as much information about pay = scales as I can pull together. Thanks.   Tom Jones tomj@netpath.net Organist/Choir Director Mebane Presbyterian Church, Mebane, N.C.  
(back) Subject: Re: running out of air From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sun, 11 Jun 2000 14:10:02 -0700   We had the feeders restored on the Koehnken & Grimm at the Shrine of the Immaculata in Cincinnati ... that organ is 20-something stops, no Open = Wood in the pedal, and it is STILL hard work with more than a few stops drawn. But = the organ seemed "livelier" when it was hand-pumped ... that might have had to = do with the fact that we didn't change out the blowers when we swapped organs = ... the moribund Mather we demolished was about the same size, but had fewer = 8' stops, so the blower might have been a little bit on the small side for = the K & G ... it was relatively late, with fairly large-scale 8's.   Cheers,   Bud   "Jon C. Habermaas" wrote:   > How spoiled we are with electric blowers that we forget that the famous > organs of Europe originally had to be hand pumped. One of my favorite > stories is of one famous organist who composed a great piece and debuted = it > on a local feast day. After services a sumptioius repaste was laid out = for > the parishioners and just as he was coming to "grande climax" he = discovered > he had no "wind"...all his pumpers had deserted their posts for the = feast > table....after that an edict was issued that the pumpers did not get to = eat > until after the organ stopped playing. To savour the experience, an OHS > convention usually has one or two instruments that still can be hand = pumped. > > jch > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe Organ tuned to Dr. Kellner From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Sun, 11 Jun 2000 14:37:47 PDT   >I gotta tell you I don't >think I ever want to hear equal temperment again! Have I lost my >mind, I =   >hope not?!   Nope, you haven't lost your mind, you have found True Music. Now you know =   what the organ is supposed to sound like.   Ladies and Gentleman, I think we have another convert to our "Death to = Equal Temperament Society"   Equal temperament sounded like crap 150 years ago when it was first = foisted on the music world, despite 150 years of cultural conditioning it still sounds like crap, it's just that evreryone has been so numbed by it that when they hear a temperament with a little variety, optimized for the = music being played, everyone is ecstatic.   As an experiment: Try playing Well-Tempered Clavier in Kellner and report back to us on whether Bach was really an advocate of equal-temperament.   Finally now you see why my small coffee shop organs will be unequally = tuned, albeit not in Kellner but in a modified Villotti.   >The organ dripped pure silver everywhere.   Sure that wasn't overheated tin fron your pipework; this may have been a mixed blessing. :-D   DG ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Bob's Stock market thoughts. From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Sun, 11 Jun 2000 14:45:13 PDT     Sorry this is off topic but I had to respond to Bob's "the sky is falling" =   economic predictions.   While it is true that we've had an extraordinary several years, it is unlikely that a general crash is coming. Expect mild (2-5%) increases in stock valuations over the next couple of years, as we regress back to the historical mean return of 10%/year.   I remember back when I was working as a software engineer in 1994-1996. Back then the market was around 5000, and despite the gloomy predictions = of experts that the market was dangerously overvalued and ripe for a "major correction", I squirred away a great quantity of money into stocks. It doesn't seem like such a foolish move in retrospect. In fact it provided the financial security for me to be willing to get my recent MS degree = going to school full time.   Keep this is mind. ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Why Large Instruments are Necesary (LONG) x-post From: "Dave G." <dave_hat@hotmail.com> Date: Sun, 11 Jun 2000 14:52:03 PDT   >and much more 'quality' time with the family. Do I miss the big >organs ? Yes. Do I miss the money ? Yes. But you have to draw the = line >somewhere.   Good for you for standing up to the more-money-more-stuff-bigger-car-bigger-house-at-whatever-cost peer = pressure created by our hyperconsumerist society. You seem to have your priorities =   right and made prudent decisions.   America needs more real people like you.   You have no idea how many grasping greedy superficial geeks there are in = my line of work (computer industry).   DG   ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Delaware Pistons From: <flcg1018@mails.fju.edu.tw> Date: Mon, 12 Jun 2000 06:01:23 +0800 (CST)   Ah, yes, setter boards.... The only organ I have played that had one was an Aeolian Skinner built around 1955... The setter boards were the the right and the left of the Great manual... and pulled out....   I've heard that some setter boards are reached by pulling up the music rack and looking inside to see what one can see....   And, um, some pistons cannot be changed by the organist... they are pre-set and if they are to be changed, most honorable organ technician must be called in...     Best wishes to all...       Morton Belcher fellow pipechat list member...       On Sun, 11 Jun 2000 quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote:   > Look for a setter-board somewhere, either on the console or back in the > organ. They're an unmitigated nuisance, but they saved lots of money on > combination actions. > > Cheers, > > Bud > > Rebekah Ingram wrote: > > > Does anyone know anything about how to set pistons on Delaware organs? > > There is no "set" button on mine, and holding the piston down while > > changing the stops doesn't seem to be working either. > > > > Help? > > > > -Rebekah > >  
(back) Subject: Re: Delaware Pistons From: "Rebekah Ingram" <rringram@mailbox.syr.edu> Date: Sun, 11 Jun 2000 18:03:40 -0400 (EDT)   On Sun, 11 Jun 2000, Tim Bovard wrote:   > As others have suggested, it's likely that there is some sort of > "setterboard" located somewhere. However, if the organ is especially > small, there might be a remote possibility that there is in fact *no* > adjustable combination action -- that the pistons were wired from the > factory in the existing combinations, and that's that. (I hope you *do* > find a setterboard...! <g>)   So do I...if that -is- the case, somebody needs a lesson on registrations. I have one 16' and it does not come on on any of the pistons. In addition, I've found some -really- strange settings, like the Wald Flute 8', Bourdon 4' and the mixture. I hope it was just one of the parish's good samaritan organists!   > PS -- another errant thought...is there a (perhaps) unlabeled toe stud > somewhere apart from the "normal" ones that doesn't seem to do anything? > I've seen consoles with the setter-piston arranged as a toestud (with no > corresponding thumb piston......why?? who knows?!)   I looked, but...I don't have -any- toe studs!!!   -Rebekah    
(back) Subject: Re: Delaware Pistons --revised reply... From: <flcg1018@mails.fju.edu.tw> Date: Mon, 12 Jun 2000 06:11:45 +0800 (CST)         Ah, yes, setter boards.... The only organ I have played that had one was an Aeolian Skinner built around 1955... The setter boards were to the =   the right and the left of the Great manual...and underneath the places to the left and right of the Great manual where one might place a hymnal and/or prayer book and other assorted items... These two "drawers" pulled =   out.... and one would see many small off-on type switches... Since I was a guest, I did not change the combinations; but I guess after one became familiar with the organ, one would learn how to change the combinations rather quickly...   The nice thing about that organ were the beautiful Great diapason ranks... 8, 4, and Fourniture III-IV ....   At any rate, I've heard that some setter boards are reached by pulling up the music rack and looking inside to see what one can see....   And, um, some pistons cannot be changed by the organist... they are pre-set and if they are to be changed, most honorable organ technician must be called in...     Best wishes to all...       Morton Belcher fellow pipechat list member...       On Sun, 11 Jun 2000 quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote:   > Look for a setter-board somewhere, either on the console or back in the > organ. They're an unmitigated nuisance, but they saved lots of money on > combination actions. > > Cheers, > > Bud > > Rebekah Ingram wrote: > > > Does anyone know anything about how to set pistons on Delaware organs? > > There is no "set" button on mine, and holding the piston down while > > changing the stops doesn't seem to be working either. > > > > Help? > > > > -Rebekah > >   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org      
(back) Subject: Re: Delaware Pistons (where, oh where, did they hide the d*** setterboard?!) From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@arkansas.net> Date: Sun, 11 Jun 2000 18:16:31 -0500   At 6/11/00 06:03 PM, Rebekah wrote:   >So do I...if that -is- the case, somebody needs a lesson on = registrations. >I have one 16' and it does not come on on any of the pistons. In = addition, >I've found some -really- strange settings, like the Wald Flute 8', = Bourdon >4' and the mixture.   Hi again, Rebekah!   LOL!! (about the "strange" existing combos...)   This would sorta seem like evidence that there must be a setterboard somewhere. So, I'll offer what will hopefully be a few places for you to look for one, if you haven't already.   As Morton mentioned, many setterboards are located in little "drawers" to either or each side of the keycheeks of the manuals (either above or below the keydesk itself). I'd presume you don't have these, as you would have found them already (even if with your knees...<g>). I have also seen setterboards accessed by opening one or both of the side panels of the console (do they have hinges or keyholes showing?). It is entirely concievable that the setterboard might be located under the console top, = or within the organ itself somewhere (although much more inconvenient...). I've even seen an organ where the setterboard was located in a little locked box on the wall of the sacristy, in the *next room* from the = console and organ!! (why in the world would any self-respecting builder do *that* to a potential organist???!)   USUALLY, a setterboard is located such that the organist can access it without dismantling portions of the organ or console itself...so look for any sort of hinged or removable panel about the console or organ case. Unfortunately, this kind of rule is made to be broken -- and it would = sound as though you have just such a case.   One thing that's for sure -- any "remotely-located" setterboard has to be connected to the organ wiring with some sort of cable. If you find no evidence of anything at or within the console itself, or within the "tuner's access way" into the organ chamber/case, try to look for any = organ cables/conduits that leave the console and do *not* seem to lead directly into the organ chamber/case. Perhaps you might find a "hidden = setterboard" at the end of them.....even if it might be in the sacristy!   Again -- good luck in your search!! Do let us all know what you = ultimately discover!!   Cheers!   Tim B.      
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe Organ tuned to Dr. Kellner From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sun, 11 Jun 2000 16:07:06   At 02:37 PM 6/11/2000 PDT, you wrote: >As an experiment: Try playing Well-Tempered Clavier in Kellner >and report back to us on whether Bach was really an advocate of >equal-temperament.<snip>   History says otherwise, as does the history of the art of music written after that time.   DeserTBoB.      
(back) Subject: Re: Why Large Instruments are Necesary (LONG) x-post From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sun, 11 Jun 2000 16:10:43   At 02:52 PM 6/11/2000 PDT, you wrote: >You have no idea how many grasping greedy superficial geeks there are in = my >line of work (computer industry).<snip>   ROFLMAO!!!!!! :::in tears:::   dB  
(back) Subject: Re: Delaware Pistons From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sun, 11 Jun 2000 19:38:23 -0500   quilisma@socal.rr.com wrote: > > Look for a setter-board somewhere, either on the console or back in the > organ. They're an unmitigated nuisance, but they saved lots of money on > combination actions.   I used to play a Harrison & Harrison organ in England that had setter boards in little glass cases next to the console which were miniature drawknobs and really rather cute. Although this system is, as everyone else has mentioned, an almost unmitigated nuisance, the Harrison system had one advantage. This was that there were three positions for the little knobs -- on, off, and neutral. In the neutral position the stop stayed on if already on, or stayed off if already off, so this gave the system possibilities that most combination actions don't have.   On another note, unlike normal pistons which only contact momentarily, the setters in drawers stay contacted as long as you continue to press the piston. I came across one organ in Pennsylvania where a screw had come out on a toe stud, keeping the toe stud permanently on. The organ had drawknobs in plastic sheaths, and they all cooked and melted! Yet another hazard ...   John Speller