PipeChat Digest #1453 - Monday, June 12, 2000
 
Re: Organ tuned to Kellner - Bruce Heaven! (Ron Severin)
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: Britson Kits
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Weird Pistons
  by "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net>
Re: Our Skinner project (long)
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Organ tuned to Kellner - Bruce Heaven! (Ron Severin)
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: pitch sagging
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Organ tuned to Kellner - Bruce Heaven! (Ron Severin) From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sun, 11 Jun 2000 23:05:16   At 01:40 AM 6/12/2000 EDT, you wrote: >Kellner does not interfere with the normal resonance >of the pipes like ET does.<snip>   Care to explain that hypothesis a little bit?   >To hear an organ in Kellner is a cleansing, >silvery, >and beautiful experience. I can't recommend it enough.<snip>   So's a colonic, but it, too, has some drawbacks. Kindly go find something in F# or Gb from the Romantics, play it, and them come back and tell me = how "cleansed" you feel!   >Maybe people >will stop writing in totally absurd keys too. It's not necessary. When I find >something >in 5 flats it goes to two sharps, 6 flats it goes to one sharp, 5 sharps goes >to 2 flats. >It works for me! Oh! 7 flats my favorite goes to no accidentals at = all.<snip>   OK, so why have written music at all, then? I think you're missing some fairly obvious points having to do with performance here....   >I'm >bad, real >bad!<snip>   Wow...only time I ever saw anything dig a hole deeper and faster was a Caterpillar excavator when it was getting real close to the operator's lunch time!   :::getting out the dental tools once more:::   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Re: Britson Kits From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sun, 11 Jun 2000 23:09:21   At 06:50 PM 6/11/2000 -0700, you wrote: >Yesterday I posted something about the Britson D105 being offered as an >add-on module for pipe organs. I have since found out from the company = that >it was a limited time offering, and will not be available.<snip>   Then we can surmise that Cluff's website is incorrect, also. At ten grand for a "kit" minus any wood, this thing had better sound pretty good!!   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: Weird Pistons From: "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net> Date: Sun, 11 Jun 2000 23:25:51 -0700   The first organ I ever took lessons on was a Mostly Moller in Grandale = Pres Church in Detroit. It was a small two man organ. To set the combo, you would press the piston, and while holding it in, pull the stops you = wanted against the vacumn holding them in. You would hear an audible click, and the stop would be on that piston.   The console was winded, so all the pistons worked with wind.   Dennis    
(back) Subject: Re: Our Skinner project (long) From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 12 Jun 2000 02:23:07 EDT   Dear Bob:   This will break your heart, I knew a guy who used a ban saw to cut up = strings for mutation stops 2 2/3' and 2' Block flutes and 1 3/5' to Baroqueize = Mollers, Skinners. He was an equal opportunity organ abuser. The damage is done and irrreversable. This is the kind of guy you want to keep out of your organ chamber. If the =   organist is encourageing this kind of behavior should be fired and black balled.   End of story!   Ron  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ tuned to Kellner - Bruce Heaven! (Ron Severin) From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 12 Jun 2000 02:31:18 EDT   Dear Desert:   Don't knock it if you haven't tried it. By the way who cares about F# = minor or Major. You sound like the whole world will come to and end without them.   Ron  
(back) Subject: Re: pitch sagging From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 12 Jun 2000 00:00:58   At 02:01 AM 6/12/2000 EDT, you wrote: >Now the truth comes out, those organs were cheap!<snip>   I wish I could remember the discussion about the "Jacqued-up" organs...it was amusing. I think LaMirande had a LOT to say about this guy...but then again, LaMirande has a LOT to say about just about everything....   >They probably used a liberal >amount of flexhaust which causes unsteady wind and cavitiations and >tremulations.<snip>   Again, you're getting into turf that's a little damp for you. A perfect allegory to this situation can be found in residential and light = commerical HVAC systems. Up until the mid '60s, the duct systems for almost all = these installations was galvanized sheet steel, of standardized proportions. Galvanized, as well as the tin-plate that went before it, provided excellent strength and low resistance to flow, but poor thermal and noise conductivity. Enter "Flex-Duct" around this time, which consisted of corrugated sections of plastic molded onto a coiled wire "frame", with an integral Fiberglas insulation layer and a moisture barrier. Strength was no longer available, as all installations were to be "form fit". However, due to the accordion-like nature of the duct surface, noise transmission was drastically reduced. However, surface resistance to flow became = higher.   Was it a problem? No. The higher resistance to flow simply upped the static pressure in the main plenum somewhat; flow would essentially remain the same, assuming the system's blower could adequately handle the = increase of static pressure. For example, a 5 ton system was retrofitted with FlexDuct after many complaints about the system's original, smooth galvanized duct system was simply too noisey. Rather than fabricate elaborate sound traps, a decision was made to replace the ductwork. To expedite matters, the same diameter of FlexDuct was used to replace the galvanized.   Now, a 5 ton direct expansion system will usually move about 2000 CFM of air, which was close to what this one did. I took Magnehelic readings of static pressure and flow in the plenum before the conversion, and after. The results? The system originally moved 1950 CFM at the main plenum at a SP of .2" WG; after the retrofit, it moved 1975 CFM at .35" WG. Why? In this case, the slight increase of static pressure better loaded the reverse-curved fan, actually giving MORE flow. The better loading showed up on the AmpClamp as slightly more current draw to the fan motor. Of course, this flow increase probably would not occur in a pipe organ, with its axial blade fans, which respond differently to loading conditions.   Flexhaust, a product that's been around since the 1930's, has a much smoother overall surface topography than does FlexDuct. Thus, I don't think your "hypothesis" of the Flexhaust causing "cavitations" and "tremulations" (??) holds any air....er, water, unless the Flexhaust was grossly undersized. At that much undersizing, it is probable that the organ would have wind problems, no matter what the ducting material. Rather, I would think there is an overall poor design at play in this = organ (i.e., lack of concussion bellows where indicated, use of a central, large regulating reservoir nearer the blower than individuals at the chests, etc.), or, there could indeed be a malfunctioning curtain valve, broken springs (or total lack thereof), and/or too much dead weight on the = regulator.   DeserTBoB