PipeChat Digest #1466 - Saturday, June 17, 2000
 
Re: Dr. Laura and the Organist
  by <Posthorn8@aol.com>
Fw: Installing a Rector (X-posted)
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
a 19th century organ - hypothetical questions (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Ivory 2-manual keyboard stack for Sale
  by "Sam Vause \(@Home\)" <vause@home.com>
open systems organ emulations
  by <support@opensystemsorgans.com>
Re: a 19th century organ - hypothetical questions (X-posted)
  by <TRACKELECT@cs.com>
Re: a 19th century organ - hypothetical questions (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
O Quanta Qualia
  by <BooBoo8800@aol.com>
Re: a 19th century organ - hypothetical questions (X-posted)
  by <KurtvonS@aol.com>
Sacramento "Jardine"
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: a 19th century organ - hypothetical questions (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Installing a Rector
  by <SProt82850@cs.com>
Re: Installing a Rector (X-posted)
  by <SProt82850@cs.com>
Re: a 19th century organ - hypothetical questions (X-posted)
  by <KurtvonS@aol.com>
Re: a 19th century organ - hypothetical questions (X-posted)
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: a 19th century organ - hypothetical questions (X-posted)
  by <KurtvonS@aol.com>
Re: O Quanta Qualia
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: a 19th century organ - hypothetical questions (X-posted)
  by <TRACKELECT@cs.com>
Re: O Quanta Qualia
  by <quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: a 19th century organ - hypothetical questions (X-posted)
  by <KurtvonS@aol.com>
Re: a 19th century organ - hypothetical questions (X-posted)
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: O Quanta Qualia
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
Re: O Quanta Qualia
  by "Robert Ehrhardt" <r_ehrh@bellsouth.net>
Re: a 19th century organ - hypothetical questions (X-posted)
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Dr. Laura and the Organist From: <Posthorn8@aol.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 08:21:45 EDT   In a message dated 6/16/00 6:00:22 PM Eastern Daylight Time, desertbob@rglobal.net writes:   << Well, that's your opinion. Mine is that she's a psychotic bitch >>   I have a friend who is a wonderful counselor. She calls her Dr. Bulldozer. = I agree!!   Tim  
(back) Subject: Fw: Installing a Rector (X-posted) From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 07:37:15 -0500   .....you want 'War March' played like Vincent Price did it in Dr. Phibes??   Rick     ----- Original Message ----- From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@rglobal.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, June 16, 2000 9:36 PM Subject: Re: Installing a Rector (X-posted)     > At 07:38 PM 6/16/2000 -0700, you wrote: > >Sorry, Senior Moment ... someone wanted an anthem for installing a > >Rector.<snip> > > Installation's a snap...a few Molly bolts and some paint...he's in = there! > > Seriously...how 'bout "War March Of The Priests"? Seems appropriate for = a > lot of them... > > DeserTBoB > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: a 19th century organ - hypothetical questions (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 11:04:31 -0700   Suppose that one had access to an organ of the 1800s ... a fine instrument, in good condition, but with the following:   The Swell stops only go to tenor c ... there is a Unison Bass that goes all the way down, but everything else stops.   The 2-octave pedal has one stop: a 16' Bourdon.   Here are my questions:   (1) I've seen rebuilds where the Swell stops were completed down to low C. Does this require replacing the chest, or can it be done with jump sliders, or whatever? Would this violate the OHS restoration guidelines?   (2) If it were possible to leave the original Pedal chest and action intact (but disconnected), would it be a heinous crime to build a new Pedal chest and case that could be concealed behind the main case, in order to provide a modest independent Pedal organ? I'm presuming that the original action could be left alone, including the manual to pedal couplers. I'm also accepting the original two-octave range of the Pedal, so as not to have to disturb the couplers or the original clavier. The object, of course, is to leave the original work as intact as possible, so that the original configuration could be restored in the future, if that became desirable.   I'd be interested to hear opinions/arguments. I probably should add that this would be a working church organ, not a museum-piece.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Ivory 2-manual keyboard stack for Sale From: "Sam Vause \(@Home\)" <vause@home.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 11:17:16 -0700   http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3D360498933   I will also be offering a pedalboard assembly and a 4' Schalmei (sp?) soon...   Note: this is a cross-posting, so please DON'T "Reply All"!!!!!!!! --sam Sam Vause (Chandler, AZ)      
(back) Subject: open systems organ emulations From: <support@opensystemsorgans.com> Date: 17 Jun 2000 12:17:00 -0700   Hi, everybody.   I'm nearing completion of an emulation of a 14-stop Fisk, implemented in = software to run on standard, inexpensive hardware (a PC with a = Soundblaster Live! card). I'm interested in your opinions of this = approach, and I'm looking for a handful of people who would like to beta = test this instrument.   One of the things I'd like to hear from you is the styles of organs you = would be most interested in. One of the advantages of this approach is = that the software will be inexpensive enough that you won't think twice = about owning more than one emulation. That means that you won't be = hampered by an organ with a distinctive style, like the Fisk. You'll use = it to play Bach; for Widor, you'll just switch to a French organ.   I have a four-page Word document describing the approach and the prototype = in more detail. I don't know what list etiquette has to say about = attaching something of that size to a general mailing. I'll be happy to = send it to the list or individually to any of you who are interested.   Dick Meckstroth   By the way, I used to subscribe to a couple of other lists: one called = piporg that I dropped because it was poisoned with invective, and one = called eorg, for electronic organs. I've lost track of their addresses. = Do they still exist?      
(back) Subject: Re: a 19th century organ - hypothetical questions (X-posted) From: <TRACKELECT@cs.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 19:36:20 EDT   Bud:   You have posed some excellent questions here. I'll address them one at a time. But I must stress that in a situation like this the prime directive = is: DO NOT HARM THE ORIGINAL. 1) The least intrusive way to extend the swell ranks down to CC is to = mount contacts on the action in a convenient place and put an electric action = chest somewhere. This probably won't fit in the swell box so an additional box = must be constructed complete with shades (are you sure you still want to do this?). 2) Again the least intrusive way to do this is to mount contacts and build = an electric chest. This way you don't have to disconnect the original chest.   Also: you are adding pipework here. This will use more wind. It is best to =   use a separate blower and regulator for this. Using these methods all of = the additions can be easily removed if it is decided to restore the organ to original condition. This also prevents modifications to the original wind system - sawing holes in wind lines and such.   If there is anything that I hate it is to see an old organ that was a fine =   instrument in it's own right all cobbled up with the pipework modified, = cheap supply house consoles, stuff crowded in any old place, etc.......... And = if there is anything that I love it is to find an old organ in original condition, untouched except for maintenance. Candle wax dripped on the = rack boards by tuners before Mr. Edison invented his light bulb, feeder bellows =   that still work. Graffiti from the boys that pumped ("Ed MacGillicutty hot =   air merchant 1904"). This is what I live for.   Alan B.  
(back) Subject: Re: a 19th century organ - hypothetical questions (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 16:51:46 -0700   I basically reached the same conclusion ... if I need a working church = organ that has more / does more than this instrument, beautiful though it is, then I = should go find a working church organ that has more / does more than this one, = and leave IT strictly ALONE.   Cheers,   Bud   TRACKELECT@cs.com wrote:   > Bud: > > You have posed some excellent questions here. I'll address them one at a > time. But I must stress that in a situation like this the prime = directive is: > DO NOT HARM THE ORIGINAL. > 1) The least intrusive way to extend the swell ranks down to CC is to = mount > contacts on the action in a convenient place and put an electric action = chest > somewhere. This probably won't fit in the swell box so an additional box = must > be constructed complete with shades (are you sure you still want to do > this?). > 2) Again the least intrusive way to do this is to mount contacts and = build an > electric chest. This way you don't have to disconnect the original = chest. > > Also: you are adding pipework here. This will use more wind. It is best = to > use a separate blower and regulator for this. Using these methods all of = the > additions can be easily removed if it is decided to restore the organ to > original condition. This also prevents modifications to the original = wind > system - sawing holes in wind lines and such. > > If there is anything that I hate it is to see an old organ that was a = fine > instrument in it's own right all cobbled up with the pipework modified, = cheap > supply house consoles, stuff crowded in any old place, etc.......... And = if > there is anything that I love it is to find an old organ in original > condition, untouched except for maintenance. Candle wax dripped on the = rack > boards by tuners before Mr. Edison invented his light bulb, feeder = bellows > that still work. Graffiti from the boys that pumped ("Ed MacGillicutty = hot > air merchant 1904"). This is what I live for. > > Alan B. > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: O Quanta Qualia From: <BooBoo8800@aol.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 19:52:22 EDT   Dear list,   Sometime ago, I was listening to the CD "Riverside Revisited" with the = artist being Fred Swann. One of the selections on the CD is a beautiful fantasy-like piece of organ literature on the hymn tune "O Quanta Qualia." = I would very much like to grab a hold of the music to this beautiful piece, = but I have since lost the CD and its cover. All I remember about it is that = it is on Track 2. Does anyone know what piece this is and by what composer? =   Anyone with information on this, please reply privately.   Thank you !   Scott Myers  
(back) Subject: Re: a 19th century organ - hypothetical questions (X-posted) From: <KurtvonS@aol.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 20:06:17 EDT   In a message dated 6/17/00 6:50:59 PM Central Daylight Time, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes:   << if I need a working church organ that has more / does more than this instrument, beautiful though it is, then I =   should go find a working church organ that has more / does more than this one, = and leave IT strictly ALONE. >> Though I agree in principal, er...Principle!...I have to remind you that = if others hadn't brought work by previous builders up to the standards of = their time, we wouldn't have St. John the Divine, St. Sulpice, St.Paul's London, = or many score of other great instruments. The process of adapting the past = to present needs is valid, despite the need to preserve historic examples. = How many of us live in un-insulated Victorian cottages and skip out of the = back door at three in the morning to visit "Uncle John"? It's not easy to decide this; I have a dilemma of my own about wether to expand a lovely 1946 GDHarrison Aeolian-Skinner, or convince the church = they need to leave this small, but untouched and lovely example as it = stands.....  
(back) Subject: Sacramento "Jardine" From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 21:05:10 -0400   I just read a previous message about a concert at St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 15th St. Sacramento CA on a "Jardine" pipe organ. To set the record straight, since I didn't see anyone else do this, that organ is a William A. Johnson & Son Opus 503 dated 1877, 2 manuals, 17 ranks, = tracker, unless that situation has changed since the OHS visited there in 1988. It apparently was altered at some point. I have a picture taken in front of that church door with myself, 3 of my sons, and several cousins of my mother, whom I had never met before. That was the last day of that Convention, my first, and boy, was it hot = outside!   BTW in case anyone is wondering, and since I get frequent questions, the 1933 Kimball in the Worcester Memorial Auditorium remains status quo, = under wraps, but intact. The state is leasing the building from the city and the local Juvenile Court is in the basement. Judy Ollikkala, Worcester MA  
(back) Subject: Re: a 19th century organ - hypothetical questions (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 18:18:42 -0700   I would have less qualms if this wasn't one of two instruments by this = builder still extant. I was drawn to it because of the beauty of the case-work, = and its size ... 20 stops ... which, if it were more full-toned, would be just = right for our new building.   Organ Clearing House has MANY instruments that would serve, including a = fair number that Laufman rescued which have already been dismembered of their = cases, keyboards, action, pipes, or chests (not his doing, I hasten to add) and = will never BE organs again in their original form. One could construct a two or three-manual instrument using historic slider chests and pipes (but with = new electric pulldowns and a new detached keydesk following historical models) = out of such instruments with a (relatively) clear conscience.   As fond as I am of GHD's work, I've come more and more to regard his = instruments as a way-station along the road to the modern eclectic instrument. Some, = like Groton, Church of the Advent, St. Mary-the-Virgin, etc. deserve to be left untouched. Others are simply too mild and/or too limited; most have his = signature "reedless Great" and 2'-based Positiv.   But, there is a solution: A. Thompson-Allen & Co. at Yale does = museum-quality restorations AND ADDITIONS in the style, including GDH-style pitman = chests. Enough GDH Skinners have been pulled down that I'm sure Organ Clearing = House has a collection of Skinner pipe-work, So it WOULD be possible to enlarge a = GDH Skinner without violating the style of voicing OR chest construction.   Cheers,   Bud   KurtvonS@aol.com wrote:   > In a message dated 6/17/00 6:50:59 PM Central Daylight Time, > quilisma@socal.rr.com writes: > > << if I need a working church organ that > has more / does more than this instrument, beautiful though it is, then = I > should > go find a working church organ that has more / does more than this one, = and > leave > IT strictly ALONE. > >> > Though I agree in principal, er...Principle!...I have to remind you that = if > others hadn't brought work by previous builders up to the standards of = their > time, we wouldn't have St. John the Divine, St. Sulpice, St.Paul's = London, or > many score of other great instruments. The process of adapting the past = to > present needs is valid, despite the need to preserve historic examples. = How > many of us live in un-insulated Victorian cottages and skip out of the = back > door at three in the morning to visit "Uncle John"? > It's not easy to decide this; I have a dilemma of my own about wether to > expand a lovely 1946 GDHarrison Aeolian-Skinner, or convince the church = they > need to leave this small, but untouched and lovely example as it = stands..... > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Installing a Rector From: <SProt82850@cs.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 21:18:36 EDT   How about Mulet's "Tu es Petra"? Grinning from ear to ear!   Steven   Formerly an organist who had a priest who loved to hear that as he came = down the aisle for confessions as I rehearsed!! Wonder if he had GRAND = ambitions?  
(back) Subject: Re: Installing a Rector (X-posted) From: <SProt82850@cs.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 21:20:52 EDT   Silly me!! I offer the Mulet as a suitable postlude, of course!!   Parry's "I was glad" might be a suitable choice, skipping all the Vivat Regina's unless of course your rector has some GRAND ambitions = or....Grin-I simply can't seem to be serious, can I?   Steven   Formerly an organist...  
(back) Subject: Re: a 19th century organ - hypothetical questions (X-posted) From: <KurtvonS@aol.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 21:25:42 EDT   I agree that being one of a duet of remaining instruments has a great = bearing on originality. But what instrument of 20 stops would have only a unison bass in the Swell? And who is the builder?   I maintain and play the A-S I mentioned earlier. A rebuild was thwarted several years ago that would have pushed the instrument to about 50 ranks, =   with no connection to it's heritage at all. I've considered searching = for period A-S stops to expand the organ; and in truth, the lusty singing = could use it. However...the congregation (which just spent $70 grand on a new sound system) is reluctant to spend even a few thousand on the organ. = It's running on original leather, and will need lots of funds within five = years, I expect. Thompson-Allen is great, as is Dzeda (sp?) at Yale. = But.....now that they have this great sound system, and are amplifying the pastor and piano to new levels.......they have also started trying to amplify the = organ to "bring it up to snuff"..... Is it worth it, in the long run with that =   mentality!?   Kurt  
(back) Subject: Re: a 19th century organ - hypothetical questions (X-posted) From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 18:33:00 -0700   Appleton, and both the Great and the Swell are GG-compass, which sorta = explains it.   Cheers,   Bud   KurtvonS@aol.com wrote:   > I agree that being one of a duet of remaining instruments has a great = bearing > on originality. But what instrument of 20 stops would have only a = unison > bass in the Swell? And who is the builder? > > I maintain and play the A-S I mentioned earlier. A rebuild was thwarted > several years ago that would have pushed the instrument to about 50 = ranks, > with no connection to it's heritage at all. I've considered searching = for > period A-S stops to expand the organ; and in truth, the lusty singing = could > use it. However...the congregation (which just spent $70 grand on a new > sound system) is reluctant to spend even a few thousand on the organ. = It's > running on original leather, and will need lots of funds within five = years, I > expect. Thompson-Allen is great, as is Dzeda (sp?) at Yale. = But.....now > that they have this great sound system, and are amplifying the pastor = and > piano to new levels.......they have also started trying to amplify the = organ > to "bring it up to snuff"..... Is it worth it, in the long run with = that > mentality!? > > Kurt > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: a 19th century organ - hypothetical questions (X-posted) From: <KurtvonS@aol.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 21:46:46 EDT   In a message dated 6/17/00 8:35:37 PM Central Daylight Time, quilisma@socal.rr.com writes:   << Appleton, and both the Great and the Swell are GG-compass, which sorta explains it. >> Yes...that does make a difference!  
(back) Subject: Re: O Quanta Qualia From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 21:56:54 EDT   Dear Scott:   The hymn tune you refer to I believe was written by a Welsh composer, R. Vaughn Williams. He also composed some chorale preludes for organ. Look there for your answer.   Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Re: a 19th century organ - hypothetical questions (X-posted) From: <TRACKELECT@cs.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 22:02:03 EDT   In a message dated 6/17/00 8:07:38 PM Eastern Daylight Time, = KurtvonS@aol.com writes:   << Though I agree in principal, er...Principle!...I have to remind you = that if others hadn't brought work by previous builders up to the standards of = their time, we wouldn't have St. John the Divine, St. Sulpice, St.Paul's = London, or many score of other great instruments. The process of adapting the past = to present needs is valid, despite the need to preserve historic examples. = How many of us live in un-insulated Victorian cottages and skip out of the = back door at three in the morning to visit "Uncle John"? >>   You bring up some good points here. It is indeed true that 'the great masters' often reworked organs by their predecessors ( lets go way back - Schnitger reworking Fritzsche, Cavaille-Coll reworking Cliquot ) But when = you stumble upon an organ that has hit the century mark without alteration = that is something rare indeed. When we find this we must say 'stop! This must = be preserved.' There were many factory organs churned out by the thousands = after the turn of the century that I personally have no trouble sending to the landfill but when we are talking about pre 1900 organs that were built by distinguished builders like Roosevelt or Hook or little known builders = like Bates and Culley or John Brown these organs must be preserved. One alternative is to preserve the old organ and put a modern organ in another =   part of the sanctuary. This is what the Jacobiekirche in Hamburg did when they restored the Schnitger in the gallery and put a big Aeolian Skinner = in the front (I may be wrong about this but I was told this by none other = than Heinz Wunterlich). Of course not everyone has the big bucks or space for = that kind of thing but one could always install an (I'm biting my tongue) electronic organ instead of altering a century old organ.   Alan B.  
(back) Subject: Re: O Quanta Qualia From: <quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 19:05:15 -0700   The Episcopal Hymnal 1940 says the tune "O Quanta Qualia" is from "Methode du Plain Chant" (1808), one of those innumerable "French Breviary" tune-books, some grand, some not-so-grand, which replaced the plainsong hymns with metrical tunes; our harmonization is by John Bacchus Dykes (1868) ... perhaps RVW harmonized it for The English Hymnal, since he was the music editor. I don't think he wrote a chorale-prelude on it, though.   Cheers,   Bud   RonSeverin@aol.com wrote:   > Dear Scott: > > The hymn tune you refer to I believe was written by a Welsh composer, > R. Vaughn Williams. He also composed some chorale preludes for organ. > Look there for your answer. > > Ron Severin > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: a 19th century organ - hypothetical questions (X-posted) From: <KurtvonS@aol.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 22:15:29 EDT   I totally agree that one has to weigh the value and rarity of the = builder's extent work carefully (with the exception of the many who never built a = pipe their Mother's could love). But wasn't the extent Cliquot at St.Sulpice = well past the century mark when CC gave us the best organ in France? It's a tough call; no easy answers here!  
(back) Subject: Re: a 19th century organ - hypothetical questions (X-posted) From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 21:17:46 -0500   At 10:02 PM -0400 6/17/00, TRACKELECT@cs.com wrote: > One >alternative is to preserve the old organ and put a modern organ in = another >part of the sanctuary. This is what the Jacobiekirche in Hamburg did when >they restored the Schnitger in the gallery and put a big Aeolian Skinner = in >the front (I may be wrong about this but I was told this by none other = than >Heinz Wunterlich).   I really doubt that Jacobiekirche in Hamburg installed an AEolian-Skinner. I think you had better check you facts on this!!   David    
(back) Subject: Re: O Quanta Qualia From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 22:17:59 EDT   In a message dated 6/17/00 9:57:45 PM Eastern Daylight Time, RonSeverin@aol.com writes:   << The hymn tune you refer to I believe was written by a Welsh composer, R. Vaughn Williams. He also composed some chorale preludes for organ. Look there for your answer. >>   It's easy to see how one might think of "O quanta qualia" as yet another strong Vaughan Williams tune, but it is, in fact, from the Antiphoner of 1681. Paul Long has already come up with the answer to Scott's question, identifying the work as by Clarence Dickinson, whose music we are urged to =   play at Pipes Spectacular in October. Scott's recommendation causes me to want to hunt this up, in readiness for All Saints/All Souls this coming season.   On this same wonderful tune is an anthem by William Harris, with each = verse doing something new and wonderful, including some double choir bits. It begins with an enormous, grand Organ introduction. It is in the big old Church Anthem Book, but is, I presume published separately, although there =   may not be much hope that it is still in print.   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com  
(back) Subject: Re: O Quanta Qualia From: "Robert Ehrhardt" <r_ehrh@bellsouth.net> Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 21:43:36 -0500   The piece in question is "Joy of the Redeemed" by Clarence Dickinson. Robert Ehrhardt Noel Mem. UMC http://www.noelumc.org   ----- Original Message ----- From: <BooBoo8800@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2000 6:52 PM Subject: O Quanta Qualia     > Dear list, > > Sometime ago, I was listening to the CD "Riverside Revisited" with the artist > being Fred Swann. One of the selections on the CD is a beautiful > fantasy-like piece of organ literature on the hymn tune "O Quanta = Qualia." I > would very much like to grab a hold of the music to this beautiful = piece, but > I have since lost the CD and its cover. All I remember about it is that it > is on Track 2. Does anyone know what piece this is and by what = composer? > Anyone with information on this, please reply privately. > > Thank you ! > > Scott Myers > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: a 19th century organ - hypothetical questions (X-posted) From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 20:11:27   At 09:17 PM 6/17/2000 -0500, you wrote: >(I may be wrong about this but I was told this by none other than >>Heinz Wunterlich).<schniip>   He's not related to that OTHER organ grinder, Klaus Wunderlich, is he?   hehehehehe!   DeserTBoB