PipeChat Digest #1307 - Thursday, March 16, 2000
 
Kilgen and other builders of the period
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Kilgen and other builders of the period
  by <flcg1018@mails.fju.edu.tw>
Re: 'chorale prelude garbage'
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
Re: Organ Hardware
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Re: Looking for used pipes
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Bairstow Easter Anthem
  by "Weber, Richard" <rweber@aero.net>
Re: Bairstow Easter Anthem
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: 'chorale prelude garbage'
  by <Quilisma@socal.rr.com>
music
  by <Quilisma@socal.rr.com>
The Show Will Go On in Rochester this Saturday
  by "Ken Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com>
Re: Bairstow Easter Anthem
  by <Quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Composer Dates Needed
  by "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk>
Re: Composer Dates Needed
  by "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com>
Re: Composer Dates Needed
  by <Quilisma@socal.rr.com>
Re: Composer Dates Needed
  by "Evelyn Rowe" <efrowe@mindspring.com>
Robertson Screws (Was: Organ Hardware)
  by "Richard Schneider, President" <arpncorn@davesworld.net>
"robbies"
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Fw: Composer Dates Needed
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
 



(back) Subject: Kilgen and other builders of the period From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 05:00:44 EST   In a message dated 3/15/00 1:38:22 AM Eastern Standard Time, Quilisma@socal.rr.com writes:   << but I've never played a Kilgen organ I didn't like ...   OK- now we're getting into an area that I dearly love! (Controversy and intrigue! just kidding, but here is the opening of a GREAt topic!) Just like theatre people who say that ONLY a Wurlitzer is worth hearing and playing, BULL!     even a little 4-rank jobbie in St. Leo's on the North Side ... of course, with acoustics like that, a sewer pipe would have = sounded like a Skinner.   Again, it's sad but some people think that ONLY a Skinner can be = considered a "real organ" or a "real instrument" and the others were just poor seconds = or substitutes. NOT true. To be honest, before going to Shrine I didn't = know a thing about Kilgens except that A) they were built in St. Louis B) they = built the organs for St. Patrick's Cathedral and C) the first name of the = president of the company was George.     But it didn't shriek like a Moller Artiste or a whatever Wicks called their equivalent.   I have also heard some very fine Moller and Wicks organs. What about the Whitelegg instruments? What about the Willis Wicks? (a topic VERY dear to = my heart since he did the Shrine Kilgen too.) I know many, many organists who =   will attest to the overwhelmingly beautiful sound of a Whitelegg Moller.     I've always found Kilgens to have excellent, very sophisticated, suave voicing ... more assertive than an Aeolian, but definitely more = "together" than some run-of-the-mill E.M.Skinners I've played ... some FINE reeds in = the English tradition ... and some good strings and flutes too.   Every single reference here is true ten times over in the Shrine's Kilgen organ, I am very proud to say. Let's be honest- every builder had bad = days and built organs that were less that exciting.       I remember less about the diapasons, but they weren't of the = leather-lipped foghorn variety in the organs I played.   <giggle> True again. The Shrine Kilgen has 7 different ranks of 8' = manual Diapasons, and each one is uniquely different and has its own distinct quality and timbre.     True, I played some fairly sizeable ones, but they weren't in "name" = churches like Scott's, or the cathedrals in St. Louis and NYC.   They don't have to be. The very first Kilgen I ever played was, I = believe, one of the "ensemble" organs. I don't recall whether it was a Petite Ensemble or a Harmonic Ensemble but it was (is) in the little Episcopal = Church in Collierville, Tennessee, a Mayberry-like suburb of Memphis, Tennessee where I grew up. It had four or five ranks and absolutely sang out triumphantly in that tiny church. The second Kilgen I ever came across = was the year before I was hired at Shrine and that one was a two manual in the =   church of St. Michael the Archangel in Homestead, PA. It was a legitimate =   two manual instrument of about 15 ranks and it too rang out and filled = that cavernous room. St. Michael's is a double gallery church- the choir and console being in the lower of the two galleries and the chambers being the =   only things in the more shallow upper gallery. Many of the pipes are = visible through the swell shades and had that Kilgen "orange" stain that you could =   see from a mile away. But it too was a fantastic sound indeed. And then there is Shrine. (And I think I have been more than clear about how I feel =   about that instrument as have everyone who has seen and played it most recently........) =3Do)   Scott Foppiano  
(back) Subject: Re: Kilgen and other builders of the period From: <flcg1018@mails.fju.edu.tw> Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 18:35:15 +0800 (CST)       On Wed, 15 Mar 2000 ScottFop@aol.com wrote:   > In a message dated 3/15/00 1:38:22 AM Eastern Standard Time, > Quilisma@socal.rr.com writes: > > But it didn't shriek like a Moller Artiste or a whatever > Wicks called their equivalent.     Moller Artistes could vary so much... undoubtedly due to the voicer... Moller *could* make them with a nice Diapason rank, if they so desired.... But all too often the Diapason rank sounded fat, tubby, and not unlike an open metal flute... in short, it did not have enough harmonic development, IMHO....   Moller *could* voice the VIola rank like a nice silvery smaller diapason rank if they so desired... On the other hand Moller all too often oviced the Viola like a very vile "Viole d'Orchestre," and so the 8' VIola had to be played with with the 8' Gedeckt rank (sigh).... The 8' Gedeckt rank, however, did sound nice with the VIola at 4', though...     > > > True, I played some fairly sizeable ones, but they weren't in "name" = churches > like Scott's, or the cathedrals in St. Louis and NYC. > > They don't have to be. The very first Kilgen I ever played was, I = believe, > one of the "ensemble" organs. I don't recall whether it was a Petite > Ensemble or a Harmonic Ensemble but it was (is) in the little Episcopal = Church > in Collierville, Tennessee, a Mayberry-like suburb of Memphis, = Tennessee > where I grew up.   Would you be good enough, Scott, to tell us what four or five ranks it = had?   It had four or five ranks and absolutely sang out > triumphantly in that tiny church.     The second Kilgen I ever came across was > the year before I was hired at Shrine and that one was a two manual in = the > church of St. Michael the Archangel in Homestead, PA. It was a = legitimate > two manual instrument of about 15 ranks and it too rang out and filled = that > cavernous room.   Can you tell us what the approximately 15 ranks were?       > > Scott Foppiano >         Best wishes to all..     Morton Belcher   fellow piporg-l list member...  
(back) Subject: Re: 'chorale prelude garbage' From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 06:59:17 -0600   If the title is given in English as well as German and if some kind of "about the music" is placed in the bulletin - then it has more relevance than a bunch of foreign words in a title alone. Even if you tell them nothing - the beauty and style of the music if chosen properly will reflect the service just as well as some piece simply named "prelude" or some other pure music piece. Then again, if you are saying that all the service music must be related to the hymns of the day - 1) you shorten the congregations musical experience to 3-5 melodies a Sunday; 2) at least half the hymns in the current hymnal weren't around when the Baroque chorale preludes were being written and many others have not been set by writers of quality. I think we sell congregations short to say they can't get any worship value out of music unless they recognize the tune. And we certainly sell the literature of the organ short.   Margo    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Hardware From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 08:39:04 EST   Here's what my husband, Ray (a machinist/gunsmith) has to say:     In a message dated 03/15/2000 7:46:46 AM Eastern Standard Time, Wheelman09 =   writes:   There are two easy ways to restore the blue back into steel screws. = First they should be deburred and polished with fine emory cloth or a like fine abrasive. This is easy to do if the screw is spun in a drill press to = shine up the head. The blueing can than be restored by heating the head with a torch until the blue color is evident. The temp will be around 600 = degrees F. If it is over heated the blue will disappear so be carefull not to "go =   past" the blueing temprature. The other way is to apply a cold blue preparation such as "Berchwood Caseys" cold blue formula that can be perchased in most any gun shop or sporting goods store. Just follow the = easy directions. >>  
(back) Subject: Re: Looking for used pipes From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 10:11:33 -0400   Bud, for some reason when I tried to reply to your email it was sent back to me as if there were a problem with your address. A copy of what you requested, though, is in the mail on its way to you.   Regards,   Randy Runyon organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Bairstow Easter Anthem From: "Weber, Richard" <rweber@aero.net> Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 09:49:12 -0600   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0019_01BF8E63.B7895340 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   My mistake; the anthem can be found in The Church Anthem Book edited by = =3D Walford Davies and Henry G. Ley. It is published by Oxford. It is also = =3D available in the series called The Oxford Easy Anthems, # 1. Sorry for =3D the confusion.   Richard Weber   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0019_01BF8E63.B7895340 Content-Type: text/html; charset=3D"iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <HTML><HEAD> <META content=3D3D"text/html; charset=3D3Diso-8859-1" =3D http-equiv=3D3DContent-Type> <META content=3D3D"MSHTML 5.00.2919.6307" name=3D3DGENERATOR> <STYLE></STYLE> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D3D#ffffff> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>My mistake; the anthem can be found in <EM>The =3D Church Anthem=3D20 Book</EM> edited by Walford Davies and Henry G. Ley.&nbsp; It is =3D published by=3D20 Oxford.&nbsp; It is&nbsp;also available in the series called <EM>The =3D Oxford Easy=3D20 Anthems, # 1. </EM>Sorry for the confusion.</FONT></DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT size=3D3D2>Richard Weber</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=3D_NextPart_000_0019_01BF8E63.B7895340--    
(back) Subject: Re: Bairstow Easter Anthem From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 11:10:13 -0400   >My mistake; the anthem can be found in The Church Anthem Book edited by >Walford Davies and Henry G. Ley. It is published by Oxford. It is also >available in the series called The Oxford Easy Anthems, # 1. Sorry for = the >confusion. > >Richard Weber   It's also in the Lionel Daikers collection called _The Church Anthem = Book_, which I think is the successor to the Davies and Ley. I am interested in learning more about "the series called The Oxford Easy Anthems." Is that = a series of individually published anthems as opposed to a book?   Randy Runyon organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: 'chorale prelude garbage' From: <Quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 08:17:52 -0800   I make it a practice NEVER to put "foreign" titles in the bulletin (except for the Latin titles of the Propers, and the English translation of the whole text is printed immediately under the title ... a hoary = anglo-catholic tradition), UNLESS they sound TOTALLY silly in English ... "Dialogue for = the Human Voice", etc.   Cheers,   Bud   Margo Dillard wrote:   > If the title is given in English as well as German and if some kind of > "about the music" is placed in the bulletin - then it has more relevance > than a bunch of foreign words in a title alone. Even if you tell them > nothing - the beauty and style of the music if chosen properly will > reflect the service just as well as some piece simply named "prelude" or > some other pure music piece. Then again, if you are saying that all the > service music must be related to the hymns of the day - 1) you shorten > the congregations musical experience to 3-5 melodies a Sunday; 2) at > least half the hymns in the current hymnal weren't around when the > Baroque chorale preludes were being written and many others have not > been set by writers of quality. I think we sell congregations short to > say they can't get any worship value out of music unless they recognize > the tune. And we certainly sell the literature of the organ short. > > Margo > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: music From: <Quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 08:29:48 -0800   Filial Unit was installing his new computer, and our intranet was down for awhile.   Thanks!   Bud   Randolph Runyon wrote:   > Bud, for some reason when I tried to reply to your email it was sent = back > to me as if there were a problem with your address. A copy of what you > requested, though, is in the mail on its way to you. > > Regards, > > Randy Runyon > organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati > runyonr@muohio.edu > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: The Show Will Go On in Rochester this Saturday From: "Ken Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com> Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 11:31:58 -0500   Tony O'Brien has been forced to cancel his appearance at our Saturday evening concert on the Rochester Wurlitzer. With his help we are pleased = to report that the show will go on with Michigan's Lance Luce at our famous 4/22 console.   Lance Luce has been a longtime favorite of Rochester audiences and this = will be his eighth RTOS performance. The event will be held on this Saturday evening (march 18) at 8 PM. The venue is the art-deco Auditorium Center, = 875 East Main Street, Rochester, NY 14605. The tickets are only $10 each at = the box office before the concert. The more than 2500 seats in the theater assures plenty of excellent locations for all comers.   Please go to http://theatreorgans.com/rochestr/ for driving directions = and much more.   Tony O'Brien will be rescheduled for a future concert. Please include his mother in your prayers.   Regards, Ken Evans, RTOS President    
(back) Subject: Re: Bairstow Easter Anthem From: <Quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 08:35:52 -0800   "Oxford Easy Anthems" is a very useful soft-cover book; most of the = anthems are available separately; the price, as with most of Oxford's books, is HIGH. = I've owned a set and carried them around for years.   Cheers,   Bud   Randolph Runyon wrote:   > >My mistake; the anthem can be found in The Church Anthem Book edited by > >Walford Davies and Henry G. Ley. It is published by Oxford. It is = also > >available in the series called The Oxford Easy Anthems, # 1. Sorry for = the > >confusion. > > > >Richard Weber > > It's also in the Lionel Daikers collection called _The Church Anthem = Book_, > which I think is the successor to the Davies and Ley. I am interested = in > learning more about "the series called The Oxford Easy Anthems." Is = that a > series of individually published anthems as opposed to a book? > > Randy Runyon > organist, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati > runyonr@muohio.edu > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Composer Dates Needed From: "Richard Pinel" <rpinelchat@musicman123.freeserve.co.uk> Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 19:47:53 -0000   >Scott: >Found most of what you need: >Thalben-Ball: 5/18/1896 - 1/18/1897 How amazing, to be so famous and yet die at one year old!!!    
(back) Subject: Re: Composer Dates Needed From: "Ron Natalie" <ron@sensor.com> Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 15:20:48 -0500       Richard Pinel wrote: > > >Scott: > >Found most of what you need: > >Thalben-Ball: 5/18/1896 - 1/18/1897 > How amazing, to be so famous and yet die at one year old!!! >   Really only eight months, he must have really cranked 'em out.  
(back) Subject: Re: Composer Dates Needed From: <Quilisma@socal.rr.com> Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 15:07:45 -0800   He meant 1997, of course, and if I'm not mistaken, didn't G.T-B. play services well into his nineties?   Cheers,   Bud   Richard Pinel wrote:   > >Scott: > >Found most of what you need: > >Thalben-Ball: 5/18/1896 - 1/18/1897 > How amazing, to be so famous and yet die at one year old!!! > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Composer Dates Needed From: "Evelyn Rowe" <efrowe@mindspring.com> Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 18:39:24 -0500   At 03:07 PM 3/15/00 -0800, Bud wrote: >He meant 1997, of course, and if I'm not mistaken, didn't G.T-B. play >services well into his nineties? > Perhaps we should consider the general topic of organist longevity: how = is it that musicians seem either to die tragically young (TB took out = probably as many in the 19th c. as HIV did in the 20th) or survive well past the traditional three-score-and-ten? Bach and Handel seem to be among the few exceptions to that. It can't have anything to do with an unstressful career choice.   Evie  
(back) Subject: Robertson Screws (Was: Organ Hardware) From: "Richard Schneider, President" <arpncorn@davesworld.net> Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 17:47:29 -0600   On Tue, 14 Mar 2000 09:11:20 -0500, Dave C. <ldpatte@attglobal.net> wrote:   > To Rick, John, et al. > We up here in the Great White North have a handy little thing called a = Robertson > screw. The head simply has a square recess in it. The last I heard = they > weren't too popular in the USA, but possibly it was catching on.   They are. I get a catalog every quarter from a company called McFeeley's, which is headquartered in North Carolina. They have a web page at http://www.mcfeeleys.com/ which will supply you with all the Robertson head screws you would ever need. They are very adamant about the difference between their product and the so-called "Drywall" Screws places like Lowe's, Menard's and Home Depot sell.   For my part, I purchase my screws in bulk from a cabinetmaking supply house called Baer Supply Company in Skokie, IL. They also offer the Robertson Head Design, but since most service people don't have a Robertson Head Screwdriver in their tool kits, we've stuck with the hardened Black Oxide Twinfast Phillips screws with relative success.   Baer is a wholesale-only concern that has a $1,000.00 minimum order, so whenever we need screws, we really stock up by the case of every size known to man!   Faithfully,   "Arp in the Corn Patch" Richard Schneider SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Organbuilders 41-43 Johnston St. P. O. Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX arp@schneiderpipeorgans.com Business EMAIL rnjs@family-net.net Personal EMAIL http://www.schneiderpipeorgans.com Web Page URL    
(back) Subject: "robbies" From: <KriderSM@aol.com> Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 18:54:58 EST   I have discovered this Robertson screw, and prefer it over either the Phillips or the slotted. Stan Krider   Dave C. recently commented: <snip>   We up here in the Great White North have a handy little thing called a Robertson   screw. The head simply has a square recess in it. The last I heard they   weren't too popular in the USA, but possibly it was catching on. I = remember we   had guys up from Chicago to do some work for us where I work. They needed =   some   (wood) screws, so someone went across the road to "Canadian Tire" to pick = some   up. When they returned with the "robbies", the Chicago boys had never = seen them   before. They did use them, however, and were pleased with how they = worked. If   you ever get a chance, give them a try.       London, Ont.    
(back) Subject: Fw: Composer Dates Needed From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 19:07:21 -0500   It's amazing- none apparently had saddle sores!   Rick     ----- Original Message ----- From: Evelyn Rowe <efrowe@mindspring.com> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, March 15, 2000 6:39 PM Subject: Re: Composer Dates Needed     > At 03:07 PM 3/15/00 -0800, Bud wrote: > >He meant 1997, of course, and if I'm not mistaken, didn't G.T-B. play > >services well into his nineties? > > > Perhaps we should consider the general topic of organist longevity: how is > it that musicians seem either to die tragically young (TB took out probably > as many in the 19th c. as HIV did in the 20th) or survive well past the > traditional three-score-and-ten? Bach and Handel seem to be among the = few > exceptions to that. It can't have anything to do with an unstressful > career choice. > > Evie > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >