PipeChat Digest #1313 - Monday, March 20, 2000
 
Xpost: Recital review:  Krista Rakich
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: Pipes and Bytes
  by <Cremona502@cs.com>
Re: An elongated "Pipes and Bytes"
  by "ray ahrens" <ray_ahrens@hotmail.com>
Re: If I had any sense ...
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
NEW QUESTION.....
  by <thoehn@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Pipes and Bytes
  by "Ron & Mandy" <ronwest@spiderweb.com.au>
Re: An elongated "Pipes and Bytes"
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
Re: NEW QUESTION.....
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net>
 



(back) Subject: Xpost: Recital review: Krista Rakich From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2000 23:35:05 EST   Today, Krista Rakich, played two recitals at First Presbyterian Church, Gainesville FL, one at 4 pm and a second at 8 pm because of the size of = the Iona Chapel which houses a (1994) 1/9 A. David Moore tracker organ: Prestant 8 - 56 pipes wood and metal (facade) Stopped Diapason 8 - 56 pipes wood Principal 4 - 56 pipes metal Flute 4 - 56 pipes wood Fifteenth Bass 2 - 24 pipes metal Fifteenth Treble 2 - 32 pipes metal Sesquialtera II - 64 pipes metal Cromorne Bass 8 - 32 pipes metal Cromorne Treble 8 - 32 pipes metal Bourdon 16 30 pipes wood (pedal)   Great to Pedal coupler Tremulant Combination Pedal to draw stops; combination pedal to withdraw stops (can = be preset) Suspended Key Action Werkmeister II temperament   ~~~The Program~~~ Prelude, Fugue and Ciacona in C . . . Buxtehude Praeludium in F . . . Fanny Mendelssohn : O wie selig seid ihr doch, ihr frommen . . . Brahms (11 preludes) Schmucke dich, o liebe Seele : Nun danket alle Gott . . . Reger Aus tiefer Not Num komm, der heiden Heiland Wachet auf, ruft uns die stimme : Prelude & Fugue in D minor, Op. 16, No. 3 . . . Clara Schumann : Prelude in B-minor, BWV 544 . . . Bach Gospel Scenes (1994) . . . James Biery (b1956) .....Jesus in the Desert .....The Woman at the Well : 5 Variations on Fairest Lord Jesus . . . James Woodman (b. 1957) : Balm in Gilead (1993) . . . Joe Utterback (b. 1944) : Fugue in B-Minor, BWV 544 . . . Bach : This was first of all, a superbly performed program. Krista displayed excellent control not only of the organ, but of her technique as well. Articulation was clean and precise throughout, from the nuances of the baroque works to the slowly released "sighing" notes in the Gospel Scenes. = The Brahms chorale preludes were very warmly and sensitively played, benefitting from the clarity and warmth of the organ. "Jesus in the = Desert" (Biery) is a haunting setting of "Heinlein" which uses a sighing motif as accompaniment; this was accentuated by the very responsive mechanical = action of the organ and the gentle and intimate voicing of the pipes. One of those "little things" occurred during this piece which made it even more interesting and modified it to "Jesus in the Desert (outside London)". = The pastor's office is immediately adjacent to the chapel with a door opening next to the organ. The door was open during the recital and during the desert piece the Westminster chimes were heard in the background from the office clock! "The Woman at the Well" is a a very interesting setting of "Kingsfold". This is some very interesting and musical, yet distinctively =   different contemporary organ music. Following on its heels was more contemporary music, a setting of 5 = variations on Fairest Lord jesus, by James Woodman: chorale, fughette, pastorale, aria, and charale free harmonization. A very, very unique and pleasant setting. The "Balm in Gilead" by Utterback was a surprise; mainly = because I liked it! I have been disappointed by all of the organ music from his = pen, having been initially excited about it because of the touted jazz = influence. I found his music lacking in substance and form. This piece, and the = other three in the set (according to Krista) are of equal quality. "Balm in Gilead" is definitely jazzy, but also definitely beautiful in its use of free-form improvisatory style and generous harmonic moments. Krista = further enhanced this piece by doing the "old half-draw" making the Stopped = Diapason celeste with the Prestant, and entertained the audience not only with her explanation of the method but by "creating" the celeste exactly as she = wanted it, by holding a note or two and adjusting the wind supply before starting =   the piece. Her verbal program notes were not only historically = informative but humorous and her engaging personality was evident from the floor as = well as the bench. +++My only regret is that there was not enought time for our local chapter to have her do a workshop which the Board did contemplate, but was unable to manage logistically. Krista was in town , along with Frankie Nobert and others, for the International Festival of Women Composers at the = University of Florida. I was fortunate to attend a workshop by Frankie last week, = but managed to be sick from Sunday to Wednesday, although I did crawl into = the light long enough to play for Krista's worshop on Tuesday afternoon. I = was very sorry to miss Frankie Noberts playing on Sunday afternoon, but got a good taste of her artistry and tutelage at her workshop. These are two very talented performers and exceptionally nice people who would do = excellent programs of wide variety for any AGO chapter.  
(back) Subject: Re: Pipes and Bytes From: <Cremona502@cs.com> Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2000 23:53:57 EST   In a message dated 3/19/00 7:23:15 PM Eastern Standard Time,=20 desertbob@rglobal.net writes:   > Show me an organ builder that builds organs strictly for the love of it, > and I'll show you an out-of-work and/or bankrupt organ builder. NAH! There are a goodly number of independent organ builders (tracker,=20 mainly!!) who build for the love of it and make a living. They may not be=20 up there with the Trumps and Perots, but they are working, producing AND =20 paying bills. TTTHHBBBBTTTHHHHH > =20 > However, they *could* improve the ensemble of a Bawld-one Schpinette! Can't!~ As Lerner & Lowe put it: "They've gone about as fer as they kin=20 go." ;0)     > Such instruments are no longer within the financial means of most churche= s > or schools.=20 Not true~ The money is there, but attitudes prevailing today are not=20 sympathetic to quality and reality. As long as there is someone producing=20 the tacky glitzy substitute, there are those with lots of degrees, big bank=20 accounts and no taste who will purchase them.   > A lesson can be learned from all those ratty 3 rank Kilgens > and M=F6llers and Hilgreen and Lanes and what-have-you that are out > there...they tonally suck.=20 There are some wonderful 3-rank Kilgens, although I've heard precious few=20 good Mollers and NO Hilgreen-Lanes that were worth raising the roll-top....=20= =20 but there are also some big digified pipish monstrosities that impress with=20 gadgetry AND tonally suck!   >But if you want a more tonally complete instrument in this day and age, wit= h=20 costs > rising daily in the pipe business, you're going to have to face digital=20 synthesis. > It's simple economics coupled with a vastly improved technology.=20 Garbage and poopoo! It is not necessary to "face digital synthesis" as=20 proven by the many churches that are investing in quality pipe organs withou= t=20 digirrhoid voices. There are, of course, many churches that choose to inves= t=20 in quality air-conditioning, furnishings, carpet, and landscaping but would=20 rather cheat on the organ because it's the one of the group that the fewest=20 people know about and they enjoy being fooled. They're the ones who delight= =20 at parish dinners when some poor schlub eats a plastic banana from the buffe= t=20 table.   Also, look for the pipe business to be hit with an environmental=20 bombshell...lead. The > EPA has been looking at lead content in pipe organs, I can assure you. Good organ builders will conquer this hurdle as well. =20 Just like when all the leather starts falling apart and the chests start leaking, right? The arguement doesn't stand up.=20 Quality builders are getting away from chests full of leather. They're=20 learning slowly. Slider chests do not deteriorate in this way.   > Loudspeakers are easily reconed, amplification systems here and now are=20 almost > distortionless, and more is being learned about acoustic phenomen=E6 that=20 helps >synthesis come closer to pipes all the time. It's a lot cheaper to recone=20 every speaker > in a large e-org than to releather one chest. =20 Alas, the marooons are getting what they pay for. Even after all the=20 reconing is done, they've still GOT A FAKE! Everyone's answer, fortunately= ,=20 is not "go the cheapest way."       Bruce=20 .. . . .in the Beagles' Nest with the Baskerbeagles Molly, Duncan, and Miles Cremona502@cs.com http://community.webtv.net/cremona84000/ALLHAILTHEPOWERand http://community.webtv.net/hydrant/TheBeaglesNest http://community.webtv.net/bruco/STORIESINGLASS  
(back) Subject: Re: An elongated "Pipes and Bytes" From: "ray ahrens" <ray_ahrens@hotmail.com> Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2000 20:59:13 PST   >...and I counter that the APOBA's view is one of any trade >organization...commercial protectionism. Mark my word...the digital >takeover in the organ world is nigh. Those that learn and understand = will >profit, both musically and commercially. Those that don't...gone, along >with Kilgen, Hillgreen and Lane, Hook and Hastings, M=F6ller, = =C6olian-Skinner, >and a host of others.   Who are these "others?" I believe the above were mismanaged into extinction long before digitals became a glint in some computer nerd's = eye. Invalid argument. ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com    
(back) Subject: Re: If I had any sense ... From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2000 21:45:52   At 07:30 PM 3/19/2000 -0800, you wrote: >Oh, about every hundred years or so, if it was good leather to begin with, and the >church isn't next to a factory that produces toxic fumes.<snip>   If...if...IF! Such is not the case in a majority of installations in this country. Cheesy leather, improperly installed and treated, abounds.   >but how many of you drive hundred-year-old CARS?<snip>   Tut tut! No cars in 1900 to speak of...unfounded allegory!   >> so do soldered joints,   >again, not if they're done right in the first place.<snip>   If...if...IF!   >> so does wood. > >That IS becoming a problem today, but there are creative ways around it .... as I >recall, one organ-builder salvaged a large amount of fine 19th century lumber when >he remodeled a former factory (or whatever) for his new organ-building shop.<snip>   How does that even fit in with the contemporary, mass-produced organ of the here and now? What did he make of it? One, perhaps two organs? Kiln-dried lumber is becoming a scare luxury, partly thanks to the marauding Japanese, who get most of our quality unmilled timber these days.   >> It's nature's way. This >> requires constant upkeep and repair, as well as tuning, slowly becoming a >> lost art in itself, it seems. > >I will admit to using a strobe tuner for trebles and mixtures ... advancing age, >you know<snip>   Ah, another point! Are trebles wasted on the young? Who's to say that they cannot be done correctly with electronics? Rather to have trebles produced by good tweeters than none at all. This could be aptly applied to some of the moaning, groaning sludge masters build in the early part of this century, with a minimum destruction of the original instrument. Let's face it, a treble pipe that speaks at, say 4 KHz is going to have but THREE audible harmonics (four, it you have dog ears like I did in my 30s), plus the usual wind hash. With programmable start, run and stop cycles, this isn't much of a chore. Stereo stage the "rank" at the proper place in the chamber, and you're there.   ... and I no longer set a temperament with nothing but a tuning fork to >give me the "A", but I know how.<snip>   It hurts my head to do it anymore. All that counting...I feel like a bookkeeper!   >and the RC ones (in particular) had been the happy recipient of decades >of "benign neglect", which just goes to prove how sturdy those old organs >are ... in most cases, they were even still in reasonable TUNE.<snip>   The E. & G.G. Hook at IC in Baaahstun comes to mind here. If it weren't for the Hook's high quality all around, it would also be long gone. Even the 1912 H&H electrification held up fairly well. But, in 1978, the organ required considerable "fiddling with" just to get it well enough to record, and none of the registration appliances worked at all. The labored wheezing of an organ way past due for rebuilding was all too evident in quiet passages.   >And the biodegradable life of computer boards is ...   Itchy fiberglas! Good point; most electronics parts are non-recyclable. almost ALL of a pipe organ is.   >Unless they have a musician with some knowledge (AND principles) to lead them.<snip>   Just like how you nurse along Le Grande Hammonde with not a care in the world from the rector, eh, Bud?   >> For better or worse, that's the way it is. > >Doesn't have to be ... At least not as long as there's OHS and and Organ Clearing House (grin).<snip>   The latter being a sadly overlooked resource. Fine little instruments (and some larger!) go without new homes for long periods of time. Perhaps it's sheer ignorance, or just the want by the "brat boys" for all the "bells and whistles", as BrewSe mentioned so well. However, the e-org business is highly organized, and profit-driven. They send salesmen to all churches contemplating new sanctuaries or remodeling jobs. Where's OCH? They never heard of them. 70 years ago, Kilgen, M=F6ller, even the vaunted =C6-S had scads of distributers' agents doing the same thing. How many pipe concerns are aggressive about sales nowadays, at least up to the level of what the Allen and Rodgers dealers do? Few, if any, I'd surmise.   This sort of complacency is precisely how the nation's railroads lost megatons of freight to trucks from the 1940's on, and how a snooty, unaware AT&T lost almost half its market share to competitors...they didn't "sell". No sale, no money. No money, NO survival rate! It's economics. Deal with it.   DeserTBoB  
(back) Subject: NEW QUESTION..... From: <thoehn@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2000 01:42:12 -0500   Does the APOBA have a regulation regarding how to specify the number of ranks in an instrument? Does a 12 note extension to a rank constitute an additional rank? I have discovered several things that make me wonder just what this organization is for if a manufacturer who is a member of APOBA can embellish stop lists and specifications by turning a 73 note set of pipes (16-8) into 2 individual 61 note ranks or an 85 note rank (16-8-4) and call it 3 individual ranks of 61 notes in the proposal to the church. The last time I looked 3 61 note ranks equalled 183 pipes, not 85. Yet proposals are out there that are misleading the consumer.   And what about the manufacturer who makes tonal modification to an instrument moving a rank from one location to another in the same instrument (from Sw to CH) and adding the same 61 pipes into the new enlarged specification a second time? Or labels a III rnk mixture a IV rank Fourniture?   Is this really what APOBA members are like? If it is I'll take the plug in any day of the week...at least I know what I'm getting when it's delivered....          
(back) Subject: Re: Pipes and Bytes From: "Ron & Mandy" <ronwest@spiderweb.com.au> Date: Mon, 20 Mar 2000 16:25:49 +1000   As Lerner & Lowe put it: "They've gone about as fer as they kin go." ;0) Try Rodgers and Hammerstein.      
(back) Subject: Re: An elongated "Pipes and Bytes" From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2000 23:36:39   At 08:59 PM 3/19/2000 PST, you wrote:   >Who are these "others?" I believe the above were mismanaged into=20 >extinction long before digitals became a glint in some computer nerd's eye.= =20 >Invalid argument.<snip>   Not invalid at all. Kilgen's stock in trade were small unit organs, many, unfortunately, of questionable quality after WWII. Allen ate their lunch with the 6SN7 powered ranks of oscillators, both price- and "perceived" performance-wise. (Actually, I would have taken the nasty little Kilgen over some of those nasty Allen W-T and B-Ts, but that's not important right now.) Hammond still syphoned off "low-ball jobs" with the RT series (notably to Catholic churches) at the same time. The ubiquitous and cheap Baldwin 5, and a smattering of Wurlitzer Orgatrons had a hand in it, too.   =C6-S and M=F6ller enjoyed a higher niche in the market, but they too began = to be assaulted by Allen and newcomers Rodgers and Saville in the 1960s. =C6-S's quality remained high, but M=F6ller delivered many a wind-starved th= ree manual nightmare. I've played a few that made contemporary Allens sound pretty good! Evidently many churches on the lower end of M=F6ller's market thought so too, and they bought 3 manual Allens in droves. As the lower cost/higher volume smaller organ dried up slowly, so did profitability. Instruments of considerable size and competance were built by both builders in this era, but such showpiece instruments were hardly as profitable as selling large numbers of mass-produced, "throw 'em in" organs, as was M=F6ller's specialty in that era, and exactly the e-org manufacturer's targe= t market. =C6-S' management crisis in the '70s only hastened the unfortunatel= y inevitable.   Had such pipeless competition not been around, I'm pretty sure all three might have survived to this day, in spite of poor management. One must also concur that part of "able management" is knowing one's competition, and being able to fend it off, which these particular builders obviouisly didn't or couldn't do. As for a list of others that succumbed during this time frame, that will take some time to do.   This discussion is about e-orgs vs. pipes, not necessarily digits vs. pipes. Pay attention. Invalidation of my arguement invalidated....NEXT, PLEASE!   dB  
(back) Subject: Re: NEW QUESTION..... From: "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@rglobal.net> Date: Mon, 20 Mar 2000 00:37:12   At 01:42 AM 3/19/2000 -0500, you wrote:   >Is this really what APOBA members are like? If it is I'll take the plug >in any day of the week...at least I know what I'm getting when it's >delivered....<snip>   Hey...it's a commercial trade organization. They can cheat, but the competition can't. SOP for business organizations.   DeserTBoB